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LRSM Piano pieces


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#1 pianodom

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Posted 04 October 2019 - 18:23

Hi

 

Could anyone advise if Liszt Vallee D'Obermann would be a suitable LRSM piece?  I really want to include it in my LRSM recital but not sure if it would be up to LRSM standard or not - I'm not sure it's technically that demanding.

 

Does difficult matter per piece, or is it the overall standard?

 

Thanks :)


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#2 Invidia

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Posted 07 October 2019 - 18:30

This piece is definitely LRSM standard. I'm not sure what makes you say it's not that technically demanding? It's probably "easier" than most of the Liszt on the syllabus, but definitely "difficult" enough!

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#3 pianodom

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Posted 07 October 2019 - 22:25

 

This piece is definitely LRSM standard. I'm not sure what makes you say it's not that technically demanding? It's probably "easier" than most of the Liszt on the syllabus, but definitely "difficult" enough!

 

 

Hi Invidia, thanks for responding.  Oh I'm glad to hear that!  I was thinking it's not demanding enough after playing through the other Liszt pieces actually on the syllabus - most of which end up with me asking how on earth i'm supposed to play that?  I (badly) learnt Vallee D'Obermann when I was young and as long as you're OK with octaves I find technically it sits under the fingers quite easily.  But it's such a beautiful piece I thought this would be a good opportunity to learn it properly.  I've started learning La Campanella as well, because I've always thought it un-playable but such an awesome piece  :D

 

These are two programmes I've put together:

Bach Chromatic Fantasie and Fugue

Chopin Ballade No. 1

Liszt La Campanella

Scriabin Etude Op 8 No 12

Rachmaninov Prelude Op 32 No 10

Ravel Jeux D’eaux

Total: 40m

 

 

Bach WTC - No.4 C# minor .849

Liszt Vallee D’Obermann

Liszt La Campanella

Rachmaninov Prelude Op 32 No 10

Rachmaninov Moments Musicaux Op 16 No 4

Ravel Jeux D’eau

Total: 41m

 

 

Couple of questions:

 - Is it OK to be so Romantic-era focused?  I've added what I think are a demanding Bach piece as balance.

 - Is it OK to have so many pieces, or is it better to play fewer bigger ones?  It will make the programme notes quite short for each piece?

 - Is it a bad idea to play such a 'greatest hits' programme like the first programme?  Are the examiners going to either be fed up with them, or be so familiar with recordings from the masters that it will be difficult to score well?

 

I could maybe do a programme of fewer but bigger pieces:

Bach Chromatic Fantasie and Fugue

Chopin Ballade No. 1

Liszt Vallee D’Obermann

Liszt La Campanella (or Ravel Jeux D'eau)

Total: 40m


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#4 Invidia

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Posted 08 October 2019 - 09:32

 Is it OK to be so Romantic-era focused?  I've added what I think are a demanding Bach piece as balance.

 

The LRSM syllabus requests two distinct musical eras. So Baroque and Romantic are fine.
 
 
 Is it OK to have so many pieces, or is it better to play fewer bigger ones?  It will make the programme notes quite short for each piece?
 
I don't remember the specific requirements about pieces/programme notes, but if you feel the number of pieces may compromise the quality of the programme notes it's probably best to cut?
 
 Is it a bad idea to play such a 'greatest hits' programme like the first programme?  Are the examiners going to either be fed up with them, or be so familiar with recordings from the masters that it will be difficult to score well?
 
Personally I like your third programme, with Ravel's Jeux d'eau instead of La Campanella. But I think Bach-Chopin-Liszt is very heavy going on your listener. The Chopin Ballade is the most risky in terms of examiners getting fed up, so I'd be inclined to replace it with a set of some sort (a suite, some variations, maybe a pair of your Scriabin Etudes or Rachmaninov Preludes instead of just the one) to give more balance.

 


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#5 Clovis

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Posted 08 October 2019 - 09:46

I played seven pieces in my LRSM, all of equal weight, and treated the whole programme as a kind of suite (Bach and Rameau at either end, with 20th-C music as the middle five pieces).

 

The notes had similar word-counts for each piece, and yes, each work received less attention than if I'd done only three pieces, but it wasn't a problem for the exam.

 

The examiners are interested in your reasons for programming what you play and if you have a good enough argument, then you'll be fine. If you do opt for more pieces, then I think you have to pay more attention to pacing and variety of mood.


