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Tea, Coffee & Lemonade


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#1 Ed the Tread.

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 12:35

I don't know if this has been covered before but another post in here reminded me to ask this question about teaching rhythm to young students.

I currently use the following names and I am interested if other teachers do.

Crotchet = tea
Two quavers = coffee
Four semi quavers = coca-cola
Two semi quavers followed by a quaver = lemonade
Quaver followed by two semi quavers = black current.
(I think I got the notation wording right blush.gif)

I don’t have a name for a dotted quaver followed by a semi quaver or any other combination of notes.

Any suggestions to increase my vocabulary would be appreciated?

If you have any alcoholic drink names for the above, my adult students will be grateful.

Cheers

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#2 ma non troppo

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 13:30

QUOTE(Ed the Tread. @ Mar 2 2010, 12:35 PM)  

I don't know if this has been covered before but another post in here reminded me to ask this question about teaching rhythm to young students.

I currently use the following names and I am interested if other teachers do.

Crotchet = tea
Two quavers = coffee
Four semi quavers = coca-cola
Two semi quavers followed by a quaver = lemonade
Quaver followed by two semi quavers = black current.
(I think I got the notation wording right blush.gif)

I don’t have a name for a dotted quaver followed by a semi quaver or any other combination of notes.

Any suggestions to increase my vocabulary would be appreciated?

If you have any alcoholic drink names for the above, my adult students will be grateful.

Cheers



Adults -
Crotchet - rum
Two quavers - brandy
Four semiquavers - dry martini
Two semi quavers followed by a quaver - demi sec
Quaver followed by two semi quavers - fall over
tongue.gif
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#3 fsharpminor

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 13:47

Four quavers/semiquavers ................... Gin and tonic !

Dotted quaver , 3 semis or dotted Crotchet , 3 quavers ............ Pint of Bitter
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#4 ma non troppo

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 13:50

Quaver, 2 semiquavers, 2 quavers: Totally legless tongue.gif
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#5 fsharpminor

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 14:16

Crotchet, crtochet, 2 qvuaers, cretchot ......... Three sheets to the wind
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#6 ma non troppo

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 14:24

QUOTE(fsharpminor @ Mar 2 2010, 02:16 PM)  

Crotchet, crtochet, 2 qvuaers, cretchot ......... Three sheets to the wind



Crotchet crotchet minim - one night staaannnd.....



This thread is great. party1.gif
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#7 Tixylix

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 17:06

I remember in primary school being taught crotchet = tea, two quavers = coffee and then the very bizarre use of minim = so-up. Soup only has one syllable, and I recall a 'diving' hand gesture being used to distinguish it from 'tea' when clapping rhythms, e.g. *clap* *clap-clap* *clap-dive*. Looking back on it, the music teaching in my primary school was quite bizarre...and that's saying nothing of the violin teacher who planned her lessons around using only Team Strings for the entire 4 years of junior school (it was a year before we started playing with the bow, by which time my mother was fed up with this and found me a new teacher).

Sorry, veered off there - but yes, tea cof-fee so-up was my introduction to rhythm. I'd maybe suggest 'choc-olate" for a minim as it's two fairly fluid syllables, although that may just be the West Country accent where it's pronounced more like 'choc-lit' unsure.gif
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#8 clavicembalo

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 17:11

QUOTE(Tixylix @ Mar 2 2010, 05:06 PM)  

I remember in primary school being taught crotchet = tea, two quavers = coffee and then the very bizarre use of minim = so-up. Soup only has one syllable, and I recall a 'diving' hand gesture being used to distinguish it from 'tea' when clapping rhythms, e.g. *clap* *clap-clap* *clap-dive*.


Following up on soup then: pea, chicken, tomato, minestrone, chicken & mushroom, ..... laugh.gif
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#9 Mini_mo

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 20:27

How about a name for a "quasihemidemisemiquaver" laugh.gif laugh.gif laugh.gif
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#10 Tixylix

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Posted 03 March 2010 - 07:41

QUOTE(Mini_mo @ Mar 2 2010, 08:27 PM)  

How about a name for a "quasihemidemisemiquaver" laugh.gif laugh.gif laugh.gif

How about meep? blink.gif
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#11 jacobvaneyck

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Posted 03 March 2010 - 19:17

Bob The Builder for dotted crotchet. Or Auld Lang Syne if they know that one.
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