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Essential Teaching Room Items


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#31 Aquarelle

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Posted 22 November 2019 - 10:20

Good quality digital piano.

Second piano (mine is a stage piano, easily moveable)

CD player

Small table beside piano for, music, note books, etc. Under this table is a cushion for the dog - which she thinks is the most important item! Two chairs.

 

Large cupboard for music in which I have  folders of graded music and some individual folders of music for certain pupils, theory  and aural books, CDs  pencils, pens, felt tips, patafix, sellotape, paper clips etc. etc, music stands and  tools for mending music stands  etc,  my recorders,  scissors, small guillotine (for paper not heads!) four hole perforator, scrap paper, glue and books, puzzles, games etc for waiting  siblings. Post its, visual aids,  electrical stuff – extension leads etc. small first aid kit;   – honestly I have almost everything you could need in any kind of emergency in this cupboard – including tin of coffee, tin of biscuits, cleaning materials and stock of plates and cups for tea parties! I general tidy it all once a term!

 

Second small table by the door on which I put the register for every pupil to sign in and disinfectant gel for hands and tissues. Waste paper baskets.

 

I have a couple more small tables and a trolley on wheels for anything in current use and any admin I might need that day.

 

My room is quite tiny and is in a school and next to the nursery class so it also contains a pile of little camp beds for the youngest  children to have their afternoon snooze. I use this pile to dump my bag and coat. The pupils hang up coats in the corridor. They have access to the school toilets.

 

In the corridor I have another cupboard in which I keep my class teaching stuff, bits and pieces for the yearly Christmas Celebration, a spare synthesizer and the materials I use for teaching English and a few percussion instruments.

 

I have a reputation at school for having (almost) anything needed and have often been asked for screw drivers, measuring tapes,  a hammer and various tools for tightening or loosening nuts and bolts. I sometimes think my room is a cross between a studio  ( :D)   and an iron monger’s.

 

At home I have a study which doubles up -  computer, admin stuff and - of course - more music, a rather old digital piano  and two cusions for the dog!


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#32 HelenVJ

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Posted 22 November 2019 - 11:16

Nothing pretentious about the word 'studio', which has many shades of meaning. Clearly we're not thinking Elstree, Pinewood or Abbey Road. As well as the actual physical space, I also use it to encompass my group of students and Piano Parents, as in 'I run a non-competitive studio' (whatever that means :lol:).

I'm lucky enough to have a designated teaching space, large enough for the young ones to play movement-based games and to use for informal Piano Parties - up to 10 performers and their families - so plenty of large floor cushions and a sofa. My most essential item is a variety of coasters for my tea or coffee, strategically placed around the studio. And also an ancient CD player, which amuses the younger kids, but is invaluable for the MFPA books.


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#33 jenny

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Posted 22 November 2019 - 12:14

 

I thought it wouldn't be long before the pretentious word 'studio' appeared in this thread.

 

This may be a difference in usage between American and British English.  Here in the States, "studio" is just the term we use for a space set aside for musical or artistic purposes.  No pretension intended.

 

 

Yes, I think there are differences between American and English expressions. When I was living abroad some years ago, I had several American pupils and was a bit taken aback when a parent asked me when the first recital would be. She just meant my next pupils concert.   


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#34 Bantock

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Posted 22 November 2019 - 13:53

Hilariously the teachers who seek to justify/defend their use of, or sympathy with, the term 'studio' only make themselves sound more pretentious in the process.
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#35 hummingbird

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Posted 22 November 2019 - 14:17

Hilariously the teachers who seek to justify/defend their use of, or sympathy with, the term 'studio' only make themselves sound more pretentious in the process.

I'm a student and it's never occurred to me that there was anything pretentious about the term 'music studio'.  I think it's more a case of 'reverse snobbery' on your part, Bantock!

 

I agree with a large clock in case I forget to wear my watch, so that if there's anything else I want to ask at the end, I know when the end is coming.


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#36 BabyGrand

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Posted 22 November 2019 - 15:06

Hilariously the teachers who seek to justify/defend their use of, or sympathy with, the term 'studio' only make themselves sound more pretentious in the process.

 

Bantock, why do you: (a) care so much which word someone else chooses to use to describe something?  (I may say couch, you may say sofa, someone else may say settee - as long as we all have somewhere to sit, does it really make any difference?)  And (b) feel a need to post on this thread, not to add anything helpful or even relevant, but purely to criticise and insult other posters?  

 

As the saying goes, if you don't have anything nice to say....  

