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Recorded exam options


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#16 elemimele

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Posted 04 May 2021 - 20:03

I think the only comment I'd add is that yes, they might be part of two relatively high-level Music Technology courses, but everyone is wanting to make YouTubes nowadays. It's no longer a specialist skill-set that should be reserved for those verging on making it a profession. My kid was doing Photoshop last term as a generalist thing in year 7. They were even doing stop-motion animation. It's always the same: the visual stuff gets there first, and the sound-track appears when someone remembers. It was the same with computer gaming: back in the days when most serious amateur game-programming was on a PC, people were doing miracles with a VGA card and then adding something that went "bleep". You'd read the VGA specifications with enthusiasm, and the SoundBlaster specifications with a horrible sinking feeling.

Incidentally, primary-school-teachers out there, there is nothing more fun than getting a kid to make a Foley-artist box, and do their own sound-effects...


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#17 ViolinsAreForLife

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Posted 04 May 2021 - 20:59

I think the only comment I'd add is that yes, they might be part of two relatively high-level Music Technology courses, but everyone is wanting to make YouTubes nowadays. It's no longer a specialist skill-set that should be reserved for those verging on making it a profession. My kid was doing Photoshop last term as a generalist thing in year 7. They were even doing stop-motion animation. It's always the same: the visual stuff gets there first, and the sound-track appears when someone remembers. It was the same with computer gaming: back in the days when most serious amateur game-programming was on a PC, people were doing miracles with a VGA card and then adding something that went "bleep". You'd read the VGA specifications with enthusiasm, and the SoundBlaster specifications with a horrible sinking feeling.

Incidentally, primary-school-teachers out there, there is nothing more fun than getting a kid to make a Foley-artist box, and do their own sound-effects...

 

Yes, Foley and soundtracks are an incredible opportunity... Multimedia literacy... You are right, sound gets there second, you may be on to something there! 

 

Of course musical instruments, even a recorder, are high examples of human technology, but the context for their use has changed and we need to recognise

that engaging people with just a musical instrument per se may not be enough. This is particularly true in 'classical' music training because there is not as much

focus on ensemble playing in the way that one sees in traditional Scottish/Irish music or in rock/pop bands, where it is less about hierarchy and much more about fun, unity, and democracy... If we want reluctant young people or adults to take up an instrument the worst thing we can do is to give them a book with set pieces and go 'one exam this year, then another next year, just you and me': we engage with what they are curious about - world music, contemporary music, obscure genres, multimedia application of sound, composing their own music, songwriting, multi-tracking, spitting/rapping, DJ-ing, making a CD/EP for a significant person in their life - whatever rocks their boat or fulfils a particular need... 

 

There is a huge conversation to have about all the low-fi music teaching that goes on, as well, where sensory approaches to music are used, for example in helping people with severe barriers to communication/learning experience sound... There is no OBLIGATION for every context to adopt one approach or aspire to be engaged in digital music making, streaming, sound production, high-tech stuff: there is, however, an obligation for everyone to experience music in primary AND secondary school, whether they choose to be musicians or not, and to do so in a non-elitist way, which means no lesson fees from schools/councils, a huge reinvestment in free musical instruments, not leaving everything to already stretched community centres or Saturday schools... 

 

It is time for a musical revolution and what better time to demonstrate how people coming out of a year in lockdown need music to feel alive again?

Music is made by musicians, who need training for years and who should come from all walks of life... There should be no barriers to entry to the music profession based on class, your parents' occupation, your ethnicity, gender, etc. I do hope we can rebuild the devastated country and, with it, the live music industry that has been left so badly bruised. All musicians should look out for one another and come out of their particular tribe, because we all share a love for making music, regardless of whether we be jazz, atonal, coders, traditional, classical, contemporary, djent, etc.

 

Would love to hear other people's views on how lockdown has changed or reinforced their use of MT (music technology)... 

 

Cheers 


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#18 Yet another muso

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Posted 06 May 2021 - 00:24

To follow on from ViolinsAreForLife's posts expressing concern about examiners being overly harsh on dynamic variety, due to shortfalls in sound quality rather than the actual playing, it would be interesting to hear other people's views on examiner assessments for the remote exams. 

 

Just to share my experience since entering pupils for online performance exams, I have entered 8 candidates for ABRSM Performance Grades so far, and am overall very satisfied with the assessment side. Results have always been very close to my expectations. I have been really pleased with the written reports, and have noticed that compared to live exams where examiners have next to no time to write their comments on the pieces, the comments for the Performance Grades are overall more considered and insightful. I had previously been rather cynical about the fact Performance Grades cost as much as face to face exams, but have now seen evidence that they are compensating for not having to do all the supporting tests by spending more time writing the reports. The pupils have been a fair spread of standards, and the pianists playing on a variety of home pianos, not all good ones! So far, I have been very satisfied.

 

How have other people's experiences been?


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#19 Latin pianist

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Posted 08 May 2021 - 05:59

For abrsm performance grades does the candidate need to show to the camera the music for pieces from the syllabus they’re using which are not in the actual exam book? I know they have to show the music from the fourth own choice piece. The candidate we tried to record yesterday was actually using 4 different books!


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#20 Hildegard

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Posted 08 May 2021 - 06:34

For abrsm performance grades does the candidate need to show to the camera the music for pieces from the syllabus they’re using which are not in the actual exam book?

 

No. The guidance booklet says that only the programme form and the first page of the candidate's copy of their own-choice piece need to be shown to the camera.


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#21 Latin pianist

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Posted 08 May 2021 - 06:51

Thanks. This is all such a learning curve especially as I'm using 3 different boards for recorded exams.
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