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Geographical Ignorance :(


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#151 Violinia

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Posted 13 June 2008 - 23:26

QUOTE(BerkshireMum @ Jun 14 2008, 12:05 AM) View Post

I think my son's clarinet teacher has this right. If a pupil plays something really badly she will say, as you do, "I think you can do better than that - try again." But if it's just as bad the second time she will say, "That needs more work at home" in a tone that brooks no argument, and move on to something else.

I don't think kids respond well to being told off. They know quite well when they haven't practised, and if they've had a busy week they just feel resentful if you get cross. At the end of the day only they can decide whether or not to practise, and that's more likely to happen if you notice when they have worked on something, and praise them for it. The carrot is much better than the stick here, I think.


Oh good, glad you think so. I too suggest they carry on practising it at home if it doesn't come right after a couple of goes in the lesson. They seem to get the message at that point.

Yes I think you're right about telling them off for not practising - what's the point? If they want to practise they will, and vice versa. I think it's better to probe a bit and find out why they're not practising and then try and help them come up with solutions. This week I realised a formerly very enthusiastic pupil had slacked right off with her practice. We seemed to have reached a sort of deadlock and I asked her if she wanted to give up and the response was 'no! I love my violin lessons!' I responded with: 'well that's great but you do need to keep progressing, and if you don't practise you won't progress' etc and then asked what she doesn't like about practising.

It turned out how mother tells her she has to do half an hour a day and hovers about listening and making negative comments. No wonder the poor girl isn't enjoying it! She told me she'd much rather pick up the violin for 10 minutes here and there, maybe a couple of times a day (she keeps it on a stand so it's easy to get at). So we've come up with a new strategy: I'm going to call the mum and ask her to keep away from practice apart from some casual listening and occasional positive remarks about the good bits and no negative remarks about the dodgy bits.

Also, I told her (the child) not to have a fixed half hour regime, but practise until she feels she has improved the things she's working on. If she can do that in five minutes, great! If it takes longer, so be it. Every week I'm going to record her and we can compare recordings; when she makes some really good ones she can collect them and then make a cd to give to grannies/sell at school fundraising events. She brightened up hugely and sent me an email later that day to tell me she'd been practising loads since she got home from school! I know it's early days, but fingers crossed...

So in this case some honest communication and a strategy of no telling off seems hopefully to have turned things around.
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#152 BerkshireMum

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Posted 13 June 2008 - 23:50

You sound like the loveliest teacher, Violinia! That was obviously just the right way to deal with your pupil, and she will love you for it. smile.gif

Sometimes teachers seem to forget that they should be working with the pupil to help her/him to achieve, and think they need to be slavedrivers instead. People do best when they're working in a way that suits them as individuals, and seeing the progress they want to make. Some, because of other commitments, are happy to learn slowly, whereas others are desperate to become really good. The best teachers recognise this and don't push too hard - though lazy children may actually like to have a push from time to time!

Kids can be very sensitive to parental comments, but it's really hard as a parent not to say things occasionally! blush.gif My daughter used to hate it when I said anything, but son is always willing to consider any comments - often decides I'm talking rubbish though! I hope your pupil's mum can learn to bite her tongue better than I do! tongue.gif
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#153 jod

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Posted 14 June 2008 - 07:11

QUOTE(BerkshireMum @ Jun 14 2008, 12:50 AM) View Post

You sound like the loveliest teacher, Violinia! That was obviously just the right way to deal with your pupil, and she will love you for it. smile.gif

Sometimes teachers seem to forget that they should be working with the pupil to help her/him to achieve, and think they need to be slavedrivers instead. People do best when they're working in a way that suits them as individuals, and seeing the progress they want to make. Some, because of other commitments, are happy to learn slowly, whereas others are desperate to become really good. The best teachers recognise this and don't push too hard - though lazy children may actually like to have a push from time to time!

Kids can be very sensitive to parental comments, but it's really hard as a parent not to say things occasionally! blush.gif My daughter used to hate it when I said anything, but son is always willing to consider any comments - often decides I'm talking rubbish though! I hope your pupil's mum can learn to bite her tongue better than I do! tongue.gif


agree.gif This is what often comes screaming out of Violinia's posts. Her concern for the geographical knowledge of 14 year olds is a concern for the whole person and not just the bit of them that plays the violin.

