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26 Italian Songs And Arias.


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#1 Lixandreth

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Posted 06 March 2007 - 01:52

Okay, I have the yellow 24 Italian Songs and Arias book. As part of my A Level Recital (Meep, Thursday!!!), I'm singing Non Posso Disperar which 24ISAA says is by De Luca.
However, my teacher has the purple 26ISAA which says it's Bononcini. I need to write programme notes pretty sharpish and I'm not sure which composer to put down...

Also, if anybody has 26ISAA, would they be really really lovely and write out what it says about the piece in there?! I remember thinking it would be useful for programme notes but my teacher has been in America the past few weeks so can't nab her copy!!

Thanks very much guys.
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#2 possom

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Posted 07 March 2007 - 12:11

Sorry, only have the same book as you sad.gif
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#3 Guest: petrat_*

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Posted 07 March 2007 - 13:21

Sorry for the slow reply. I am almost certain that I have the purple copy. I will pop down to the studio in a few minutes and check.
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#4 Guest: petrat_*

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Posted 07 March 2007 - 14:05

Yep, got it!
John Glenn Paton, the editor writes:

Background
Bononcini, a young man from Modena, arrived in Rome during the reign of a tolerent pope, when the famous Tordinona Theater was operating. For his debut in Rome he provided aditional arias that were sung in an already existing opera: "Non posso disperar" was sung in Eraclea by Antonio Draghi. The Tordinona closed soon afterward, but Bononcini found work in a noble Roman house-hold.
This aria confirms a modern scholar's statement that "harmonically, Bononcini was a bold innovator, and his music is spiced with unusual dissonances and rapid modulations which horrified many of his contemporaries."
(H. C. Wolff. New Oxford History of Music, vol 5 page75.)

Sources
There are three manuscript sources for this aria, all in the handwriting of the same professional copyist: (1) Arie della commedia del ratto delle sabbine, Barberini latini 4161, Biblioteca apostolica vaticana, Vatican City;
(2) no title, Barberini latini 4164, same library; and (3) no title, G393, Biblioteca musicale governativa del Conservatorio de Musica "S. Cecilia." For voice (soprano clef) and continuo. Original key: G minor with one flat/ Sources (1) and (2) both confirm that the composer was Bononcini. Source (3) which names no composer was edited by Parisotti in Aria Antiche, vol 2 (Milan; Ricordi, 1890). He took a wrong quess and named the composer as Severo de Luca, who composed other arias in source (3). The familiar edition, therefore, gives the wrong composer's name; it also uses bombastic fortissimos and inserts incorrect accidentals into m31 and m32. Bononcini's use of a quickly fleeting Neapolitan harmony is authentic and is typical of his style.


Right, you had better pass it after all of that! laugh.gif Best of luck.


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#5 jod

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Posted 07 March 2007 - 17:19

QUOTE(petrat @ Mar 7 2007, 02:05 PM) View Post

Yep, got it!
John Glenn Paton, the editor writes:

Background
Bononcini, a young man from Modena, arrived in Rome during the reign of a tolerent pope, when the famous Tordinona Theater was operating. For his debut in Rome he provided aditional arias that were sung in an already existing opera: "Non posso disperar" was sung in Eraclea by Antonio Draghi. The Tordinona closed soon afterward, but Bononcini found work in a noble Roman house-hold.
This aria confirms a modern scholar's statement that "harmonically, Bononcini was a bold innovator, and his music is spiced with unusual dissonances and rapid modulations which horrified many of his contemporaries."
(H. C. Wolff. New Oxford History of Music, vol 5 page75.)

Sources
There are three manuscript sources for this aria, all in the handwriting of the same professional copyist: (1) Arie della commedia del ratto delle sabbine, Barberini latini 4161, Biblioteca apostolica vaticana, Vatican City;
(2) no title, Barberini latini 4164, same library; and (3) no title, G393, Biblioteca musicale governativa del Conservatorio de Musica "S. Cecilia." For voice (soprano clef) and continuo. Original key: G minor with one flat/ Sources (1) and (2) both confirm that the composer was Bononcini. Source (3) which names no composer was edited by Parisotti in Aria Antiche, vol 2 (Milan; Ricordi, 1890). He took a wrong quess and named the composer as Severo de Luca, who composed other arias in source (3). The familiar edition, therefore, gives the wrong composer's name; it also uses bombastic fortissimos and inserts incorrect accidentals into m31 and m32. Bononcini's use of a quickly fleeting Neapolitan harmony is authentic and is typical of his style.


Right, you had better pass it after all of that! laugh.gif Best of luck.


I have the Glen Paton Edition too and recomend it. It contains word-by-word and poetic translations, and a phonetic transcription of the text. It also has composer and historical source material for all of the arias.

Even if you currently have another edition it is worthwhile buying this one for the background info. Especially if you are preparing for A level or writing any programme notes or performance commentary.
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#6 Val_alto

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Posted 07 March 2007 - 20:27

QUOTE(jod @ Mar 7 2007, 05:19 PM) View Post


I have the Glen Paton Edition too and recomend it. It contains word-by-word and poetic translations, and a phonetic transcription of the text. It also has composer and historical source material for all of the arias.

Even if you currently have another edition it is worthwhile buying this one for the background info. Especially if you are preparing for A level or writing any programme notes or performance commentary.


I agree. Another good reason for buying the Glenn Paton edition is that the rather florid accompaniments (sp?) of the "yellow peril" have been edited to a more "authentic" style that I prefer.
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