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Poll: Why Did You Become A Teacher?


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Poll: Why Did You Become a Teacher? (27 member(s) have cast votes)

Principally, which closest matches why you became an instrument/music teacher?

  1. The job allowed for flexibility giving a good work-life balance, including the options of working from home or part-time. (4 votes [14.81%])

    Percentage of vote: 14.81%

  2. I was good at <insert instrument(s)>/found it easy to learn when I was young and I wanted/needed to be my own boss but this was my only/main skill at the time. (1 votes [3.70%])

    Percentage of vote: 3.70%

  3. I wanted to play professionally but ultimately I wasn’t good enough, so this was my only real option at the time. (1 votes [3.70%])

    Percentage of vote: 3.70%

  4. If I’m honest I didn’t really want to be a teacher, but I was good at <insert instrument(s)>/found it easy to learn when I was young and so I could make a living out of it. (2 votes [7.41%])

    Percentage of vote: 7.41%

  5. Music/instrument tuition was in my family so it was a natural progression. (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  6. My real passion is understanding the neruo- and psychological fundamentals of learning (andragogy, heutagogy and pedagogy) and this is just one way that allows me to myself to find new ways to teach.I hate using the same core set of teaching materials. (1 votes [3.70%])

    Percentage of vote: 3.70%

  7. It’s not a “job”, it’s a total and utter vocation that I was always destined for! My life IS instrument/music teaching. I (would) happily teach for virtually nothing and live in an old caravan! (5 votes [18.52%])

    Percentage of vote: 18.52%

  8. I was good at <insert instrument(s)>/found it easy to learn when I was young and I quite liked the idea of teaching good pupils who were like me at that age. To be honest I struggle with slow learners & wish I didn’t have them. (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  9. I wish I could say for purely altruistic reasons, however in reality it’s for largely selfish reasons – I just love seeing pupils develop, no matter by how little or a lot. It makes ME feel good/happy. (2 votes [7.41%])

    Percentage of vote: 7.41%

  10. None of the above remotely matches my principal reason. (11 votes [40.74%])

    Percentage of vote: 40.74%

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#1 Ligneo Fistula

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Posted 24 October 2019 - 17:17

Just being nosey!


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#2 Latin pianist

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Posted 24 October 2019 - 17:42

I didn't find any of them were quite applicable to me, but I have chosen the closest reason.
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#3 RPassacaglia

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Posted 24 October 2019 - 22:23

I also chose the closest reason. It’s pretty close. For me music teaching is a vocation, but not sure I’d be happy doing it for almost nothing and living in an old caravan. Although, now that I think about it, that’s almost what I have been doing for the past 20 years ....
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#4 bevpiano

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Posted 24 October 2019 - 23:25

For me, it is a vocation but it doesn't mean I'd be happy doing for next to nothing. I could do with some more money but the most important thing for me is to spend my life doing what I want to do. I love teaching and I love continue to develop my own playing and performance skills. I don't think I'd be happy in any other career.
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#5 Ligneo Fistula

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Posted 25 October 2019 - 09:56

Thanks to those who have voted.

 

The majority so far have responded "None of the above remotely matches my principal reason." and it would be welcome and interesting to know the actual reasons.


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#6 Misterioso

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Posted 25 October 2019 - 10:21

I voted for the last on the list, because I more or less fell into teaching by chance. One of my children was having violin lessons with a local teacher who also taught some piano pupils. She knew that I played too, and when she moved away she asked me if I could take a handful of them. It grew from there. 


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#7 Piano Meg

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Posted 25 October 2019 - 10:35

Bits of the above choices apply to me now (I love teaching, love my pupils, appreciate the fact that I can choose the times/days I work to fit around other responsibilities), but none of them really apply to how I started.

 

I was asked by a friend's friend to teach her daughter. At that point, I had a background in other teaching, but no music teaching qualification (or music degree), so I advised them to find a 'proper teacher'. Their main concern was to have a teacher who would be kind to their daughter, after the mother's bad experience as a child. After telling them no a number of times, I finally agreed. Others heard about it, and it went on from there. I think of it as a gift - it came out of nowhere and it's a delight to do something you enjoy as your profession. The only bits I don't like are payment/t&c related, and they get easier with the advice from this forum! :D


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#8 Norway

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Posted 25 October 2019 - 11:06

Same as RuthP and bevpiano.

 

Edit: And it keeps me off the streets I suppose.


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#9 ma non troppo

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Posted 25 October 2019 - 14:42

I drifted into it after my music degree and I am still doing it 29 years later. I just did a bit of part time teaching for a while whilst I decided what I wanted to do with my life, but then a local teacher retired and passed on all her pupils to me. So I decided to do it full time. It grew heads from there - I found I had a "talent" for teaching and now I have my own purpose built studio which I funded entirely from teaching income and work probably ridiculous hours. I need to earn money and doubt I will ever stop unless forced to by old age or illness. Although I enjoy it, money is the main reason - and it is better to be your own boss. Music was always the thing I was best at. I would massively cut down if I suddenly became rich. I would probably still do a bit though as I don't think it is good for your health to be idle.
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#10 Aquarelle

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Posted 25 October 2019 - 15:06

I just loved music and enjoyed  my own secondary schooling. It seemed natural to go into teaching. And I had gone off wanting to be a vet. Oh, and i was madly in love with one of my music teachers.


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#11 jenny

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Posted 25 October 2019 - 16:16

I have always wanted to be a piano teacher and so did a teachers course at music college rather than a performers one. I started teaching while I was still a student and haven't stopped since! I did some school teaching when I lived abroad, but still taught piano as well. I can't imagine myself doing anything else, because I enjoy it so much.


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#12 ma non troppo

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Posted 25 October 2019 - 16:19

Oh, and i was madly in love with one of my music teachers.


Ah, that old chestnut!
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#13 Ligneo Fistula

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Posted 26 October 2019 - 18:46

 

Oh, and i was madly in love with one of my music teachers.


Ah, that old chestnut!

 

Missed that one! :rofl:


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#14 Dr. Rogers

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Posted 28 October 2019 - 16:01

 

Oh, and i was madly in love with one of my music teachers.


Ah, that old chestnut!

 

 

It happens, unfortunately.  And it's extremely inconvenient when it does, especially for a married male teacher!  And it's downright scary when the student is a minor!  That's one reason why I prefer to have another adult around when I teach minors - either the students' parent, or at least my wife or mother-in-law.


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#15 Ligneo Fistula

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Posted 28 October 2019 - 20:47

I suspect this will be very controversial, but to me a vocation is literally an all-encompassing calling (e.g. religious/spiritual (original meaning) or whatever) and therefore someone following their calling would be prepared to do it for nothing if have to.  If you have put a price on it then it's not a genuine calling, but rather something you have the skills for and can make some sort of a living out of.</devils advocate>


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