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#6 pianodom

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Posted 09 October 2019 - 13:54

Thanks for the input :)  Think I'm going to learn these to start with:

 

Bach: Chromatic Fantasy+Fugue

Liszt: La Campanella

Liszt: Vallee D'Obermann

Rach: Prelude Op32 No 10

Ravel Jeux D'Eau

 

Think you may be right Invidia about examiner fatigue over hearing the Ballade No.1 - and it's fiendishly difficult.  I've just started reading a book 'Play it Again' that is a story about an amateur pianist tackling this piece!  But the Ballade's are so beautiful I think it's an itch that will be difficult not to scratch.

 

Would be really interesting if others who have taken LRSM would post their programmes here.


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#7 Clovis

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Posted 09 October 2019 - 14:03


 

Would be really interesting if others who have taken LRSM would post their programmes here.

Bach WTC 2, P&F in C sharp major

Webern, Variations

Messiaen, Regard des Prophètes, des Bergers et des Mages

Ligeti, Etude 'Arc-en-ciel' (Bk 1)

Boulez, Notations (selection)

Debussy, Homage à Rameau

Rameau, Gavotte and doubles, from Suite in A

 

Taken December 2018


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#8 pianodom

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Posted 09 October 2019 - 15:47

Wow that's a really unusual programme!  Did you do it from memory?  Congrats on getting a distinction!


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#9 EllieD

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Posted 10 October 2019 - 07:51

T

 

Think you may be right Invidia about examiner fatigue over hearing the Ballade No.1 - and it's fiendishly difficult.  I've just started reading a book 'Play it Again' that is a story about an amateur pianist tackling this piece!  But the Ballade's are so beautiful I think it's an itch that will be difficult not to scratch.

 

 

 

Hopefully you can learn it anyway, even if you don't play it for your diploma. How long would you expect it to take to learn all those pieces that you will play? And will you be performing them all from memory too? I am very impressed with everyone going for diplomas!!  :)


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#10 Clovis

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Posted 10 October 2019 - 08:18

Wow that's a really unusual programme!  Did you do it from memory?  Congrats on getting a distinction!

Thank you!

No, not from memory. If the notes in the Webern and Ligeti didn't get me, then the rhythms in Messiaen and Boulez certainly would have done.

My memory is rubbish under pressure anyway, even for music with tunes.

 

The unconventional programming certainly made for an interesting viva. The questions for the 20th-century pieces were mostly based on what I'd written in the notes, so I didn't get anything I couldn't answer easily.

 

It took me four years since the dipABRSM to put it together and I learnt a whole load of pieces that didn't make it into the final programme (this emerged only six months before the exam), so don't feel you have to decide on your recital right now.

 

EllieD is right – learn your Ballade anyway – the process will help your playing and may inspire you to go off in a completely different direction. That's what happened when I discovered Webern. I was normal until then.


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#11 fsharpminor

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Posted 10 October 2019 - 09:57

I considered doing LRSM when I retired 7 years ago, but didnt see the point as I dont teach and perform only occasionally. In any case my A Dip was ALCM (1963!) and they would probably have made me do DipABRSM first. I had learned Bach WTC Book 2 No 14 (My favourite of them all), was nearly there with Beethoven Op 31 No 2 and Chopin Ballade 3.


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#12 Invidia

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Posted 10 October 2019 - 11:31

Also agree that you should go ahead and learn the Ballade. It doesn't have to be for the exam!
 
I'm also learning a bunch of pieces and hoping that eventually a solid programme will emerge. I'm pretty sure that I want one of Messiaen's Catalogue d'oiseaux as my central work (either nr.4 or nr.13) but I'm in no rush to settle on the others- I'm sure they'll come in time!

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#13 corenfa

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Posted 10 October 2019 - 12:20

I also want to learn that Ballade but it's because I read that same book about learning to play it and got really annoyed!

I've thought about doing an LRSM eventually if I pass my LTCL, because I am interested in the accompanist option.
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#14 pianodom

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Posted 12 October 2019 - 10:44

 


Hopefully you can learn it anyway, even if you don't play it for your diploma. How long would you expect it to take to learn all those pieces that you will play? And will you be performing them all from memory too? I am very impressed with everyone going for diplomas!!  :)

 

Yes I think you're right, i'll definitely learn it anyway in between doing the other pieces - it feels like a right of passage!  Definitely won't be doing them all from memory - I have a rubbish memory and have never performed anything from memory before - but it's my aim this time to do at least one or two of the pieces from memory.  I think some pieces like La Campanella and Vallee D'obermann which is very tuneful would be easier to memorise and benefit from it.  Anything Bach, no way!


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#15 fsharpminor

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Posted 12 October 2019 - 11:06

The book about learning Ballade 1 is by Alan Rusbridger, he was editor of the Guardian at the time.. I find Ballade 3 a little easier to manage though.  https://www.amazon.c...,aps,202&sr=1-2


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