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Junior Conservatoire fees


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#1 Olivia

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Posted 30 April 2020 - 10:15

Our daughter has just been offered a place at junior conservatoire. It’s great news but taking on a new financial commitment on this scale is concerning us in these hugely uncertain times.

I’ve looked through all the lists of funding available and can’t seem to find anything relevant. We could apply for a bursary from the organisation but I’m thinking demand will be high.

Has anyone else had any experience that they are able to share.

Thanks in advance.
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#2 Banjogirl

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Posted 30 April 2020 - 11:12

Congratulations to your daughter. My son was at junior RNCM. He received a bursary for about a quarter of the fees each year. Bursaries were awarded to the, I think, six poorest families who applied. Only income was taken into account, and the form was pretty easy to fill in. We are not by any means poor. The nature of the juniors is that children who have got to the required standard are unlikely to come from poor homes. So you've a fair chance of getting an award if you're from an average income household. In his last two years he got a different bursary from some money the college had got from a charity. It was a little bit more, and the head said it would look good on his CV!

It's worth bearing in mind travel costs, depending on where you live, and other things like buying lunch or, ahem, going shopping when you're bored sitting around all day!

We took the view that it was for a limited time, and we would have been paying for lessons and so on anyway, but it is undoubtedly a big commitment.
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#3 Minstrel

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Posted 01 May 2020 - 16:24

Congratulations to your daughter, I hope she has a lot of fun and great music as well as all the good opportunities she hopes for.
My daughter too was at Junior Consevatoire , at the time there was a sliding scale of how much I had to pay and how much was covered by the government Music and Dance scheme . I wonder if this is still available, it was a big help . We also had a small amount of county scholarship funding which my daugter’s previous teacher nominated her for. This was a little while ago ( she left five years ago when she went to university ) , the Consevatoire provided a fairly long - but not stupidly so - form covering details including my income and circumstances which was approved quite quickly and which I had to reapply for each year.
I don’t know if this still exists, please do ask your conservatoire what help with fees is available, ours was very helpful.

Junior Conservtoire was a huge commitment for us not just in terms of fees but also travel - both time and cost - and also lots of performance and concerts as well as extra masterclasses. I was initially daunted by the commitment but it was worth every penny, every minute and every ounce of effort to make it happen. Our only regret was not applying when she was younger, she had been reluctant to leave her close knit music life so I only finally managed to nudge her into it in her teens.

Wishing you and your daughter all the very best .
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#4 Banjogirl

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Posted 01 May 2020 - 16:36

Our local authority was very clear that they don't provide any assistance!
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#5 elemimele

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Posted 02 May 2020 - 18:05

This statement is almost certainly very, very true:

 

 

The nature of the juniors is that children who have got to the required standard are unlikely to come from poor homes.

 

But it's toe-curlingly embarrassing, and a crashing damnation of how our educational system handles music-teaching, and doesn't say much for socialist ideals.


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#6 Banjogirl

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Posted 02 May 2020 - 19:38

This statement is almost certainly very, very true:


The nature of the juniors is that children who have got to the required standard are unlikely to come from poor homes.


But it's toe-curlingly embarrassing, and a crashing damnation of how our educational system handles music-teaching, and doesn't say much for socialist ideals.

It is.
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#7 elemimele

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Posted 02 May 2020 - 22:45

(and I didn't mean any offence... it'd just be lovely to see more opportunities, more use of all-round musicality, in all normal schools, rather than the current token term of ukulele - no doubt often delivered by someone who cares very much about what they're doing, but with no follow-up and little hope of any lasting benefit)


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#8 Banjogirl

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Posted 03 May 2020 - 11:45

(and I didn't mean any offence... it'd just be lovely to see more opportunities, more use of all-round musicality, in all normal schools, rather than the current token term of ukulele - no doubt often delivered by someone who cares very much about what they're doing, but with no follow-up and little hope of any lasting benefit)


This is so true. Our local primary started doing 'lessons' for every child, which consisted of one year of whole class tuition, with the children playing a variety of instruments. The cost must have been quite high but the children learnt almost nothing, and had little incentive to carry on afterwards. It was well meant but a complete waste of time. Whereas a neighbouring authority had a much more organised scheme, with all the children learning the violin. Progress was pretty slow, but they all held their instruments correctly and played very simple tunes together after a relatively short time. It was a much more satisfying and productive scheme, and lots moved on to proper school lessons.
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