This sometimes polarises the opinions of the rest of us. However, it is clear it comes from someone who is very motivated in her work, and deeply caring.

Jo.

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#154 Guest: The Old Lady_*

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Posted 14 June 2008 - 10:42

QUOTE(Violinia @ Jun 14 2008, 12:13 AM) View Post

QUOTE(Wobby @ Jun 13 2008, 11:53 PM) View Post

[Are you sure that it wasn't meant to be intentional - as a joke to indicate how badly the nurses write? I saw it too, but was fairly confident that she wouldn't have made that many mistakes (i.e. "youngests'", "Barry and I", "grammer", "form", "nurses", "These nurss have to have GCSE's, some of them have dergrees") by accident (at least I hope not, anyway wink.gif)! biggrin.gif


[/font][/size]~Wobby~


Oh gawd I think I fell for it! wacko.gif


You certainly did laugh.gif laugh.gif laugh.gif
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#155 Violinia

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Posted 14 June 2008 - 21:44

QUOTE(BerkshireMum @ Jun 14 2008, 12:50 AM) View Post

You sound like the loveliest teacher, Violinia! That was obviously just the right way to deal with your pupil, and she will love you for it. smile.gif

Sometimes teachers seem to forget that they should be working with the pupil to help her/him to achieve, and think they need to be slavedrivers instead. People do best when they're working in a way that suits them as individuals, and seeing the progress they want to make. Some, because of other commitments, are happy to learn slowly, whereas others are desperate to become really good. The best teachers recognise this and don't push too hard - though lazy children may actually like to have a push from time to time!

Kids can be very sensitive to parental comments, but it's really hard as a parent not to say things occasionally! blush.gif My daughter used to hate it when I said anything, but son is always willing to consider any comments - often decides I'm talking rubbish though! I hope your pupil's mum can learn to bite her tongue better than I do! tongue.gif


Thanks for your kind comments. I don't think I was a very good teacher in the beginning ( a few years back) but especially since the CT course I find myself putting more and more into it and enjoying it more and more. I'm also constantly amazed at how much I love working with children when I used to be a bit afraid of them rolleyes.gif (till I had my own I suppose). Children can be so fantastic and so rewarding to work with - I love their energy and humour. Yesterday at String Group in one of the schools I teach in, we were all having lunch together and the conversation turned to politics and capitalism and got quite sparky and shouty (one of them said to me afterwards it was the best String Group lunch ever) - yet just a few short years ago they were mostly all Y7s talking about their pets or something - they've all grown up so much and it's so fascinating to watch.

I feel truly privileged to be around these amazing kids and have the opportunity to watch them grow and develop.

Re parents holding back, funnily enough I spoke to this mum a few months back and she told me how she so wanted her daughter to enjoy the violin and didn't care about exams or anything 'just as long as she carries on enjoying the violin'... now apparently she's hovering around being all hyper-critical, but I understand this too well having been the mum of a sax-learning child myself not too long ago and knowing all the psychological theory but finding it so hard to keep out of it when I knew he was playing something wrong. My mum (now 88) tells me she knew she should have kept out of it when I was practising the violin but just couldn't help calling out a pained 'ouch!' from time to time.

Mums, eh?!?

And thanks Jo for your kind comments too - you've made me feel all warm inside.. smile.gif
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#156 Tortellini

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Posted 30 September 2019 - 16:50

For some reason this old thread came up while I was looking for tips on memorising scales.  :lol:  I see that the link to the quiz no longer works so I thought I would add this one:

https://www.sporcle.com/games/g/world

 

Be warned - it is rather addictive! It has, however, greatly improved my geographical knowledge.


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#157 Gordon Shumway

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Posted 01 October 2019 - 16:06

In his Himalaya series Michael Palin asks some Mongolian nomads if they know where Britain is, and they wonder if it might be somewhere near Moscow, an ignorance I can understand and accept!


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#158 Dr. Rogers

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Posted 01 October 2019 - 16:10

In his Himalaya series Michael Palin asks some Mongolian nomads if they know where Britain is, and they wonder if it might be somewhere near Moscow, an ignorance I can understand and accept!

 

One of my favourite documentary series of all time!  "Himalaya: the highest form of entertainment"


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