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Harmony In Practice Answers for Ex. 19


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#1 Garkleine

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Posted 21 June 2021 - 17:11

Hi

 

I am working through the exercises in the ABRSM Butterworth book.

On page 21 Exercises 19:

Is there only one correct answer?

I worked through the exercises but my chords don't match the exact configuration of those in the answer book.

In order to get exactly what they want I feel there should more specific instructions?

My working seems fine but doesn't exactly match how they have placed the notes of the chords.

So am I wrong if I don't write exactly what is in the answer book?

 

Any advice appreciated :)

 


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#2 Hildegard

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Posted 25 June 2021 - 07:11

Sorry not to have replied sooner - we have been away on a short staycation - yea!

 

The exercise in question involves writing out triads (expressed in extended Roman notation) as four-part chords on a pair of staves. There are indeed many correct answers to each of the examples, depending on which octaves you choose to lay out each note and which of the three notes you choose to double in order to turn the triad into four-part harmony. So, for each chord, the answer book simply gives one of a number of correct answers. An answer which includes a wrong note (e.g. putting the note A in a chord of C major) or that breaks a rule (such as doubling the leading note or having too wide a spacing between, say, tenor and alto) would be wrong.

Hope that helps.


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#3 Latin pianist

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Posted 25 June 2021 - 07:38

Going to be a pedant, Hildegard! Apparently a staycation is when you stay in your own home for your holiday, not merely a holiday in your own country. Read that the other day. But hope you had a good time anyway.


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#4 Hildegard

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Posted 25 June 2021 - 07:52

If you stay in your own home, how is a holiday different from any other day for those of us who are retired?

But we did indeed have a good time, having travelled 250 miles, stayed in a rather empty hotel, had some good meals out, looked in on some old friends (not seen since before the pandemic), did a round of boat trips, art gallery, museum and cathedral visits and just a little shopping. We even had a few sunny days!


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#5 Latin pianist

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Posted 25 June 2021 - 08:19

Well I think the idea was that you stayed in your own home and went to local places each day so it was a sort of holiday. Our church ran an event called Holiday at Home for elderly people one year. Personally I would see all the jobs that wanted doing in my own home and wouldn’t relax at all.


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#6 Garkleine

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Posted 04 July 2021 - 18:07

Sorry not to have replied sooner - we have been away on a short staycation - yea!

 

The exercise in question involves writing out triads (expressed in extended Roman notation) as four-part chords on a pair of staves. There are indeed many correct answers to each of the examples, depending on which octaves you choose to lay out each note and which of the three notes you choose to double in order to turn the triad into four-part harmony. So, for each chord, the answer book simply gives one of a number of correct answers. An answer which includes a wrong note (e.g. putting the note A in a chord of C major) or that breaks a rule (such as doubling the leading note or having too wide a spacing between, say, tenor and alto) would be wrong.

Hope that helps.

 

Thank you very much for your insight. It was as I was thinking but I doubted myself. Many thanks :)


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