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Aaaaaaaaaggghh - The Scream Thread!


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#23146 Hedgehog

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Posted 17 October 2021 - 15:41

 

Aaaargh ... I do wish politicians, reporters and commentators would stop referring to the pandemic in the past tense - one even said "Now the pandemic is over" yesterday. We currently have 45,000 new cases a day of Covid-19, one of the highest rates in Europe (again) and while many cases are less serious now that we have vaccines, more than 700 people a day are bad enough to require admission to our hard-pressed hospitals. More than 5 million folk have still not been fully vaccinated, leaving us well short of the desired 85% vaccination rate for the Delta variant.

According to figures released by the ONS today, just over one million people in the UK are estimated to have had Covid in the week to 9 October - the highest figure since the end of January - 1 in 20 (some 50,000) of whom are likely to suffer "long covid". This pandemic is far from over.

One of the final nails in the coffin of somewhere I have worked happily for 34 years was being told, breezily, by a member of SLT, 'Now we're post-Covid we can all get back to normal!'

 

:(

 

Many of our schools have gone "back to normal". I get this info from pupils who arrive at my house for their lesson and are very happy to adopt the same measures that I operated on since going back to face-to-face lessons. The Covid number for our postcode has gone through the roof - it's about 800! We have at least 10 schools within a mile radius.

Last week, the boys' school apparently back-tracked a little and pupils now have to wear masks in communal areas and the canteen. (My source of info said the Y7s were hardest hit.) 

Someone in authority needs to explain clearly what the "end" of the pandemic involves - I've only heard 1 coherent explanation on the radio and that was buried in a R4 current affairs kind of programme.


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#23147 AdLibitum

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Posted 17 October 2021 - 17:58

What was the R4 explanation, Hedgehog? So far I haven't heard any, the commonly accepted definition seems to be that it'll be over when we get tired of the precautions...
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#23148 Hedgehog

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Posted 17 October 2021 - 21:08

What was the R4 explanation, Hedgehog? So far I haven't heard any, the commonly accepted definition seems to be that it'll be over when we get tired of the precautions...

Apparently the end of the pandemic would be when somebody in authority (maybe WHO or similar) declared Covid-19 endemic (or generally found within the population). In fact there now seems to be a little bit more along those lines if you search online. 


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#23149 AdLibitum

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Posted 17 October 2021 - 21:14

Thanks, Hedgehog! So if I understand that correctly, when the bug is in circulation but no longer presents a problem that would require significant changes to society. Like other infectious diseases that people get from time to time, I suppose. That makes sense.

I imagine one of the most important factors in this will be how long immunity lasts.
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#23150 Hedgehog

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Posted 17 October 2021 - 21:37

Thanks, Hedgehog! So if I understand that correctly, when the bug is in circulation but no longer presents a problem that would require significant changes to society. Like other infectious diseases that people get from time to time, I suppose. That makes sense.

I imagine one of the most important factors in this will be how long immunity lasts.

Yes - and whether the virus evolves so that it becomes less harmful.  This would obviously be a long process.  I wonder if it'll be one of those situations like we have with the flu virus where more vulnerable individuals receive an annual vaccination.  Hopefully some boffins are working on how much immunity we are actually getting/keeping from the jabs in terms of our T-cell system.


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#23151 Aquarelle

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Posted 18 October 2021 - 16:18

The French government has a policy of keeping elderly people in their homes as long as possible. However this is becoming inoperable because they have no policy for the training of helpers, the support of carers or for making these jobs financially viable.These things do exist but far from meet the demand. The result is that in a rural area like mine there is a huge shortage of people to come and either help with the houswork or the nursing. The doctor told me today that she had exhausted all possibilites and none of her enquiries had been fruitful. The social assistant promised to ring back  to arrange a visit to establish our needs - but never has. And the latest is that my partner came home from hospital with a prescription for a series of physiotherapy sessions and my efforts to find a physiotherapist have been fruitless. None of the ones I contacted were willing to do home visits.

 

On the plus side the doctor has given me a prescription for a "patient lift" - as she said so that I don't break my back. What I really need is a prescription for one of those Japanese robots that does all the tasks with which I have difficulty. Oh well, I suppose it's a start.


