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Is it possible to apply for a dipABRSM without having a tutor?

Diploma dipABRSM piano tutoring

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#1 deemajor

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Posted 15 December 2013 - 11:37

If you're still not 18?

And even before applying, would studying for a diploma on your own be wise?

Just started researching it and having a bit of trouble finding a tutor.
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#2 Guest: Very Sane Tom_*

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Posted 15 December 2013 - 11:52

"Is it possible to apply for a dipABRSM without having a tutor?"

 

Yes

 

"would studying for a diploma on your own be wise?"

 

In most cases, No, but it depends on the individual ... powers of observation, aural skills, intellectual honesty, freedom from self-deception, level of motivation, ..

 

"having a bit of trouble finding a tutor."

 

That is not surprising.  Most private teachers have few, if any, students in the upper grades, and so are inexperienced in preparing students for a diploma.  Also many teachers do not have a diploma themselves. That does not stop them being good teachers ...  but not for you ... they could not even teach you to diploma level by remembering and adapting the way that they prepared. What is more if you are approaching diploma level then you may well be a better player, and know more about your instrument, than many teachers.  

 

The better you become, the harder it is to find a suitable teacher.  Unlike the Grade 1-5 player of a mainstream instrument you cannot rely on finding a suitable teacher in the town where you live.  You may have to travel, and you may have to pay a lot more for each lesson.

 

You may have more success if you approach your nearest conservatoire or University music department


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#3 BadStrad

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Posted 15 December 2013 - 12:14

It took nearly three years to find a suitable teacher and it takes a 90 minute drive each way for a lesson, but OH is happy to do that as the teacher is superb.
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#4 hummingbird

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Posted 15 December 2013 - 12:22

If you're still not 18?

And even before applying, would studying for a diploma on your own be wise?

Just started researching it and having a bit of trouble finding a tutor.


I don't know whereabouts you are but my diploma-holding teacher teaches diploma students [successfully, I might add!]. He's in Leeds - feel free to PM me if that's any good for you.
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#5 Ligneo Fistula

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Posted 15 December 2013 - 13:12

Is the dip the 'new' grade 8?  Seems like more and more young people are taking it - which is fantastic, of course.  Sorry, OP, can't help your enquiry but the very best for the future!


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#6 deemajor

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Posted 15 December 2013 - 13:14

Polkadot - I'm in Malta so it's not possible for me to have a teacher in Leeds, but thanks anyway. :)

One other thing I forgot to mention, let's say I found a tutor who had a diploma/was a licentiate with a school other than ABRSM, would they still be suitable tutors for someone who was studying for an ABRSM diploma? Since syllabus might differ a lot?
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#7 Guest: Very Sane Tom_*

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Posted 15 December 2013 - 13:20

One other thing I forgot to mention, let's say I found a tutor who had a diploma/was a licentiate with another school of music than ABRSM, would they still be suitable tutors for someone who was studying for an ABRSM diploma? Since syllabus might differ a lot?

 

Assuming that they know how to teach, as well as how to play, they should be fine.  The playing standard required by the diplomas is more or less the same for each of the boards.


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#8 Guest: Very Sane Tom_*

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Posted 15 December 2013 - 13:25

 

Is the dip the 'new' grade 8?  Seems like more and more young people are taking it - which is fantastic, of course.  Sorry, OP, can't help your enquiry but the very best for the future!


Not sure, I just did grade 8 and I've only started reading up on diplomas, but I don't think diplomas can be considered as grade 8 level.

and sincerely thank you :)

 

 

I do not think Ligneo Fistula was suggesting the Grade 8 and the diploma are at the same level.  It is that whereas Grade 8 used to be the standard achieved at a certain age, or when entering conservatoire,  these days it is the first Diploma (a MUCH higher standard) that plays that role.

 

On that basis you could even argue that the first Dip' is the "new Grade 5"  and that the Licentiate is the "new Grade 8"  ... at least if you base it on the playing standard of the first year piano students at the Utrecht conservatoire.


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#9 agricola

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Posted 17 December 2013 - 13:41

I studied for a diploma on my own and  I learned a great deal about technique and interpretation in the process.  However, if you can find a good teacher I would suggest having at least  occasional lessons from some one who could give you some feedback on whether you are meeting the required standard.


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