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Cryptic crosswords


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#1081 Aeolienne

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Posted 28 July 2021 - 22:09


Our neighbour's four-wheel drive reversing over two points (5)

_ _N_ _

 

What about the four wheel drive clue? Do you have anymore letters for that?

VENUS fitted, although I'm not 100% sure of the derivation.


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#1082 Latin pianist

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Posted 29 July 2021 - 01:47

SUV written backwards around E and N. Is Venus a neighbouring planet?
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#1083 maggiemay

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Posted 29 July 2021 - 06:39

SUV written backwards around E and N. Is Venus a neighbouring planet?

It depends when you ask, I think ! 


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#1084 Aeolienne

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Posted 29 July 2021 - 21:42

I'm stuck on just one clue in a puzzle in the Stratford-upon-Avon Herald...

 

What a drop in the ocean will produce (6)

S_L_S_


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#1085 Latin pianist

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Posted 30 July 2021 - 03:23

Could it be splash?
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#1086 Aeolienne

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Posted 30 July 2021 - 19:06

It fits, although surely a drop of water wouldn't cause much of a splash on the ocean's surface? :unsure:

 

Let's try one from The Times...

 

Grave sin - eliminating men in hostile circumstances (6)

_ _P_T_

 

How Enright is made to do things differently? (4,3,7)

_ _ _ _/_ _ _/_ _ _ _M_S

 

Judge a very good Köchel number for composer (7)

_ _ _N_E_

 

Flier uncovered book of navigational routes (7)

_ _ _ _L_ _

 

A certain something penned by excellent poet (7)

_ _ _ _E_ _


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#1087 Latin pianist

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Posted 30 July 2021 - 19:12

I think it’s a double meaning clue as a drop in the ocean means something that makes virtually no difference as well as literally a drop falling into the ocean.


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#1088 Latin pianist

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Posted 31 July 2021 - 06:19

I think the judge one is Janacek. J for judge an ace for very good and K for Kochel number. Could the n be incorrect?


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#1089 stetenorve

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Posted 31 July 2021 - 08:16

How Enright is made to do things differently? (4,3,7)

_ _ _ _/_ _ _/_ _ _ _M_S

 

Could be Ring the changes.

Anagram of enright plus changes. Although that questions the M above. 


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#1090 AdLibitum

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Posted 31 July 2021 - 09:02

How do you folks do all this? Is there done sort of secret club where you learn how clues are constructed? I look at 99.9% of them and think What???
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#1091 Latin pianist

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Posted 31 July 2021 - 09:08

I think it helps if you’re brought up to do them. But there are sites which explain the different sorts of clues and how you recognise them. Eg an anagram might be indicated by the word disorganised or mixed up or many other words. Or there are answers hidden in the clue indicated by eg found in, or containing. Try Big Dave’s Little Guide to Cryptic Crosswords.


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#1092 Gordon Shumway

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Posted 31 July 2021 - 11:26

How do you folks do all this? Is there done sort of secret club where you learn how clues are constructed? I look at 99.9% of them and think What???

A few years back it was more common to buy a newspaper than read the news on the internet, so you just attempted the crossword one day and read the answers the next day and tried to work out what was going on. Find a work colleague who was good and get occasional explanations from them. Most papers are horrible though, so it's harder nowadays. And good compilers used to be witty, which was part of the attraction. The most famous was Araucaria, but he died a few years ago.


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#1093 Crock

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Posted 31 July 2021 - 13:26

 

How do you folks do all this? Is there done sort of secret club where you learn how clues are constructed? I look at 99.9% of them and think What???

A few years back it was more common to buy a newspaper than read the news on the internet, so you just attempted the crossword one day and read the answers the next day and tried to work out what was going on. Find a work colleague who was good and get occasional explanations from them. Most papers are horrible though, so it's harder nowadays. And good compilers used to be witty, which was part of the attraction. The most famous was Araucaria, but he died a few years ago.

 

Indeed, my father did the crossword every day for example.  I never did and just didn't get it. Then in my dad's final (his only ever) illness we did the crossword every day for 7 weeks and yes you get used to it.  He sent in the Scotsman weekend prize crossword every week for 30 years but had never won anything.  The week before he died we did the crossword together and I sent it in for him... and he discovered on the morning of the day he died that at long last he had finally won the prize.  I've never done a crossword since.    


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#1094 Latin pianist

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Posted 31 July 2021 - 14:26

My father used to put in all the letters that we couldn’t get from other clues for us until we got that we could do them. He had dementia for years but could still do cryptic crosswords till not long before he died.


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#1095 AdLibitum

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Posted 31 July 2021 - 15:35



How do you folks do all this? Is there done sort of secret club where you learn how clues are constructed? I look at 99.9% of them and think What???

A few years back it was more common to buy a newspaper than read the news on the internet, so you just attempted the crossword one day and read the answers the next day and tried to work out what was going on. Find a work colleague who was good and get occasional explanations from them. Most papers are horrible though, so it's harder nowadays. And good compilers used to be witty, which was part of the attraction. The most famous was Araucaria, but he died a few years ago.
Indeed, my father did the crossword every day for example. I never did and just didn't get it. Then in my dad's final (his only ever) illness we did the crossword every day for 7 weeks and yes you get used to it. He sent in the Scotsman weekend prize crossword every week for 30 years but had never won anything. The week before he died we did the crossword together and I sent it in for him... and he discovered on the morning of the day he died that at long last he had finally won the prize. I've never done a crossword since.
I think I must have a speck of dust in my eye...
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