Jump to content


Photo

Piano teaching diploma advice sought

piano teaching diploma

  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 light

light

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 91 posts
  • Member: 887627
    Joined: 10-December 13

Posted 10 December 2013 - 13:20

I've seen many threads here about performance diplomas and repertroire but can't seem to find much about the teaching dilpomas and licentiate.

 

After a long pause of 25 years without a piano, I went back to it this year to get my Grade 8.

 

I want to teach piano, primarily from my home, but am unclear which diploma or teaching qualification I should take.

 

What I seem to be missing is any performance aspect of the Trinity or ABSRM diplomas.

Am I reading the syllabus incorrectly - it seems that for ATCL there is a beautifully extensive repertoire list, then there is the teaching instrumental/vocal diploma which contains no performance at all - just exerpts of the exam pieces up to Grade 6, to be able to demonstrate ability to teach these.

 

Also open to RIAM qualifications.

 

I'm looking for

1) the quickest entry into teaching (am aware that no qualifications needed, but want to start off well with good methods, owe it to the students)

2) a programme that will enable me to progress in my own playing, knowledge of music, interpretation etc)

3) a good starting knowledge of teaching techniques and confidence to do well by my prospective students

 

I'm open to doing a series of courses/examinations, but where to start to enable me to start teaching soon

e.g. the ATCL involves teaching experience, so I should start teaching as part of learning, but what about my own progression?

 

Of  course, the irony is that years ago I did teach a number of piano students who all progressed nicely. But now I want to set up as a piano teacher within a community and be able to do so with authority.

 

Would love some input to anyone who has or is involved in professional development for piano teaching.


  • 0

#2 Impressionist

Impressionist

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 864 posts
  • Member: 331311
    Joined: 08-October 11

Posted 10 December 2013 - 13:55

The teaching diplomas offered by AB, Trinity, LCM are a good benchmark to show that you can teach.  However they don't teach you how to teach which is a whole other ball game in my opinion.  I opted for the Cert PTC (EPTA qualification) because it was (a) piano specific and (b) it gives the opportunity to explore different methods and approaches for teaching, many of which I would never have encountered with the self-study required for a dipABRSM or ATCL.  (I may go on and take the LTCL teaching diploma in a couple of years.)  The course is also very good for developing your own skills in areas you might not have considered such as improvisation or playing by ear, and as you have to perform a piece of at least grade 6 standard you get useful input on performance and technical issues.  Although, like most courses it wasn't perfect, I certainly found it a useful learning experience and have grown my teaching practice from around 10 students to a full schedule and a waiting list.

 

You are right that there are no performance aspects for the teaching diplomas, although you do have to have grade 8 and be able to demonstrate pieces to grade 6 level.  If you want to consolidate your technical and performance skills then you could also look at doing a performance diploma.


  • 0

#3 Guest: Very Sane Tom_*

Guest: Very Sane Tom_*
  • Guests
  • Member: 0
    Joined: --

Posted 10 December 2013 - 14:30

<snip>
I opted for the Cert PTC (EPTA qualification) because it was (a) piano specific and (b) it gives the opportunity to explore different methods and approaches for teaching, many of which I would never have encountered with the self-study required for a dipABRSM or ATCL. 
<snip>

 
I second this recommendation.
 
I already had a performance diploma and a PGCE with Music as my teaching specialism, and had given piano lessons privately many years ago.  Nevertheless I also opted to take this course, rather than thinking I knew enough, and chose it in preference to one of the teaching diplomas (for the same reasons as Impressionist).
 
It is not perfect. I question assessment by four academic essays, when what is being developed is a practical, inter-personal skill.  But I cannot fault the course content or the excellent tutors and visiting lecturers.  It covers a huge range of subjects and material and it is well prepared and well presented.  We even had an afternoon with a top class dancer learning some of the dances of the Baroque period to get better insight into the musical forms of those days!
 
You can check out what is in the course at the EPTA website:


  • 0

#4 Hedgehog

Hedgehog

    Virtuoso

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 6582 posts
  • Member: 3747
    Joined: 25-May 05
  • Suburbia

Posted 10 December 2013 - 14:53

I did the CTABRSM which has similarities to the EPTA course and it is valuable to be able to interact (particularly as a pianist which can be a rather solitary existence) with other instrumental teachers.

 

I also, several years later, did the dipABRSM which is fine for what it is, but doesn't particularly help to develop your skills as a piano teacher.

 

I think you would do well to have a few pupils on the go before starting the EPTA course so that you have recent direct experience with pupils to relate to during the course.  You could also have a few piano lessons yourself in order to progress your own playing, and you will learn quite a bit from how another teacher teaches, especially at the higher level.


  • 0

#5 BitterSweet

BitterSweet

    Virtuoso

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2050 posts
  • Member: 37220
    Joined: 13-August 08
  • Edinburgh, Scotland

Posted 11 December 2013 - 09:08

I did my DipABRSM with a mentor-teacher, who kindly organised some practice teaching for me, and talked me through lots of things.

 

In terms of the performance aspect, I had to prepare 4 pieces from the current grade 6 syllabus, and I had to perform a small section of each of them as requested by the examiner. I sang unaccompanied and did no more than 8 or 10 bars for each. They did comment on my performance standard, but I don't think it was a large part of where I lost marks. The pieces are a springboard to discussion, so you might perform a section and then the examiner will ask "how might you introduce students to playing in Ab major?" or "what activities might help someone struggling with the semi-quavers here?"

 

The programme is not very important - you just want to pick pieces you're able to perform competently.

 

I would agree that your best options are either:

a) find a teacher who is experienced and willing to mentor you through the diplomas

b) choose a course like the CT ABRSM or EPTA where there is teaching built in

 

Then you just have to suck it up and take the plunge. Any teacher worth their salt will tell you that you just have to teach lots to get better at teaching.


  • 0

#6 light

light

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 91 posts
  • Member: 887627
    Joined: 10-December 13

Posted 22 December 2013 - 08:16

Thanks everyone for your replies.

 

Am mulling it all over.


  • 0

#7 staccato

staccato

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 321 posts
  • Member: 3167
    Joined: 20-February 05

Posted 22 December 2013 - 09:21

<snip>
I opted for the Cert PTC (EPTA qualification) because it was (a) piano specific and (b) it gives the opportunity to explore different methods and approaches for teaching, many of which I would never have encountered with the self-study required for a dipABRSM or ATCL. 
<snip>

 
I second this recommendation.
 
I already had a performance diploma and a PGCE with Music as my teaching specialism, and had given piano lessons privately many years ago.  Nevertheless I also opted to take this course, rather than thinking I knew enough, and chose it in preference to one of the teaching diplomas (for the same reasons as Impressionist).
 
It is not perfect. I question assessment by four academic essays, when what is being developed is a practical, inter-personal skill.  But I cannot fault the course content or the excellent tutors and visiting lecturers.  It covers a huge range of subjects and material and it is well prepared and well presented.  We even had an afternoon with a top class dancer learning some of the dances of the Baroque period to get better insight into the musical forms of those days!
 
You can check out what is in the course at the EPTA website:

When I did the course the academic essays were all based on practical work done with my pupils and also a lesson observation, so I think the method of assessment was very appropriate.
  • 0





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: piano, teaching, diploma