Jump to content


Photo

Recorder Thread!


  • Please log in to reply
3754 replies to this topic

#3751 elemimele

elemimele

    Prodigy

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1240 posts
  • Member: 895612
    Joined: 17-July 16

Posted 04 November 2019 - 12:48

ooh, yes, I see what you mean. It's a bit odd that Wikipedia specifically mentions it as being used in the making of recorders - it's not a wood that's advertised by anyone who makes recorders, so if the statement is true, it must refer to generic wooden recorders of the paint-with-orange-glaze era. Does anyone know what the cheap hohner recorders are made of? From memory, they look darker than lime.

I think whoever mentioned finger-nails was probably right. It's a beautifully easy wood to cut with great accuracy, even for small details, but it's not very hard.


  • 0

#3752 Zixi

Zixi

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 358 posts
  • Member: 895683
    Joined: 08-August 16

Posted 04 November 2019 - 17:24

I hadn't thought of the 'generic' as an explanation! I like that one!

 

As an aside, thanks for the desert island music suggestions, elemimele and oag!


  • 0

#3753 elemimele

elemimele

    Prodigy

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1240 posts
  • Member: 895612
    Joined: 17-July 16

Posted 09 November 2019 - 23:18

Sarah Jeffery has very bravely posted a bit of flute-reminiscence. She spent her teenage years progressing through flute to become quite a decent player before breaking her thumb, changing course, and never looking back at it. It was interesting to hear her thoughts about flute and recorder, and it made me think. I'd imagine every flute player in the world began with a recorder, so there must be plenty who can compare the two. And yet there are not many who excel at both. There are quite a few who can play both at a professional level (Annabel Knight for example) but most seem to excel on one or the other. It's a bit like my favourite ocarina player, Vera Unfried, who I know can also play a recorder very well, and yet on ocarina she excites me - on recorder she's pretty decent but doesn't make my blood fizz like she can on an ocarina. There are exceptions who genuinely excel; Francois Lazarevitch overflows with terrifying skill and taste on both.

Is it really hard to be good at flute and recorder? Are they so different that being good on one makes it hard to be good at the other? Do they need different personalities? Do their techniques get in the way of each other?


  • 0

#3754 old_and_grumpy

old_and_grumpy

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 204 posts
  • Member: 889252
    Joined: 27-October 14

Posted 10 November 2019 - 10:23

I used to swim a lot, and was doing so when Michael Phelps got his first big haul of olympic medals.  I remember that at the time there were people who virtually accused him of cheating because he had incredibly big feet which worked like flippers and gave him an "unfair" advantage.  Of course nobody really thought it was cheating, but it did give an advantage, and all other things being equal, no amount of training would ever result in growing bigger feet.

I mention the swimming thing just because it's simple and clear cut - I've just looked up Michael Phelps and he apparently has size 14 feet plus an arm span of 2 metres and it's easy to measure these things, if less easy to quantify their exact benefit.

When it comes to someone like Mozart, nothing can be measured, yet most people would agree that he had some sort of very special talent that no amount of study or training would ever bring most people anywhere near.

In a rather roundabout way, that brings me to my point: I think you have to have real talent to excel on an instrument (I will never be a Bosgraaf or a Petri no matter how much I might try).  Some people seem to be fortunate enough that they can excel on more than one instrument, but maybe that is simply a rarer talent than being able to excel on just the one. 


  • 0

#3755 elemimele

elemimele

    Prodigy

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1240 posts
  • Member: 895612
    Joined: 17-July 16

Posted 10 November 2019 - 11:45

yup, Annabel Knight is quite special too on a flute. It was quite funny to see Sarah Jeffery's reassessment of the flute from the point of view of a recorder player - what's all that keywork for, and why are you scared of open finger holes? 


  • 0