 

I have been reluctant to post this and "feed the troll", but I care about protecting the atmosphere we have on this forum, of supporting rather than laughing at or being unkind to one another.  There's no place for that here.  (Or, in fact, anywhere.)  


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#37 corenfa

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Posted 22 November 2019 - 15:16

My teacher uses the term "studio" to describe her teaching practice. She uses the term "living room" to describe the room in which she teaches. Her actions show me that she is not pretentious; if anyone wishes to judge her as such I think she would be mystified.

Her essentials appear to be a lot of pencils, an extra chair and a good standing lamp with a movable arm. At least these are the items which I have used in every lesson over the last 9 years.
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#38 ma non troppo

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Posted 22 November 2019 - 19:09

I was under the impression that this forum was for teachers to discuss issues to do with teaching and to support one another.

In the past month I have been labelled as "vile" and "pretentious" .

It would be nice if there was more moderation here so that the forum rules could be enforced (see top of screen).

Yes, this post is off topic. Apologies.

To return to the original subject, yes, if you teach theory then a table or desk where you can sit alongside a student is a must, and a white board is useful if you have space. I also fall into the camp of not having a visible clock - I find it distracts students.
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#39 maggiemay

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Posted 22 November 2019 - 19:44

I agree a clock can be distracting.

I use an i-pad when teaching, and it shows the time, at the top of the screen, just visible to me, but unlikely to be to anyone else.  

I find that ideal. 


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#40 Banjogirl

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Posted 22 November 2019 - 19:59

No one has mentioned a (large-ish) clock - but maybe that shows that I'm not a teacher. :lol:

A largish clock is one of my teaching room essentials. One positioned where I can easily see it so that I can easily keep track of lesson times. I actually like my pupils to be able to see it too, so they have some sense of when time is running out, and they can make sure they allow plenty of time if they have any complex questions which need answering.

Ideally a ticking one to annoy the bejesus out of any irritating pupils you might have. IOr house is full of clocks. It used to drive the Boy nuts!
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#41 ma non troppo

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Posted 22 November 2019 - 20:42

I think that children would possibly switch off a bit if they knew we were 2 minutes away from the end of the lesson - and adults may feel pressured, especially if we are trying to "get something right" . I do feel it is my job to keep track of time, not theirs.
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#42 RPassacaglia

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Posted 22 November 2019 - 21:16

I agree a clock can be distracting.
I use an i-pad when teaching, and it shows the time, at the top of the screen, just visible to me, but unlikely to be to anyone else.  
I find that ideal.


That’s a good idea. May I ask what you use your iPad for during lessons? Is it for taking notes?
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#43 BabyGrand

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Posted 22 November 2019 - 21:40

I think that children would possibly switch off a bit if they knew we were 2 minutes away from the end of the lesson - and adults may feel pressured, especially if we are trying to "get something right" . I do feel it is my job to keep track of time, not theirs.

 

I do have a clock in my teaching room.  I personally need something very visual as timekeeping is not my strong suit!  :ninja:  :lol:  It doesn't have numbers on, so it's less easy for younger children to tell the time from it - many of them don't even realise it's a clock!  I do sometimes notice children who wear watches / trackers looking at the time on there, but I've hardly ever had anyone looking at the clock.  

 

Different strokes, I guess.  :)  (Ha, no pun intended!  :D )


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#44 maggiemay

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Posted 22 November 2019 - 22:43

 

I agree a clock can be distracting.
I use an i-pad when teaching, and it shows the time, at the top of the screen, just visible to me, but unlikely to be to anyone else.  
I find that ideal.


That’s a good idea. May I ask what you use your iPad for during lessons? Is it for taking notes?

 

I keep a rough lesson plan, and note briefly what we do, what works, what I didn’t have time for ...! 

Sometimes to find a clip / performance for a student to hear. 


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#45 RPassacaglia

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Posted 22 November 2019 - 22:53

I agree a clock can be distracting.
I use an i-pad when teaching, and it shows the time, at the top of the screen, just visible to me, but unlikely to be to anyone else.  
I find that ideal.


That’s a good idea. May I ask what you use your iPad for during lessons? Is it for taking notes?
I keep a rough lesson plan, and note briefly what we do, what works, what I didn’t have time for ...! 
Sometimes to find a clip / performance for a student to hear.

Thanks. I may start doing that. The advantage of using your iPad to check the time is that you know it will be exactly right, unlike a lot of clocks which inevitably start to run fast or slow I find.
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