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#466 Zixi

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Posted 14 September 2021 - 08:39

We now have a designated area of outstanding ugly in our 'garden'. The insects love it as we've also allowed the nettles to colonise there.


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#467 Edwardo

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Posted 23 September 2021 - 09:23

My garden has a tall wooden fence (about three metres, I would estimate) which is covered by ivy.  On the plus side, ivy is green and (mostly) evergreen.  On the minus side, it's very vigorous, needs cutting back annually and I've had enough of it.  The whole growth comes from two fairly substantial trunks/stems, and someone suggested that I could cut these through (to make a gap) which would kill the plant, but would retain the structure (a lot of dead branches) which would make a very good frame for a lovely climber like clematis etc.

 

I am the least green-fingered of gardeners, but this idea appeals (yes, I know I'll have to collect all the dead leaves when they fall off).  Can anyone see a downside?  I don't want to remove it because a) I think it's keeping the fence up! and b) birds nest in it.

 

I have now sawn through the trunks for the ivy (well, I did it a couple of weeks ago) and there has been no difference - the ivy seems to be thriving just as before.  The trunks were pretty substantial (between 2-4 inches in diameter) and I've removed pieces to leave gaps at least an inch wide.  Somewhat confused ... is there any other way to kill this awful weed?  I have some SDK brushkiller which I've painted on the stumps at the gaps ...


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#468 maggiemay

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Posted 23 September 2021 - 09:30

 

My garden has a tall wooden fence (about three metres, I would estimate) which is covered by ivy.  On the plus side, ivy is green and (mostly) evergreen.  On the minus side, it's very vigorous, needs cutting back annually and I've had enough of it.  The whole growth comes from two fairly substantial trunks/stems, and someone suggested that I could cut these through (to make a gap) which would kill the plant, but would retain the structure (a lot of dead branches) which would make a very good frame for a lovely climber like clematis etc.

 

I am the least green-fingered of gardeners, but this idea appeals (yes, I know I'll have to collect all the dead leaves when they fall off).  Can anyone see a downside?  I don't want to remove it because a) I think it's keeping the fence up! and b) birds nest in it.

 

I have now sawn through the trunks for the ivy (well, I did it a couple of weeks ago) and there has been no difference - the ivy seems to be thriving just as before.  The trunks were pretty substantial (between 2-4 inches in diameter) and I've removed pieces to leave gaps at least an inch wide.  Somewhat confused ... is there any other way to kill this awful weed?  I have some SDK brushkiller which I've painted on the stumps at the gaps ...

 

My OH would sympathise with you - he hates the stuff and wages a constant battle with it. I’m more laid back about it - don’t mind it on fences so much but try to keep it off the actual garden - to some extent at least. I fight a war with the tap-rooted nasties, and brambles. 

I think you may find that the ivy will gradually die off, but it will take a while. I have removed it from trees from time to time, and the stuff you can’t reach (I suspect) gets a certain amount of sustenance from the host plant, but even that eventually seems to give up. I doubt it would gain much from a wooden fence  - maybe a ittle moisture - so fingers crossed for you. 


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#469 Misterioso

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Posted 23 September 2021 - 09:41

We have a strange kind of weed in our flower bed - it breaks off quite easily, and has roots that seem to extend forever. We once went through it and removed every piece we could find and dug them right back to where they began - but now it's back. Do we have to live with this, or are there solutions? And are there plants you can use for ground cover to avoid other less desirable stuff taking root?

 

And another topic entirely - what can I use to give the bed colour in the winter months, when it usually takes upon itself the aspect of a "forgotten wilderness"?


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#470 Edwardo

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Posted 23 September 2021 - 10:24

 

 

My garden has a tall wooden fence (about three metres, I would estimate) which is covered by ivy.  On the plus side, ivy is green and (mostly) evergreen.  On the minus side, it's very vigorous, needs cutting back annually and I've had enough of it.  The whole growth comes from two fairly substantial trunks/stems, and someone suggested that I could cut these through (to make a gap) which would kill the plant, but would retain the structure (a lot of dead branches) which would make a very good frame for a lovely climber like clematis etc.

 

I am the least green-fingered of gardeners, but this idea appeals (yes, I know I'll have to collect all the dead leaves when they fall off).  Can anyone see a downside?  I don't want to remove it because a) I think it's keeping the fence up! and b) birds nest in it.

 

I have now sawn through the trunks for the ivy (well, I did it a couple of weeks ago) and there has been no difference - the ivy seems to be thriving just as before.  The trunks were pretty substantial (between 2-4 inches in diameter) and I've removed pieces to leave gaps at least an inch wide.  Somewhat confused ... is there any other way to kill this awful weed?  I have some SDK brushkiller which I've painted on the stumps at the gaps ...

