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Wooden flutes


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#16 Misterioso

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Posted 03 December 2019 - 21:36

Many thanks, dorfmouse - there is a hive of fascinating information there and I will revisit it.

 

Good to hear about your wooden flute! Do let me know when it reaches you. I think you are very brave learning to play in traditional Irish style. (I also think you must have bigger hands than my tiny mitts as I could never manage the finger spacing!)

 

I'm so glad I took the plunge, and hope you are as delighted with your new flute as I am with mine.

 

Happy flauting! :flute:


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#17 thara96

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Posted 04 December 2019 - 07:29

Wow Misterioso you must be thrilled!


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#18 dorfmouse

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Posted 04 December 2019 - 10:39

I have quite small hands and even tin whistle holes need practice to cover properly! This flutemaker asks you for a photo of your hands on a ruler so he can place the holes as comfortably as possible for the individual. I am hoping!
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#19 dorfmouse

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Posted 07 December 2019 - 13:40

The flute went on a bit of a mystery tour due to a minor error in the address and was sent back to her maker! She's on her way again and hopefully won't have a sulky fit on arrival!
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#20 dorfmouse

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Posted 15 December 2019 - 15:40

Sadly I'll have to send her back. I definitely need an offset G. Tried every version of piper's grips and flute setup plus teacher's and maker's suggestions,to no avail. I need about an exra cm on my ring finger! The flutemaker has been as good as his word as regards trying out. Sad, but I'll continue investigations. Really need to try out a variety I think.
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#21 Misterioso

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Posted 17 December 2019 - 22:03

What a shame, Dorfmouse. Will you get a replacement with the offset G, or wait until you can try out an assortment to see what works for you?

 

My experience so far:

 

It's heavier to hold (probably because of the metal liner) but not too heavy.

There is an extra roller for low B.

A lot more puff seems to be needed, so it's quite tiring to play for more than a short time; hopefully that's just part of the getting used to it. 

It  has open holes, although they are plugged for now; my plan would be to eventually "retire" the plugs.  


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#22 dorfmouse

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Posted 18 December 2019 - 13:31

Thanks Misterioso. My teacher suggested looking for Baroque flutes on ebay etc. He, being also a restorer and repairer, picked up one for a song a few months ago, and after his expert attentions it is now a beautiful, valuable instrument. I really need to do a lot of trying out.
In the meanwhile I'm practising my soprano D whistle more consistently to consolidate the fingering and articulations and will try to work down to the lovely low D. At least whistles are cheap!
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#23 adultpianist

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Posted 21 December 2019 - 18:34

IT'S ARRIVED! :wub: 

 

I'm so excited. It has a beautiful mellow tone, which is exactly what I was looking for, although I haven't tried it out properly yet as I have a student arriving imminently. It came really well packaged too, and it looks gorgeous.

 

About cleaning: I've always used those fluffy brush things for cleaning my metal flute, and think they actually do the job more thoroughly than the pull-throughs (but I could be wrong) and never leave fluffy bits on or in the flute. With this one being wood, is it okay to carry on using my brushes? Will they dry out the inside thoroughly enough? Any other care tips for looking after a wooden flute? I'd expected a sheet of care tips, but there isn't one.

 

There is nothing quite like getting a brand new musical instrument. :wub:

 

Just found this thread.  I presume you intend to play baroque music because otherwise why get a wooden flute?.  I love baroque music but interestingly enough my ex flute teacher never played a baroque flute and I do not know why because she was trained at the London School of Music and I thought they would cover all aspects of flute playing


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#24 elemimele

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Posted 22 December 2019 - 11:52

hm, tricksy one. I can understand why a music school might not teach historical flutes in sufficient practical detail for one of their students to feel confident to teach or play them in later life. The flute was in a constant state of evolution over a long period from which we draw music we enjoy today, so it would be hard to know which instruments to pick and teach. Lisa Beznosiuk (lead flutist of the orchestra of the age of enlightenment) has a lot of interesting YouTube videos on the different flutes she uses for authentic performance of music from different eras. To my mind, only a small number of flutists would have either the financial resources, or the skill/time to cover these aspects of historical performance as thoroughly as she does.

Meanwhile the other common wooden flute today would be the Irish flute, which again is different to the Baroque flute from which it evolved (it's louder, with bigger tone holes, but I believe this means its cross-fingerings don't work so well, so it is always played in restricted keys. This isn't a problem for traditional Irish music which derives its beauty from simple tunefulness, and doesn't require clever chromatic stuff. Almost everything is in D or G, and if it isn't, the Penny Whistle players will be seriously upset anyway).


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#25 dorfmouse

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Posted 27 December 2019 - 13:47

I am now seriously looking into buying a Low D whistle and have found a maker who does offset holes, hooray!
(From my investigations so far, it seems that whistlers outdo even recorder players for collecting vast numbers of instruments!)
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