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#136 Latin pianist

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Posted 20 August 2019 - 19:29

I thought you left them on to protect next years buds from frost.
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#137 hummingbird

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Posted 20 August 2019 - 20:03

^ That's what I've always understood and I've always left them on. 

 

I've got to have my laburnum tree felled sad.png  It's been a wonderful tree and every inch used to be covered with flowers in the spring but now it's died.  Over the course of the last year or two, I've had to have all my trees taken out and once the laburnum is gone, my garden will look empty sad.png

 

On the plus side, I can start afresh with young trees and shrubs, and will have the pleasure of watching them grow instead of the dismalness of watching them die smile.png


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#138 Aquarelle

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Posted 21 August 2019 - 07:38

Thanks for the advice and link about hydrangeas. After looking at the various bits of advice I have decided not to dead head this year. My hydrangea bush is still very small  so a bit fragile. so I am going to leave the big dead flowers to protect the buds through the winter. I might change my mind next year if the bush looks stronger.

 

Has any one else had the same fast forwarding of the seasons? I am finding myself having to do  now some of the jobs I have always done at the end of October. The garden is beginning to look autumnal earlier and earlier.  


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#139 PatC

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Posted 28 August 2019 - 01:46

Box moth - plse see my post on Weather thread. In a flat in north London, not aware of local box plants but of course there will be some in nearby parks & gardens.
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#140 Maizie

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Posted 31 August 2019 - 15:00

This time last year, we planted some summer seed potatoes, to give you new potatoes in November/December.  We had two beds to put them in.  Both prodcued magnificently, one bed we managed to keep up with and havest all of and eat, the other we manage 50% of.  But we left the other 50%, thinking they might survive the winter and come back next year with a plant or two.  No further seed potatoes planted this spring.

Today we have just cleared both beds again - the one we previously 'harvested' being not so emptied as we imagined, and we've got about 10kg of spuds.  Not entirely sure how we're going to eat that many in good time!!


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#141 Hedgehog

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Posted 31 August 2019 - 15:58

Thanks for the advice and link about hydrangeas. After looking at the various bits of advice I have decided not to dead head this year. My hydrangea bush is still very small  so a bit fragile. so I am going to leave the big dead flowers to protect the buds through the winter. I might change my mind next year if the bush looks stronger.

 

Has any one else had the same fast forwarding of the seasons? I am finding myself having to do  now some of the jobs I have always done at the end of October. The garden is beginning to look autumnal earlier and earlier.  

My pink hydrangea is now in its autumnal phase. Flowers have lost all their colour - I think it might be because it suffered water shortage - it didn't look that droopy so I haven't watered it as much as usual. I will be leaving the dead heads on all the hydrangeas this year as always because it breaks the frost (if we get any)


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#142 hummingbird

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Posted 14 September 2019 - 19:59

I've got a crop of mushrooms/toadstools growing around some of the new plants that were planted this Spring.  I presume the spores must have been in the soil that came with the plants because I've never had fungi before.  With apologies to mycologist Hedgehog, but whilst I'm very appreciative of mushrooms/toadstools in wild environments, I'm afraid I don't want them in my garden!  I imagine their tentacles spread quite a long way underground so has anyone any ideas of how to get rid of them, without damaging my plants.


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#143 Misterioso

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Posted 15 September 2019 - 13:25

I've got a crop of mushrooms/toadstools growing around some of the new plants that were planted this Spring.  I presume the spores must have been in the soil that came with the plants because I've never had fungi before.  With apologies to mycologist Hedgehog, but whilst I'm very appreciative of mushrooms/toadstools in wild environments, I'm afraid I don't want them in my garden!  I imagine their tentacles spread quite a long way underground so has anyone any ideas of how to get rid of them, without damaging my plants.

 

Do they really spread a long way underground? I didn't realise that. We have a patch that comes up regularly every autumn, but this year a large clump of them has sprung up at the other end of the garden. We haven't planted anything new, so no idea where they came from.

 

On another theme, has anyone any good ideas for conservatory plants? We'd like something green and graceful, but haven't been able to put anything in it before because we had a roof that let in light and heat, and the temperatures soared much too high. Now we have a new, solid roof, so although there are windows all the way round, it might be doable if we could find something that didn't mind getting a bit too warm (and a bit too cold at night). Do such plants exist?


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#144 chris13

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Posted 15 September 2019 - 14:28

We have kept an umbrella tree (schefflera actinophylla) for the best part of 40 years. Would be best if it gets sunlight from more than one direction. Also the crown gradually gets higher and higher but I then take an air cutting and start it all over again. Very tolerant of inside temps and under or over watering.


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#145 Misterioso

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Posted 16 September 2019 - 10:51

We have kept an umbrella tree (schefflera actinophylla) for the best part of 40 years. Would be best if it gets sunlight from more than one direction. Also the crown gradually gets higher and higher but I then take an air cutting and start it all over again. Very tolerant of inside temps and under or over watering.

 

 

Thanks, Chris13, that's a brilliant suggestion! I am going to buy one if I can find one at our local garden centre. 


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#146 mel2

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Posted 17 September 2019 - 13:23

Just harvested the first (perfect, unblemished - there have been some undersized duds) cooking apple from our step-over variety Arthur Turner.
Weighed in at 12 and 3/4 oz.
Highly delighted.
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