Jump to content


Photo

Being a teacher and a student

teacher student relationship brass piano

  • Please log in to reply
18 replies to this topic

#16 Wai Kit Leung

Wai Kit Leung

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 547 posts
  • Member: 160
    Joined: 20-November 03

Posted 20 November 2014 - 07:32

had the opposite problem. I had already passed my FRSM on oboe (and Advanced Cert on bassoon) when I started taking saxophone lessons. Although I told my teacher repeatedly I played concertos on oboe, he kept using the same teaching material (and the same pace) as he would with total beginners. Perhaps he didn't understand what concertos meant (there weren't that many for saxophone, and he was mostly a jazz player).
  • 0

#17 ten left thumbs

ten left thumbs

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 830 posts
  • Member: 454622
    Joined: 09-May 12

Posted 20 November 2014 - 09:05

had the opposite problem. I had already passed my FRSM on oboe (and Advanced Cert on bassoon) when I started taking saxophone lessons. Although I told my teacher repeatedly I played concertos on oboe, he kept using the same teaching material (and the same pace) as he would with total beginners. Perhaps he didn't understand what concertos meant (there weren't that many for saxophone, and he was mostly a jazz player).

 

Priceless! :)

 

Rose - I think it goes with the territory that I accept I won't sound good immediately. Certainly it would have to for string instrument -squeek! I also think probably my ear is hyper-sensitive and I need to just blast on, like I did when I was 10. So I do accept what the teacher is saying for this. However, I keep coming back to, that he'll ask me to play tunes I haven't got a snowball's chance in ###### of getting through, then asked me to look up the gr 6&7 syllabus and make a start on that, and I do wonder sometimes what planet he's on.

 

There is pushing yourself physically. There is having the guts to go for something confidently even if you think you probably won't make it. But, honestly, this stuff, I have as much chance of sprouting wings on demand and flying up to the ceiling, as making the notes. 


  • 0

#18 Latin pianist

Latin pianist

    Virtuoso

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3753 posts
  • Member: 711500
    Joined: 01-April 13
  • Cotswolds

Posted 20 November 2014 - 09:18

Do you think you'd be better to try another teacher? After all, enjoyment is a big factor in lessons for adults, especially when it's a second instrument. This teacher seems to be causing you frustration.
  • 1

#19 ten left thumbs

ten left thumbs

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 830 posts
  • Member: 454622
    Joined: 09-May 12

Posted 20 November 2014 - 16:11


 


From own experience with students: I've inherited a couple over the years who have been given material far too difficult for their stage of vocal development by their former teachers, it's sadly not that uncommon. This included 16 year olds straining through arias that are even challenging for experienced pros. It's not pleasant to listen to, and it does the student a real disservice in more than one way.
 

 I've seen this too. An absolute beginner (adult) at piano who in 3 lessons with another teacher had been given photocopies of  AB  grade 1 pieces. Had all the names of the notes pencilled in. The student didn't even know her finger numbers or the names of white notes on the piano. Quite literally she didn't know which way was up.

 

So, I don't completely trust this teacher, I don't not trust him either. We're arranging this lesson-by-lesson, so I'll have another lesson with him, chat (or not, depends how open he is) and then either continue or stop and go it alone for a while. 


  • 0





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: teacher student relationship, brass, piano