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This forum is becoming depressing - post happy stories about teaching


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#1 ma non troppo

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Posted 19 September 2019 - 00:17

I've recently been considering stopping even visiting this forum, which is a shame as it has been a positive platform in the past.

I understand people need a place to vent from time to time but let's be honest - we don't exactly have the worst jobs in the world!

So please, let us post positive things in at least this one thread!

Tell us about something good that happened in your teaching this week, or something to look forward to.

I will go first -

I have some interesting challenges coming up - I am going to start teaching a very bright 4 year old this week. This will be the youngest student I have taken on for a while but I have met them, played some games with them and I think they will cope with My first Piano Adventure. It is going to be an interesting experience - and I am expecting a lot of fun and sitting on the floor and moving about the room in the lessons!
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#2 Latin pianist

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Posted 19 September 2019 - 05:48

Despite my moaning about not having many advanced students, I am really enjoying this year's teaching . I have a retired couple sharing a lesson. We laugh a lot but they are progressing and delighted to play wellknown tunes.One of my students at school who played Einaudi all last year has asked to play Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring so have found a nice arrangement for her. Another home student is learning the proper version of Clair de Lune even though it's a little-known advanced for her. I do feel lucky to have a job I love but having been in some of the unhappy situations posters describe, it is good that people can vent and get advice here. I enjoy reading about teaching methods and repertoire. There don't seem as many posts of that sort as there used to be.I read the forum every day and actually get a lot of pleasure from it so please don't leave, ma non troppo, as I enjoy your posts as an experienced teacher.
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#3 ten left thumbs

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Posted 19 September 2019 - 08:15

I just love teaching!

 

I had a student (beginner) who told me from the start of the lesson she couldn't play Mrs White because she couldn't find la in it (I teach piano starting with relative solfa). We did a new tune first and I got her to say whether each note was a line note or a space note. Then we went back to Mrs White. I asked her if she could tell me for each note, whether it was a line note or a space note. She looked at the page. "Ah, now I see la!" she said. Honest, I laughed so hard! :D


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#4 Dorcas

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Posted 19 September 2019 - 08:17

I am rather enjoying Tangoallegro's thread about working as an expectant mother and afterwards.  I also find looking for positive outcomes for the teachers down in the dumps energising.  The threads I have started which have been negative, have pretty much resulted in well thought out responses and changes in behaviour, both in myself and my students.  Don't dis the dissers!!

 

By the way, I have returning students, some after very long summer holidays, they need a bit of extra support and revision, but are clearly buzzing happily away inthe lesson.


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#5 Gran'piano

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Posted 19 September 2019 - 08:40

Not music, but teaching all the same. Permitted here?
Gave a talk on the difficulties in communicating successfully with folk of a different mother tongue, a  different generation, a different culture. It went down well and the folk actually understood what I was getting at. Inside I was glowing!


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#6 jenny

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Posted 19 September 2019 - 09:44

I have some interesting challenges coming up - I am going to start teaching a very bright 4 year old this week. This will be the youngest student I have taken on for a while but I have met them, played some games with them and I think they will cope with My first Piano Adventure. It is going to be an interesting experience - and I am expecting a lot of fun and sitting on the floor and moving about the room in the lessons!

 

I have taught quite a few 4 year olds and have often been surprised by how well they do. I remember taking on two 4 year olds when I lived in Norway and they both did really well, using tutor books aimed at the 4 - 6 age group and also doing theory from the start, thanks to the Lina Ng sticker books. However, they were both close to being 5 years old and that can make a big difference. I'm sure you'll enjoy your new pupil - it will be lots of fun for you both!  


