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#sight #reading #sightreading

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#1 Ligneo Fistula

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Posted 22 February 2020 - 17:04

Could you sight-read this and make a very good stab at it?  https://www.youtube....h?v=w_-HlBa67Kg

 

Just wondering...


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#2 corenfa

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Posted 22 February 2020 - 18:19

No.


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#3 Tortellini

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Posted 22 February 2020 - 19:01

No!


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#4 fsharpminor

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Posted 22 February 2020 - 20:21

Hm I'd struggle a bit with that !   Errrrrrr, rather more than a bit !   :lol:


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#5 Ligneo Fistula

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Posted 22 February 2020 - 21:13

OK my apologies. 

 

I've been working extremely hard on sight-reading recently (to absolutely no avail sadly).  Somewhere deep in my subconscious I must have been taken the scene from Virtuoso in which John Ogdon (played by Alfred Molina) effortlessly sight-reads something like this piece after a dinner party and constructed an idea that this is the sort of thing most players can sight read at grade 8.

 

Slowly going crazy...


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#6 BadStrad

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Posted 22 February 2020 - 21:40

My OH is an extremely good sight reader. He said he could sight read it but not at the tempo of the YT clip (without more familiarity with the style) so the average, or even very good grade eight player wouldn't be sight reading that.

John Ogdon, as the film probably covered (must look for a copy) was famous for his ability to sight read *anything* particularly modern music.
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#7 mel2

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Posted 23 February 2020 - 00:05

I didn't get as far as the piece - just a load of other YouTube dross.

I'll try again later.
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#8 EllieD

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Posted 23 February 2020 - 08:41

I think you are maybe going a little mad with this LF. To know that John Ogdon could sight read such pieces and conclude a Grade 8 pianist would be able to do so as well is a bit illogical. John Ogdon's abilities were exceptional by any standard. Grade 8 is not even a dot on the level of ability John possessed.


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#9 Ligneo Fistula

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Posted 23 February 2020 - 09:38

I think you are maybe going a little mad with this LF. To know that John Ogdon could sight read such pieces and conclude a Grade 8 pianist would be able to do so as well is a bit illogical. John Ogdon's abilities were exceptional by any standard. Grade 8 is not even a dot on the level of ability John possessed.

Oh, I'm well gone, EllieD. :rofl:


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#10 Tenor Viol

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Posted 23 February 2020 - 11:06

The usual guideline as I understand it is roughly that sight-reading 'ability' is around 2 or 3 grades below 'learned' playing level. That indicates that if you are a good G8 player then you would probably sight-read well at G5/G6 level. Given that a concert soloist as a minimum is going to be masters degree in performance / Fellowship level, it's not a reasonable comparison. Exceptional performers are of course much more capable than that.  


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#11 elemimele

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Posted 23 February 2020 - 12:00

I'm a great believer in fit-for-purpose. I can't imagine that even amongst professional pianists working in environments where sight-reading is vital, there would be much call to perform things like that without any prior preparation. 

Sight reading is one of those things where although we'd all obviously love to be really, really good at it, it's already a jolly useful skill even at far lower levels. An early-years classroom teacher who can sight-read her way through simple songs at nativity-play time is a gem to be treasured. Maybe I'm in Enid Blyton world hoping that an uncle who can deal with basic accompaniments will always have some use in family gatherings?

Let's admire the real greats, but also value what we ourselves can do, be it big or small.

 

(Incidentally, I do struggle with that style of composition; I'm a bit boring when it comes to musical taste, and don't really enjoy the cat-chasing-on-keyboard school of composition)


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#12 Invidia

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Posted 23 February 2020 - 12:17

Yes, but not at tempo (like BadStrad's OH)
 
I used to want to be a composer so there was a period where I spent more time gathering new scores and sight-reading them for gist than I did polishing anything. Now I just play as a hobby and I'm in the annoying position of having to select repertoire that *isn't* sight-readable to force myself to learn it properly. This basically means a) contemporary stuff, or b) stuff well above my playing level   :headdesk:

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#13 bevpiano

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Posted 23 February 2020 - 12:54

Definitely not at tempo, it would have to be very much slower for me. I don't think many people could, quite honestly, it would need the phenomenal ability of someone like John Ogdon. I don't think concert soloists are generally the best sight-readers, by the way. I certainly know some who are not. That's not what their work requires, excellent memory is more useful. Someone who does a lot of accompanying or ensemble playing at a high level is more likely to be an expert sight reader.
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#14 LoneM

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Posted 23 February 2020 - 17:44

John Ogdon also had an outstanding memory.  Apparently as a student in Manchester he couldn't afford to buy piano music, so would browse through scores in the music shops, then go back to college and play them from memory. I heard this on a Radio 3 programme some years ago with some of his former fellow students  - I think it was Peter Maxwell Davies who described this.


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#15 maggiemay

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Posted 23 February 2020 - 18:01

Another ‘yes but under tempo’ here.


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