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Recorder Thread!


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#4021 elemimele

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Posted Yesterday, 15:10

If you'd just written Telemann's 2nd flute fantasie, would you ever dare put pen to paper again? It's perfect.


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#4022 AdLibitum

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Posted Yesterday, 17:51


a handmade Ganassi in autumn


If you haven't seen it already, Philippe Bolton's website has lots of excellent information about recorders in general. There's a page on ganassi recorders here: http://www.flute-a-b...-sam-135gb.html and one about bore evolution more generally here: http://www.flute-a-b...ionpercegb.html
That's really interesting. I am leaning towards a Ganassi simply because I like the sound of those played in various YouTube videos, but I didn't know much about the history.
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#4023 elemimele

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Posted Yesterday, 18:45

Sound is a very good reason to lean towards a particular instrument.

I wonder whether the 20th C pursuit of a Ganassi recorder was a result of thinking from a modern perspective? The modern player who picks up an early instrument feels its limitations because they know that with modification it could play a much larger range, and that a lot of music has been written that it can't play. The player back in history didn't know what was to come, and had an instrument with as good a range as any, and that could play anything that had been written, so why would he want more?

Presumably if Ganassi knew some high fingerings, he wasn't alone, and others would have known them too (certainly if they'd read Ganassi). But no one composed using them. That suggests strongly that no composer of any significance thought those notes were of any value.

Strangely, as well as the sound value, I'm now curious about those "Ganassi" instruments anyway, just to know what they're like to play, because even if they're not historically accurate for the Renaissance, they're now historically interesting in the rediscovery of the recorder. And in any case, any instrument that's been made with care by a skilled maker is something of value, something of interest, and worth exploring. 


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#4024 old_and_grumpy

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Posted Today, 13:28

If you'd just written Telemann's 2nd flute fantasie, would you ever dare put pen to paper again? It's perfect.

 

I shall make sure I listen to it!  I very much "grew up" with the view that Telemann was just a sort of poor imitation of Bach, and his contemporaries had got it all wrong, but I have come to know his music better over the last few years and he wrote a lot of excellent stuff and some real gems.


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#4025 old_and_grumpy

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Posted Today, 13:40

> I am leaning towards a Ganassi simply because I like the sound

 

I generally prefer the sound of pre-baroque recorders, and I like the simple lines of them too.

Obviously it's all subjective.  When I attended Jacqueline Sorel's recorder maintenance workshop, I took my Moeck Hotteterre tenor along; it's a (reproduction) baroque instrument but it's early baroque and has a wider and slightly less cylindrical bore than later baroque instruments and I like its tone whereas Jacqueline clearly did not.

Personally, I'm not bothered about authenticity (eg playing 16th century music on a 17th century (style) instrument) is fine by me if I enjoy it.


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