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#7 Aquarelle

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Posted 19 September 2019 - 09:55

I had a great first week back with most of my pupils having done at least some of their holiday work and all being pleased to be back. The second week was also good and now I am at the middle of the third week and still smiling. A little boy's mother came to chat about how excited her son was to have finished Piano Adventures Primer and how delighted he was to get the next book. A boy with very bad asthma insisted on coming to his lesson as he didn't want to miss it. I have started  English-### music lessons with a 15 year old girl who has just started her lycée years in the European section of her lycée and we have started a series of songs which she will sing in English while learning to accompany herself -  not pop songs!. A grandmother brought me a couple of kilos of grapes from her own vines. I do have a moan now and again and I do have problems to solve but it's all part of the challenge  but I wouldn't want to do anything else for a living! :)  :)  :)


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#8 LoneM

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Posted 19 September 2019 - 10:45

I have started  English-### music lessons with a 15 year old girl who has just started her lycée years in the European section of her lycée and we have started a series of songs which she will sing in English while learning to accompany herself

 

Just wondering what triggered the forum swear-bot ... you're not teaching her rugby songs, I hope? :o   :lol:


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#9 Banjogirl

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Posted 19 September 2019 - 10:45

We have two singing leaders at my singing group for people living with dementia. The other one is a little bit up himself, so I was delighted when when one of our clients sneaked up to me one day and said, 'I like it best when you're in charge, Banjogirl.' Lovely lady.
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#10 maggiemay

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Posted 19 September 2019 - 10:49

Without exception, all of my students had done something over the holidays. Some more than others, of course - but all came prepared. That’s always a really encouraging start to the new school year.

One boy had taught himself ‘Valse Triste’ from Piano Time pieces - book 2 I think - LH crosses over RH / pedal needed. I hadn’t helped him with it last term, but had simply showed it as a future piece he might like to play - oh - and got an older boy to sight read it for him.

I certainly didn’t expect him to bring it more or less completed!

The two wanting to start preparing for their next grade had got hold of the books. : -)

A student brought me a basket of home-grown tomatoes.
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#11 Aquarelle

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Posted 19 September 2019 - 10:56

 

I have started  English-### music lessons with a 15 year old girl who has just started her lycée years in the European section of her lycée and we have started a series of songs which she will sing in English while learning to accompany herself

 

Just wondering what triggered the forum swear-bot ... you're not teaching her rugby songs, I hope? :o   :lol:

 

 I actually wrote English- c-u-m -music as in the Latin for "with"!!  The only thing I can think of is that perhaps I made a typo and put  an "s" before the "c" and perhaps that word isn't allowed - even if it can quite politely mean what you get round the edge of your sink when you haven't cleaned it!   :D


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#12 Banjogirl

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Posted 19 September 2019 - 11:54

I think it's c-u-m which is the problem...


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#13 Aquarelle

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Posted 19 September 2019 - 12:54

Ah! I'm afraid I had to look up alternative and shady meanings as I had - in my innocence - no idea!! Never come across it!  i just learnt it along with all those other Latin prepositions!!


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#14 ma non troppo

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Posted 19 September 2019 - 13:12

I am laughing out loud at the last few posts!
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#15 Piano Meg

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Posted 19 September 2019 - 14:24

One of mine had been struggling with a grade 1 piece last term, I think due to practice issues. We'd work on the rhythm in the lesson, she'd get it sorted and be confident with it by the end of the lesson, and then she'd come back the next week with the wrong rhythm/no pulse again. After a number of weeks trying different methods with the same result, I told her not to play it, but just to listen to the cd, and we worked on another piece. I told her the same thing for the summer - don't play, just listen. The first week back, she confidently played the other piece (some minor rhythm mistakes but nothing like the first piece, and with great expression) and reported that she'd followed my instructions and had just been listening to the other one. We worked on it in the lesson and... to my delight, she came back last week with the correct rhythm and a discernible pulse and metre :D I'm so happy for her. She can now enjoy the end-product of the work she'd previously put into the notes and co-ordination, and I think she'll manage Grade 1 this term, which will really please both her and her family!

 

Success is wonderful, but success after struggle is such a joy to behold!


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