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The worst "trial" lesson ever


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#1 Boogaloo

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Posted 10 December 2019 - 16:29

Hi all, I'm so shaky after just starting a trial lesson and I'm teaching again in a few minutes but need to offload - really sorry. I've just had a booking for a trial with a 5 1/2 year old. I was kind of manipulated into doing this sooner than I otherwise would have done as they want to get replacement lessons sorted before Christmas - this boy's teacher is moving away from the area. I, in the end, kindly agreed to trial at 4pm today when I only get in from school at 3.45 then teach until 7 (I started at 8am with no break!). So I'm grabbing my lunch and the doorbell goes at 3.50. Then, the child, grandparent, and who I later find out to be the parent want the child to use the toilet. I agree that he can but ask them to afterwards wait in the car and we rejig the time until 4.05. The child barged in and charged into the loo, was rude to his grandmother and from this point I knew I had a problem. They came back at 4.05, the child as good as marched into my teaching room, got his book out and started playing whilst the grandmother was controlling things by telling me what he's already done (I did manage to ascertain in my hall just who was who). She then asked me what they should do and I said that what normally happens is that I invite people in and to sit down, I chat through my T & Cs and find out some info about them then I invite the child to play etc.. They at this point decided that I was very rude, stormed out and said they would never recommend me to anyone and I should stop advertising. It's obviously shaken me up.

 

Anyone else had any really bad experiences like this? I'm never going to do a trial without someone else in my house again.


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#2 Allegro3355

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Posted 10 December 2019 - 16:37

Hi all, I'm so shaky after just starting a trial lesson and I'm teaching again in a few minutes but need to offload - really sorry. I've just had a booking for a trial with a 5 1/2 year old. I was kind of manipulated into doing this sooner than I otherwise would have done as they want to get replacement lessons sorted before Christmas - this boy's teacher is moving away from the area. I, in the end, kindly agreed to trial at 4pm today when I only get in from school at 3.45 then teach until 7 (I started at 8am with no break!). So I'm grabbing my lunch and the doorbell goes at 3.50. The, the child, grandparent, and who I later find out to be the parent want the child to use the toilet. I agree that he can but ask them to afterwards wait in the car and we rejig the time until 4.05. The child barged in and charged into the loo, was rude to his grandmother and from this point I knew I had a problem. They cam back at 4.05, the child as good as marched into my teaching room, got his book out and started playing whilst the grandmother was controlling things by telling me what he's already done (I did manage to ascertain in my hall just who was who). She then asked me what they do and I said that what normally happens is that invite people in and to sit down, I chat through my T & cs and find out some info about them then I invite the child to play etc.. They at this point decided that I was very rude, stormed out and said they would never recommend me to anyone and I should stop advertising. It's obviously shaken me up.

 

Anyone else had any really bad experiences like this? I'm never going to do a trial without someone else in my house again.

 

Yikes!! You poor thing. Don't worry, everyone has days like this. By the sounds of it you didn't so anything wrong and there is line to the type of behaviour you have to accept in your own house.


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#3 Banjogirl

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Posted 10 December 2019 - 17:23

Some people are just horrible. That sounds like a very unpleasant experience.
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#4 maggiemay

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Posted 10 December 2019 - 17:37

Goodness me - I’m so sorry you had to go through that.  I ‘ve had some interesting ones, but nothing quite as awful as that. 

 

I can’t for the life of me see why they thought you were rude. I wonder whether they were embarrassed by the child’s behaviour, and it was their way of ‘saving face’. 

 

Just be thankful that you found out before actually taking him on! 


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#5 Norway

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Posted 10 December 2019 - 17:38

You dodged a bullet there Boogaloo! I wonder if the boy's previous teacher really was "moving away from the area!"

 

Reminds me of a trial lesson I had - boy (aged 12) put his feet (clad in outdoor shoes) up on my cushions. I waited to see if the mother said anything but she didn't. Luckily they didn't ring back!


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#6 ma non troppo

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Posted 10 December 2019 - 17:48

I think you dodged a bullet too. I'm afraid that when they told you you were rude, I would have pointed out that the reverse was true. I would have also told them the child was not ready to start lessons until they learnt to behave. If there was a threat of bad mouthing you I may have implied that I would also be warning other local teachers about them as clients.

