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What Diploma to Do Next?

LRSM LLCM LTCL bassoon

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#1 Wai Kit Leung

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Posted 11 August 2015 - 03:11

I am considering doing another diploma, this time on bassoon.  Currently I hold the following:

 

FRSM, LRSM, DipABRSM in Oboe Performance

DipABRSM in Recorder Performance

Advanced Certificate (ABRSM) in Bassoon

 

If I do an L diploma, do you think LLCM or LTCL will be better than LRSM, because that will put another title behind my name?  It will be rather clumsy to put LRSM (Oboe Performance), LRSM (Bassoon Performance).

 

Your opinion is most welcome!


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#2 Appassionata

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Posted 13 August 2015 - 10:33

Is it having more letters that is important to you, or doing the diploma? I have 2 ATCLs but I just put ATCL after my name once (if at all to be honest!). Do whichever diploma syllabus suits you better musically and in my opinion forget about the letters you'll get completely! 


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#3 allegretto

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Posted 14 August 2015 - 11:56

Don't people generally just use the 'highest' set of letters you've attained for each discipline/ instrument, e.g. FRSM (oboe), LRSM (bassoon), rather than listing all levels for all instruments? Anyway, yes I'd go for whichever syllabus would meet your learning/ development needs best, the one where you like the repertoire list or the structure best.


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#4 jpiano

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Posted 14 August 2015 - 21:56

I know people who teach more than one instrument and list their letters as, say, Dip ABRSM Piano teaching, Dip ABRSM clarinet performance. it's a little more wordy but useful and specific for prospective pupils as they can see exactly what you're qualified in. I'd agree, go for whichever syllabus you're going to gain the most from, and I wouldn't worry about which institution is awarding the diploma as a deciding factor.

 

Regarding post grade 8 motivation, it's an interesting one I'd say. Studying for a qualification can give an extra framework for learning, and a timescale which can be a motivator for some but a source of stress for others.. I'm a third of the way through studying for a second MA (not in music but I think the issue of postgrad study is the same in music)- I don't 'need' another degree but I really love the syllabus and there's no doubt it's getting me to read and tackle things that, in all honesty, I wouldn't get round to by myself as it's opening my eyes to areas in my subject that I didn't know about.  I want to do as well as I can because it's more fun that way- whether a qualification is necessary for that is an individual issue.


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#5 Martin.Walters

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Posted 21 August 2015 - 15:37

From my grade 7 piano opinion ... seeing people with letters before their names.. sometimes they have 2-3 lines of different letters that I can't even work out what they mean with out doing an hours research. 

The one loss if you do it for variation. You may not be pleased with what you have to study, the examining board.. 
The two gain I see.. if you do it, and your a teacher.. you will have better understanding what each board requires of you and you can pass that on to your students to gear them towards an exam syllabus. ~ But even that.. I don't know how "beneficial" it is.. than just reading the syllabus.. 
2nd .. I guess it's a good advertising point... though at such high level, there won't be much competition. 
 


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#6 Wai Kit Leung

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Posted 22 August 2015 - 09:20

My motivation is purely prestige and marketability (and return of investment). If it wasn't for the letters, I would rather prepare a recital on my own without paying the hefty exam fee.
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#7 zizi

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Posted 22 August 2015 - 11:37

I have been following this thread with interest, as I too am considering to work towards another diploma in not too distant future... (5 years, maybe...)  I have not even looked at any syllabus, but from what you say - motivation etc - you would like to add a diploma from the institutions other than ABRSM.  Trinity and London diplomas are well respected, so I would go for the repertoire you like to practise...  Best of luck!


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#8 jpiano

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Posted 22 August 2015 - 21:20

My motivation is purely prestige and marketability (and return of investment). If it wasn't for the letters, I would rather prepare a recital on my own without paying the hefty exam fee.

Just out of interest are you based in the UK? I just ask because I cannot imagine one extra set of letters being an additional marketing benefit here- and it is unlikely to produce an investment return, unless you are wanting to teach very advanced level bassoon - and even then, I'd think that most multi-instrumentalists will not hold a diploma in every instrument they teach. 


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#9 Wai Kit Leung

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Posted 22 August 2015 - 22:13


My motivation is purely prestige and marketability (and return of investment). If it wasn't for the letters, I would rather prepare a recital on my own without paying the hefty exam fee.

Just out of interest are you based in the UK? I just ask because I cannot imagine one extra set of letters being an additional marketing benefit here- and it is unlikely to produce an investment return, unless you are wanting to teach very advanced level bassoon - and even then, I'd think that most multi-instrumentalists will not hold a diploma in every instrument they teach.
I am in Hong Kong. Nowadays almost every child learns an instrument, so there are plenty of opportunities for teachers (less so for bassoon unfortunately). I just feel that my old Advanced Certificate may not be considered a diploma, and I may be more competitive if I get an L diploma.
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#10 jpiano

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Posted 23 August 2015 - 21:24

Ah, I did wonder- it sounded as if you might not be in the UK. If you are looking at the diploma from the viewpoint you mention then I think my first thing would be to think abut the demand for your bassoon teaching before justifying the expense of a diploma if your decision to take one is purely about competitive advantage. If it's personal learning, as welll, and you would enjoy tackling a new syllabus, then I'd go for the one you will enjoy. If I was a student looking for a specialist teacher for a more uncommon instrument, I'd be more interested that the qualification was specifically in that instrument, I wouldn't mind whether is was ABRSM, Trinity or LCM.


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#11 Wai Kit Leung

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Posted 23 August 2015 - 22:27

Lesson fees are actually very high in Hong Kong. The L diploma exam fee is about 14 hours of lessons at my current rate. I think it can be a worthwhile investment.
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#12 soccermom

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Posted 24 August 2015 - 14:58

If at least part of your motivation is about marketing yourself as a teacher, would it be more useful for your next diploma to be a teaching diploma rather than a performance one? 


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#13 Wai Kit Leung

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Posted 24 August 2015 - 21:18

If at least part of your motivation is about marketing yourself as a teacher, would it be more useful for your next diploma to be a teaching diploma rather than a performance one?

Very good point. I have indeed considered it. However:
1) I think I need an A or Dip teaching diploma before I can enter for a L diploma, which means extra time and money;
2) I do not have a bassoon student at the moment. I need to have a few for my portfolio for a teaching diploma;
3) I need to review my peer's lessons. I am not sure if my competitors are generous enough for me to sit in their lessons, particularly given that I am trying to get a certification in the process. Even if they are, space in Hong Kong is so limited, most teaching spaces are so cramped that they don't hold more than 2 people.
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