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Has anyone ever tried to be conned by a music shop


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#1 adultpianist

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Posted 01 May 2021 - 21:43

I was thinking of upgrading my flute with a solid silver head joint.   The shop where i got my existing flute said oh yes we can sell you one for £800.   

 

They did not ask me what grade I was at.   I have since found out that you do not need an upgrade until you are at least grade 4 standard.

 

Good job I did some homework and asked other people beause they said you do not need an upgrade until you are playing things that you current flute cannot cope with

 

:crying:

 

Adultpianist cannot be fooled lol


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#2 Banjogirl

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Posted 01 May 2021 - 22:31

I'm not sure I understand the situation. It sounds as if you went in and asked about head joints and they gave you a price. Isn't that what you wanted? Or did you ask their advice about which one to get?
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#3 adultpianist

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Posted 01 May 2021 - 22:51

I did not go in.   I phoned them.   I told them I wanted to get a solid siler headjoint and that I was not exactly an intermediate player yet but heading towards that direction.   I had not even started doing scales.   The woman on the phone said to me it is not a matter of how good you are, it is a matter of whether you want a good sound.    She went on to say that even a beginner who wants a solid silver headjoint can have one.  I think she was just trying to make a sale.   This video i found says otherwise

 


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#4 BadStrad

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Posted 01 May 2021 - 23:20

The woman on the phone said to me it is not a matter of how good you are, it is a matter of whether you want a good sound. She went on to say that even a beginner who wants a solid silver head joint can have one. I think she was just trying to make a sale. This video I found says otherwise.

I'm not sure why you think you were being conned. If a customer wants a particular instrument or head joint why shouldn't she sell them that? She didn't say you needed the new equipment, only that you could have it if you wanted it. What's wrong with that? You can have an instrument you might grow out of as a player or an instrument you can grow into. Either approach is fine if it suits your budget.
As for the video - I wouldn't put too much store by it. It's basically an advert.
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#5 adultpianist

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Posted 01 May 2021 - 23:37

Banjo lets agree to disagree.    


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#6 EllieD

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Posted 02 May 2021 - 07:56

If someone is genuinely serious about improving, they will need an instrument that's a good bit better than they are! Which is why it's always useful to have someone with you who is better than you to try instruments out. If I were a grade 2 flautist but had made rapid progress, was enjoying the flute, and had every intention of improving, and had the cash to spare, I would have no problem in buying whatever head joint I fancied. There are no hard and fast rules. I hope that the piano I will hopefully buy in a few months will be far better than me and I will never be able to realise its full capabilities, so that it will never limit what I want to do. 


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#7 elemimele

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Posted 02 May 2021 - 09:47

I'm not sure it's helpful to take the internet advice (or even a teacher's advice) as a hard rule with no exceptions. The world is not as black-and-white as that. The advice that you do not need a solid silver head-joint until you are grade X, or that you do not need to upgrade your instrument until it is holding you back, was probably given in the context of cash-strapped parents or anxious players, who'd rather not be buying another instrument, and need reassurance that they can still get plenty of mileage from the instrument they have. It doesn't mean you must not buy better. It just means you are not obliged to buy better now: you can put it off for a year or two if you want.

There are also plenty of people who enjoy owning and playing a nice instrument, and there is absolutely nothing wrong with that. The recorder world is full of people who enjoy playing a beautiful wooden instrument, even though they'd be the first to admit that technically they're nowhere near the level where they can extract from it all of its beauty. But I think many would be upset if a shop refused to sell them anything better than a £30 Yamaha plastic on the grounds that the plastic recorder is quite adequate for their grade. We have the right to buy a nice instrument if we've got the cash in our pocket. And it rarely does any harm to have an instrument that's a bit too good.

So if you want a better flute and can afford it, go for it. Shops will advise on what will make your flute better. They will probably advise (if asked) on the suitability of an instrument for a particular person's physique and intended use, but they'll assume you know what you're doing, and they won't intrude in your personal decision about when to upgrade. They aren't there to be judgemental.


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#8 Banjogirl

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Posted 02 May 2021 - 13:38

Banjo lets agree to disagree.


I didn't disagree with you. I said I didn't understand what the problem was because they only seemed to have done what you asked them.
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#9 adultpianist

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Posted 02 May 2021 - 13:46

I could very well go out and buy a solid silver head joint but I have looked online and you can buy them cheaper than £800.  I have seen them advertised for £400 or £600 whih would be better for me price wise

 

I was also advised to ditch my closed hole flute in favour of an open holed flute

 

I have had my flute for about 3 years and it has never had a servie so first I might do that and see how it sounds after that


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#10 vron

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Posted 02 May 2021 - 14:38

Musical instruments ( and in this case the head joint)  are like everything else. They have a range in price which will differ depending on make and the seller. There is no hard and fast rule for a price.

 

It is a good idea to have your flute serviced first and see how you feel then.

 

If you decide to go ahead and my a new headjoint you need need to try out a few on your flute and see which ones you find easy to play and like the sound of. They can have different cuts of embouchure. Some may suit you and some not.


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#11 barry-clari

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Posted 02 May 2021 - 17:35

I was also advised to ditch my closed hole flute in favour of an open holed flute


Ooo : be very careful before going down that route. I play, and have always played, on closed hole flutes and have no intention whatsoever to go open hole. Get a second opinion before considering open holes.
Will stand to be corrected, but I believe long time forum flute luminary andante_in_c is also a closed hole flautist.
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#12 gemmasue

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Posted 02 May 2021 - 17:42

Could you go to a store and try out different flutes. I thought I would want an open hole, but really didn’t like it when I tried one. Bear in mind that you have to have good hand position to be able to cover holes fully. Also, open hole doesn’t mean better flute. Some people just like the feeling.

Definitely agree with hose who say wait until you’ve serviced your current flute. It’ll probably come back feeling like a different instrument!!
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#13 Cyrilla

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Posted 02 May 2021 - 21:53

The recorder world is full of people who enjoy playing a beautiful wooden instrument, even though they'd be the first to admit that technically they're nowhere near the level where they can extract from it all of its beauty. But I think many would be upset if a shop refused to sell them anything better than a £30 Yamaha plastic on the grounds that the plastic recorder is quite adequate for their grade. We have the right to buy a nice instrument if we've got the cash in our pocket. And it rarely does any harm to have an instrument that's a bit too good.

 

 

Yup.   I'm one of those recorder players who takes great joy in possessing lovely hand-made instruments.   And I'm not a 'proper' recorder player at all, just an enthusiast.

 

:wub:


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#14 elemimele

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Posted 03 May 2021 - 17:33

of course the bonus is that you are also supporting a craftsman/woman who makes such things. Really it's a win for all concerned.


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#15 elemimele

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Posted 03 May 2021 - 18:07

Not a flute person at all, but if you are seriously contemplating open holes and you're not sure if it's right for you, one option would be to buy the open-hole version of the extraordinarily cheap Eastar flute, just as a try-it-out, almost "disposable" flute. They cost about £90, and have been reviewed quite favourably by Amelie Brodeur of The Flute Channel on YouTube. (this is the review of the closed-hole version)


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