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Position of an acoustic piano


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#1 tangoallegro

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Posted 30 September 2019 - 17:27

Any thoughts from piano players appreciated.

I currently have a large upright piano, the back is against an external wall of a detached house on the wall furthest away from my neighbours. I would like to move the piano into the room closest to my neighbours with the back of the piano facing against an internal wall. There is a large patio door to one wall. I have a passage way / small path which separates my house from my neighbour’s.

There are currently two sheets of thick foam behind the piano to dampen the sound and I plan to also place the piano on a rug when moved.

Do you think there will be any issue with sound/noise complaints? I don’t teach piano but occasionally accompany my students. I normally practice during the day.

Any advice appreciated.
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#2 Banjogirl

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Posted 30 September 2019 - 18:09

It will make a difference, but that doesn't mean it'll be a problem for your neighbours. Our piano (end terrace) is on thick material to absorb the sound, and in a room with a party wall, though our walls are very thick. Our temporary second piano is on the hard floor in the hall and I have to say it sounds loads better, so is much more enjoyable to play.
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#3 corenfa

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Posted 30 September 2019 - 18:11

Depends on the neighbours. My neighbour's piano is against the party wall and I can hear it quite clearly. But I am a pianist and so I am happy to hear her play!
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#4 Ligneo Fistula

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Posted 30 September 2019 - 19:17

Depends on the neighbours. My neighbour's piano is against the party wall and I can hear it quite clearly. But I am a pianist and so I am happy to hear her play!

imagines loads of passive-agressive piano battles from each household :rofl:


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#5 corenfa

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Posted 30 September 2019 - 21:24


Depends on the neighbours. My neighbour's piano is against the party wall and I can hear it quite clearly. But I am a pianist and so I am happy to hear her play!

imagines loads of passive-agressive piano battles from each household :rofl:
Ha! It's more like, it's nice to hear someone who isn't me playing, and I feel less guilty about potentially being a nose nuisance myself!

... But one thing we all agree on is that the neighbour on the other side only knows one piece- Fur Elise- and their piano is never tuned.
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#6 BadStrad

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Posted 30 September 2019 - 23:57

I guess much will come down to how well you and your neighbours get on. At our old house the neighbours could hear our piano and my violin. Luckily they enjoyed "the free concerts." I think I was probably more irritated by them having the cricket commentary playing at full blast when they were gardening (or just sunning themselves).
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#7 tangoallegro

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Posted 02 October 2019 - 08:02

Thank you for your replies. To clarify, my piano would be against an internal wall in a room which is not joined on to any neighbours. Perhaps I am overthinking but I wondered if the sound might still travel. You can probably sense that I am a nervous second study piano player!
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#8 corenfa

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Posted 02 October 2019 - 08:33

It will still be audible to them (that's my setup), but nobody has complained about it in the 7 years I've had this. Having said that, as mentioned above, my neighbour also plays the piano so might be less likely to complain anyway. 


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#9 tangoallegro

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Posted 02 October 2019 - 08:46

It will still be audible to them (that's my setup), but nobody has complained about it in the 7 years I've had this. Having said that, as mentioned above, my neighbour also plays the piano so might be less likely to complain anyway.


Thanks Corenfa. The room it is going into (hopefully) is going to be extended. I’m currently waiting for a quote for sound proof plasterboard and quilting so hopefully it will cut a little more noise although it won’t be totally sound proof. The neighbours have always been lovely but I am a natural born worrier!
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#10 chris13

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Posted 02 October 2019 - 08:46

I shouldn't think that there will be a problem between detached properties.


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#11 The Great Sosso

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Posted 07 October 2019 - 17:03

My advice is if you are concerned (which you clearly are) speak to your neighbours before you make any changes, for the sake of good relations.  We recently installed a drum kit in our semi, in the room furthest from the attached neighbours, thinking that would be fine, but in fact the sound goes up through the ceiling, along our floors and into their house.  We're now regretting not getting the room soundproofed when it was built (It's an extension), as retrospective soundproofing doesn't really work - there's always a leak somewhere.

 

Obviously drums are noisier than a piano, but sound carries more than you might think.

 

TGS X


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#12 tangoallegro

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Posted 07 October 2019 - 18:00

My advice is if you are concerned (which you clearly are) speak to your neighbours before you make any changes, for the sake of good relations.  We recently installed a drum kit in our semi, in the room furthest from the attached neighbours, thinking that would be fine, but in fact the sound goes up through the ceiling, along our floors and into their house.  We're now regretting not getting the room soundproofed when it was built (It's an extension), as retrospective soundproofing doesn't really work - there's always a leak somewhere.
 
Obviously drums are noisier than a piano, but sound carries more than you might think.
 
TGS X


Thank you very much for this advice. We have worked out that a lot of the sound is escaping through a large patio window so we are arranging for a very thick acoustic glass to be installed. Fortunately we are detached so the change of glass should hopefully make a big difference.

The neighbours are lovely, they tell me that they specifically come out into the garden to listen to me play. However, there’s only so much Czerny anyone can take!
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