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Glasses for pianists


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#16 Banjogirl

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Posted 27 October 2019 - 18:54


I have expensive top quality varifocals which work for everything. They're amazing. It's like getting the perfect eyesight I never had. My problem these days when playing the piano is not that anything is out of focus but when looking from keyboard to music my brain just seems to take a fraction of a second too long to work out what I'm doing!

I had progressive lenses almost from the time they were invented and for distance, reading and even for the piano they were no problem. But over the years my eyesight has changed and although my present prescription works for almost everything it is useless for the piano. When I explained the problem to my optician she said that the newest (and most expensive) progressive lenses would solve the problem. but they haven't.. So I am asking Banjogirl if she has any specific make of lenses. Interestingly I don't have any problem when using my computer. I can read the screen and type and when I look from one to the other I don't have the blurring problem that I get when playing the piano. Can anyone suggest why?

Not a specific make, just the ones with the widest area of variation, or whatever it is that costs so much. I'm VERY short sighted but my near sight is still pretty good, so there's a huge difference. My optician was actually very surprised that I got on so well with them, and my husband was convinced I would fall down the stairs. It's only playing the piano which is any kind of problem and, as I said, it's nothing to do with not being able to see, it's aged brain! I must just be lucky that my brain was at least able to adapt well to the varifocals.
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#17 Aquarelle

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Posted 27 October 2019 - 19:43

Thank you Banjogirl. And I'm sure your brain is not "aged"! Probably, like mine - has too much work to do!


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#18 Banjogirl

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Posted 27 October 2019 - 21:36

Thank you Banjogirl. And I'm sure your brain is not "aged"! Probably, like mine - has too much work to do!


Lol. Maybe it needs a more regular workout!
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#19 jenny

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Posted 27 October 2019 - 21:46

The best she could offer me were a pair of second glasses with a longer focal length than my reading specs. These work well for playing, however when teaching, the focal length from sitting to the side of the pupil to the music desk is longer again so still a problem. I need 3 pairs of glasses to switch between: 1 for writing in notebooks, 1 for demonstrating a technique and 1 for looking at a pupil’s music when they’re playing!!

 

I have the same problem but I just can't be bothered to keep changing glasses! I seem to manage fairly well using my varifocals for teaching, although I can't see small details well from the side and have to sometimes lean closer. I also seem to manage okay with writing in my notebook during the lesson. So I only put on my 'piano' glasses when I'm practising, and occasionally if I'm playing a tricky duet part with a pupil. 


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#20 anonymousalto

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Posted 29 October 2019 - 14:21

 I need 3 pairs of glasses to switch between: 1 for writing in notebooks, 1 for demonstrating a technique and 1 for looking at a pupil’s music when they’re playing!!

I nearly always have my own copy of what the student is playing, so that I can follow easily, as my reading glasses don't help when sitting beside a student at the piano.


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