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#23152 AdLibitum

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Posted 18 October 2021 - 21:17

How difficult for you and your partner, Aquarelle.

My own aaarrgh is small in comparison - I've knitted up a second sleeve and it's about half am inch shorter than the first one! (I have the correct number of rows in both.) I mush have tightened my gauge a lot. Probably by trying to knit neat stitches. Sigh.
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#23153 Hildegard

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Posted 19 October 2021 - 07:02

 

I imagine one of the most important factors in this will be how long immunity lasts.

Yes - and whether the virus evolves so that it becomes less harmful.

 

 

One of the current worries, as the BBC points out this morning, is that "The more virus there is about, the more chances there are for it to break through the defences of vaccines" - and there is now one heck of a lot of virus about. New infections are running at almost 50,000 a day, up to the level of 17th July when social distancing restrictions were still in operation and before pubs and restaurants were allowed to operate at full capacity.
 


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#23154 AdLibitum

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Posted 19 October 2021 - 07:12



I imagine one of the most important factors in this will be how long immunity lasts.

Yes - and whether the virus evolves so that it becomes less harmful.

One of the current worries, as the BBC points out this morning, is that "The more virus there is about, the more chances there are for it to break through the defences of vaccines" - and there is now one heck of a lot of virus about. New infections are running at almost 50,000 a day, up to the level of 17th July when social distancing restrictions were still in operation and before pubs and restaurants were allowed to operate at full capacity.
Yes. It is madness.
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#23155 Banjogirl

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Posted 19 October 2021 - 07:51

A lot of people are acting as if the pandemic is over. When restrictions were lifted, apparently most people called on being very cautious. Seemingly that is no longer the case. It's very alarming. I've not gone back to my de MN entis singing because they're in a relatively small room with no mitigations apart from opening the two doors (no windows), neither of which go to the outside! They sit round tables to have their tea and then in a circle singing at each other. If anyone comes with the virus (two volunteers have had it, luckily symptoms appearing just before and not just after a session, so they didn't go) it is going to spread there. It feels wildly irresponsible. The church choir is similar - rehearsing in the narrow choir stalls with no masks, as if there were no Covid.
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#23156 Nine and a Half Fingers

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Posted 19 October 2021 - 10:04

A lot of people are acting as if the pandemic is over....

 

I travelled by train several times last week - hardly a mask in sight.
 


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#23157 Gordon Shumway

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Posted 19 October 2021 - 11:28

I still wear a mask in shops and trains, but it doesn't protect.


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#23158 Latin pianist

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Posted 19 October 2021 - 11:55

I think it’s supposed to stop you passing it on. I find it hard to believe a minuscule virus can’t get through a mask. I have read articles saying that only the top spec medical ones are effective. I do still wear one in shops and at church.

Just read an article saying that the main benefit is that it reminds us the virus is still out there.


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#23159 Tenor Viol

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Posted 19 October 2021 - 12:18

Yes, viruses are small, but this one is spread through attachment to water droplets in aerosols, which is why masks help to reduce transmission rates. Obviously, there are degrees of effectiveness depending on the quality of the mask.


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#23160 Hedgehog

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Posted 19 October 2021 - 12:19

I think it’s supposed to stop you passing it on. I find it hard to believe a minuscule virus can’t get through a mask. I have read articles saying that only the top spec medical ones are effective. I do still wear one in shops and at church.

Just read an article saying that the main benefit is that it reminds us the virus is still out there.

I'm sure virus particles can get through, or perhaps round, basic masks, but I still wear one because a) it will reduce the amount of virus (Covid or otherwise) that I give out into the atmosphere because some will be caught by the mask, and b) it will stop some virus getting to me from anybody else. So I regard it as a means of reducing the amount of virus load rather than total prevention.

I have gone back to 1 choir where we sit in a church, spaced out more than before, with windows open - large building, and not so many of us now.  But I haven't returned to a second choir which now meets in a smaller room (admittedly with windows) because I just feel we'd be on top of each other and there isn't the airspace for dilution of any virus. 


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