I bet you never hear anything of them though - the chances are they are well known for this kind of thing. I reckon the other teacher didn't move away as well.
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#7 Misterioso

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Posted 10 December 2019 - 18:01

Boogaloo, what a horrible thing to happen. I'm not surprised you're feeling shaken up. Agree with what others have said about the other teacher not moving away. Rest assured that you retain the moral high ground here.

:thereThere:


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#8 elemimele

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Posted 10 December 2019 - 18:38

Anyone who knows them, even in the most cursory of manners, if they hear how awful you were, will be giggling to themselves in secret sympathy for you. Do not worry. You have been spared a hellish experience from here onwards.


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#9 Boogaloo

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Posted 10 December 2019 - 18:57

Thank you all for your support. I forgot to say that whilst in the hall the boy couldn't actually speak to me as he had food in his mouth. He then put his fingers in his mouth. I invited him to go and wash his hands. He asked why and I said because he was about to play my piano and I didn't want food out of his mouth on it. I reckon that didn't go down too well either. I know I've dodged a bullet and immediately sent a message to all of my piano teacher friends in the area to warn them. We all need to look out for each other. They actually shouted and stormed out of my house. I had the final satisfaction of slamming the front door on them as they were so utterly rude. Thankfully my Christmas wreath stayed put  :rofl:

 

If anyone lives in the Wolverhampton area and needs a heads up on who this might be then feel free to PM me!


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#10 ten left thumbs

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Posted 10 December 2019 - 20:38

Wow, what a 'lesson'! Rest assured, there's not many like that. At least these were easy to spot. Glad it's over, now you can relax, or at least get on with your proper work, with students and parents to know how to behave.


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#11 jenny

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Posted 10 December 2019 - 21:02

This is such shocking behaviour! It must have been really difficult for you to do the rest of your teaching afterwards - I can imagine you were very shaken up by this.

It's always easy to think afterwards what you could have said but you were totally unprepared for such an onslaught! I am so sorry you had to experience this and hope such a thing never happens again. The worst that has happened to me in a trial lesson was a girl who started jumping around on the sofa in my piano room while her mother was there. I did take her on and she is still with me (and doing well), but she is quite challenging!


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#12 Aquarelle

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Posted 10 December 2019 - 21:17

Boogaloo I am speechless. How can people be like that? Don't worry about it. They just have to be well known  for this kind of thing and I too strongly  suspect that the original teacher did not move house..It will be interesting to see if you get any feedback from those you have warned. So  sorry you had to cope with this. All the berst for the rest of this term.


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#13 BabyGrand

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Posted 10 December 2019 - 21:28

Goodness Boogaloo!  What a horrible experience.  No wonder you're shaken up - I think you did amazingly well to be able to carry on teaching.  

 

I've nothing to add to what everyone else has said, but can offer hugs  :grouphug: .  I would offer chocolate too, but you're a bit far.  However, feel free to have some on my behalf.  

 

Oh, and I think what you've said is wise - I also don't meet new students without someone else in the house, and if I'm at all unsure, I try to have someone around for the next few lessons as well.  Letting strangers into our homes leaves us very vulnerable.  

 

Take care.  


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#14 jpiano

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Posted 10 December 2019 - 22:08

I think you dodged a bullet too. I'm afraid that when they told you you were rude, I would have pointed out that the reverse was true. I would have also told them the child was not ready to start lessons until they learnt to behave. If there was a threat of bad mouthing you I may have implied that I would also be warning other local teachers about them as clients.

I bet you never hear anything of them though - the chances are they are well known for this kind of thing. I reckon the other teacher didn't move away as well.

Yes to everything ma non troppo has said. Must admit my first thought was that the moving away story was suspicious! What a horrible experience, no wonder you feel shaken up. But thank goodness they showed their true colours at the very beginning before you took the child on. Some people just amaze me with their total and utter sense of entitlement and idea that they can be as rude as they like and treat everywhere as if it were part of their own living room. Plus some people are just plain horrible.  I'd go and have a large glass of wine or a huge cup of hot chocolate or tea and just be pleased you'll never see them again. 


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#15 BadStrad

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Posted 10 December 2019 - 22:28

I've nothing to really add to what others have said, but wanted to say well done on keeping cool and getting through the experience. Best of luck with future trial lessons and new students.


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