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Piano chord progressions book


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#1 Tatty18

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Posted 14 June 2020 - 23:04

Hi there,

 

I'm wondering if anyone know of any book with lists of chord progressions. I'm not looking for the theoretical understanding as I'm a music teacher. I just wonder if there's a book out there with chord progressions which I can use for an improvisation class (I just want an easy reference I can refer to and quickly choose from, as the class is quite complex in other areas) - so lots of chord progressions without all the bumff about what a chord is and how to form the 7th etc etc

 

I've scoured Amazon and to be honest it seems quite a poor selection.

 

Also I'd be interested in any books which contain tips for LH patterns for improvisation (piano is about my 5th instrument so i am quite limited)

 

Many thanks for any suggestions.

 

Alison


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#2 BadStrad

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Posted 15 June 2020 - 00:12

I'm guessing you are attending the class as a student and are looking for some background reading before class so as not to "go in cold." Is there a particular style of improvisation (eg jazz) that you're interested in/that the class is aiming towards? Or why not wait and see if there is a recommended text.
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#3 Tatty18

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Posted 15 June 2020 - 11:58

Sorry I should have explained, I'm a teacher looking for suggestions for new books to use. Need a quick reference to have ready made chord progressions at hand. I use just make them up, but I won't have the time to do this with this class.

 

Thanks


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#4 LoneM

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Posted 16 June 2020 - 10:55

I don't know if this free booklet -  Uncle Rod's Ukulele Bootcamp - is any use to you.  From page 5 it contains interesting chord progressions in several keys. Of course there is no staff notation but if you are happy to work from chord names I think it will give you quite a lot of scope. For example, the first key is C and looks like this:

 

C   Am   F   G7  

 

C   Cdim   Dm7   G7

 

C  C7    F   Fm6  

 

C   Am   D7    G7

 

E7   Am   D7   G7   C

 

(Copyright Uncle Rod Higuchi, free for educational use)


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#5 BadStrad

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Posted 16 June 2020 - 11:25

Do you really need to buy a book?

It would take five - ten minutes to write out your own list in roman numeral form, which then works for any key. Students in an advanced (complex) class would surely know which chords correspond to the numbers. Many improvisers use the format, especially if working with singers, so they can change key easily. Even those who don't read notation will use I II III IV... etc.

Failing that then flick through some music of whatever genre you're working in and pick the chords out. Depending on the genre, they might even be the chord names written in and all you have to do is translate into roman numeral form.

That would be much faster than scouring the net for a book you probably don't really need.
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#6 Clovis

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Posted 17 June 2020 - 16:49

Lucinda Mackworth-Young's Piano By Ear might help. It includes improvisation over standard chord progressions and bass lines. No lists though.

 

There's a section (with videos) on the book on her website.


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