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Poll: Why Did You Become A Teacher?


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Poll: Why Did You Become a Teacher? (27 member(s) have cast votes)

Principally, which closest matches why you became an instrument/music teacher?

  1. The job allowed for flexibility giving a good work-life balance, including the options of working from home or part-time. (4 votes [14.81%])

    Percentage of vote: 14.81%

  2. I was good at <insert instrument(s)>/found it easy to learn when I was young and I wanted/needed to be my own boss but this was my only/main skill at the time. (1 votes [3.70%])

    Percentage of vote: 3.70%

  3. I wanted to play professionally but ultimately I wasn’t good enough, so this was my only real option at the time. (1 votes [3.70%])

    Percentage of vote: 3.70%

  4. If I’m honest I didn’t really want to be a teacher, but I was good at <insert instrument(s)>/found it easy to learn when I was young and so I could make a living out of it. (2 votes [7.41%])

    Percentage of vote: 7.41%

  5. Music/instrument tuition was in my family so it was a natural progression. (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  6. My real passion is understanding the neruo- and psychological fundamentals of learning (andragogy, heutagogy and pedagogy) and this is just one way that allows me to myself to find new ways to teach.I hate using the same core set of teaching materials. (1 votes [3.70%])

    Percentage of vote: 3.70%

  7. It’s not a “job”, it’s a total and utter vocation that I was always destined for! My life IS instrument/music teaching. I (would) happily teach for virtually nothing and live in an old caravan! (5 votes [18.52%])

    Percentage of vote: 18.52%

  8. I was good at <insert instrument(s)>/found it easy to learn when I was young and I quite liked the idea of teaching good pupils who were like me at that age. To be honest I struggle with slow learners & wish I didn’t have them. (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  9. I wish I could say for purely altruistic reasons, however in reality it’s for largely selfish reasons – I just love seeing pupils develop, no matter by how little or a lot. It makes ME feel good/happy. (2 votes [7.41%])

    Percentage of vote: 7.41%

  10. None of the above remotely matches my principal reason. (11 votes [40.74%])

    Percentage of vote: 40.74%

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#31 ma non troppo

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Posted 31 October 2019 - 00:03

I've been told that the church doesn't charge for baptisms unlike weddings and funerals, but round here, the vicar does ask for an organist's fee. So the family should still have paid you.My general rule with services is that if I would have been there anyway eg funerals of friends, church members etc, I don't take a fee. I don't get paid for playing at my own Methodist church and that's fine because I attend anyway.

Well I think that you should be paid for the regular church services at least! My plumber lives a couple of houses down and I wouldn't expect not to pay him because he is "here anyway" . Also, what happens if you retire from your post? Will the new organist be expected ro play for free? Presumably there is a collection during the service. Why should you not be paid part of that?

If we don't value what we do why should anyone else? The churches are really taking advantage of people - pay your musicians for the work they do for you!
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#32 Latin pianist

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Posted 31 October 2019 - 07:24

In my church there are people with all sorts of skills, eg flower arranging, Sunday School teaching, accountancy skills, secretarial skills, IT skills and no one expects or wants to be paid. People can take expenses for things they have to buy. I expect if we had a plumber attending, he/she might well offer their services free. If there is a week I am unable to play , we can play hymn music over our speakers. Obviously haven't experienced this myself but OH says it works OK so I expect the church would do this if I retired.
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#33 mel2

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Posted 31 October 2019 - 07:49

I agree with all of the above from LP and MNT.
It's awkward because I am not the regular organist - just filling in for his/her absence.
When I have subbed for services I've not been offered payment even tho' the regular gets his honorarium. It's been suggested that he reimburse me from this but it's awkward to have to ask.
The baptism was somewhere else (same day) and incurred two 15-mile round trips but once the vicar spoke, none of the collection (overflowing with £5 notes) came my way.
It won't happen again.
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#34 ma non troppo

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Posted 31 October 2019 - 10:34

It's no wonder that churches are often very wealthy organisations!
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#35 Piano Meg

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Posted 31 October 2019 - 12:33

Apologies - a bit off topic, but...

 

It's no wonder that churches are often very wealthy organisations!

 

I think that's the exception rather than the rule. Our church is certainly not wealthy! Not in terms of finances. 

 

I'm similar to Latin Pianist. I play and many others use their talents and skills without charge to benefit our church (the people) and local community, because we want to show our gratitude for what God has done for us. Giving freely of what we have is a joy because it's an expression of our faith and we see it as giving back to him. For us, church is God's family, not an organisation that happens to have religion as its emphasis (which does seem to sometimes be the case) so it's not work, it's family life. We're not being taken advantage of.

 

We even actually have a plumber at our church :) , who does jobs without charge for the same reason. 

 

I do understand your point though, MNT. If we're getting substantial jobs done by church members or any job by someone who's not a church member, we would expect to pay them. If an organist is not offering to give their services for free, they should be paid. If I'm asked to play for a wedding/funeral for someone outside the church family, I would also expect payment. I'm also strict with my payment policy for pupils. Just for some of us, playing for church is different. 


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#36 mel2

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Posted 31 October 2019 - 15:31

I feel as though I have inadvertently hi-jacked this thread -apologies to LF!
In this parish I have deputized on many occasions including Christmas day and accept it as a pay-back for having the use of the instrument. As with any instrument, practising consistently is necessary to maintain an acceptable standard. Apart from hymn books though, the church does not pay for my sheet music. Nor has any church organist who has acted as my teacher offered to waive their lesson fee because I will be playing for church services.
Last Sunday was a significant service reaching out to (on the whole) non church attenders, and brought in a large collection. It wasn't a service I would normally attend, but having been asked to do it, I prepared, using my own resources and my own time. So along with the baptism elsewhere (which entailed travelling and petrol), it took up a whole day of my weekend.

Not all churches in the area have this policy, thankfully. They will have first call on my time should they request it.
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#37 ma non troppo

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Posted 31 October 2019 - 21:49

Equal apologies for hijacking. But I stand by my observation that there is a reason why church organisations are rich. Your individual church may not seem so, but trust me, the machine behind it is. I suggest googling how much they are worth and you will find it is billions. Maybe you don't mind, but I feel it is exploitation - taking advantage of people's generosity.

Maybe this isn't entirely off topic when taken in the context of the OP and the poll. We must value what we do, not just for ourselves but for other musicians.

Soap box descended from!
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