 

My OH would sympathise with you - he hates the stuff and wages a constant battle with it. I’m more laid back about it - don’t mind it on fences so much but try to keep it off the actual garden - to some extent at least. I fight a war with the tap-rooted nasties, and brambles. 

I think you may find that the ivy will gradually die off, but it will take a while. I have removed it from trees from time to time, and the stuff you can’t reach (I suspect) gets a certain amount of sustenance from the host plant, but even that eventually seems to give up. I doubt it would gain much from a wooden fence  - maybe a ittle moisture - so fingers crossed for you. 

 

 

Thanks Maggie ... I'm probably a bit impatient (wouldn't be the first time!)


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#471 Aquarelle

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Posted 23 September 2021 - 12:54

Maggie is right about ivy taking a long time to die off. I also am still battling.


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#472 Zixi

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Posted 14 October 2021 - 10:04

Has anyone got suggestions for interesting house plants? I used to have a large cactus collection but when we moved here we lost the conservatory and there was no where for the collection (which now consists of just a few plants). I'm not keen to continue with them in any case because of The Collie. She's very respectful of property but I'd still rather not take the risk. Some of mine were vicious! I've got African Violets (and near relatives), Christmas/Easter cactus, Cape Primrose, spider plants, lithops, orchids etc etc and a lime tree (very small). But given we have very little outside by way of flowers, it'd be nice to have some more plants inside. I've never been much of a houseplant person beyond the things I've mentioned so I'm struggling to work out what might be nice to have. Ideas anyone?


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#473 Norway

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Posted 14 October 2021 - 10:15

I'd get a fake one - permanently in flower, no watering required, no bits dropping everywhere. :)


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#474 Misterioso

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Posted 14 October 2021 - 10:21

What about a baby ornamental fig tree? Ours is now around four feet high, but that's after 20 years.

Or asparagus fern? - so pretty, and easy to grow.


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#475 Zixi

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Posted 14 October 2021 - 14:15

@ Misteriosa - Thanks! Those sound interesting. I like fern-like plants; I've never tried ornamental figs though we do have a very very small fig tree outside.

 

@Norway - I do have some very ancient paper tulips which are wonderful. Every so often I think about throwing them because they really are faded and a bit tatty but I can't find anything nearly as nice.


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#476 Misterioso

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Posted 15 October 2021 - 10:12

@ Misteriosa - Thanks! Those sound interesting. I like fern-like plants; I've never tried ornamental figs though we do have a very very small fig tree outside.

 

@Norway - I do have some very ancient paper tulips which are wonderful. Every so often I think about throwing them because they really are faded and a bit tatty but I can't find anything nearly as nice.

Lakeland do some nice artificial flowers.


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#477 Zixi

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Posted 17 October 2021 - 10:02

I think I'm going to try real to start with. I thought I might trying growing some things from seed... :blink:


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#478 dorfmouse

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Posted 17 October 2021 - 12:48

I've given up growing things from seed. My usual pattern is to nurse them into growth conscientiously, and then forget them for a few days at a crucial stage.
Somehow I've also recently managed to exterminate two Tradescantias which are supposed to be just about immortal ...
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#479 maggiemay

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Posted 17 October 2021 - 13:11

During last year’s lockdown, I grew stuff from seed that I’d never attempted before. Much of it was semi-experimental, in that I saved seeds from a supermarket pepper, as well as planting anything I thought might just grow (onion tops? sprouting garlic), and using a motley collection of washed yogurt pots, and veggie trays. 

 

I was hugely encouraged by the (largely unexpected ) success. We enjoyed a summer of fresh basil, lettuces, coriander, and other things. Even a couple of small peppers, although they’d have done better planted earlier in the season. The one crop that totally failed - and I mean totally - not even one seedling!! was a pack of commercially produced chives. The basil did supremely well, and I gave several pots away. 

 

Not suggesting you follow my example  (it’s the wrong season for some of this stuff, and anyway you wanted flowers),  but do give seeds a try if you even half fancy it. 

 

By the way - anyone who likes pea-shoots, you do know you can grow your own crop from a packet of dried peas in about 10 days, right  ? 


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#480 Hedgehog

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Posted 17 October 2021 - 15:45

 

By the way - anyone who likes pea-shoots, you do know you can grow your own crop from a packet of dried peas in about 10 days, right  ? 

Any particular brand that works best?

And I second the growing crops from seed. My runner beans were more or less a failure, but I have some left so might have another go in a different way next year. Delicious success with my carrots though.  I planted 2 complete rows, and 2 half rows have grown. I don't know what happened to the other seeds - must have turned up their toes and gone the wrong way.  Definitely growing more carrots next year.


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