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This forum is becoming depressing - post happy stories about teaching


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#16 Banjogirl

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Posted 19 September 2019 - 14:29

Ah! I'm afraid I had to look up alternative and shady meanings as I had - in my innocence - no idea!! Never come across it! i just learnt it along with all those other Latin prepositions!!


Ah, the innocence of youth.
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#17 Gran'piano

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Posted 19 September 2019 - 14:36

Ah! I'm afraid I had to look up alternative and shady meanings as I had - in my innocence - no idea!! Never come across it!  i just learnt it along with all those other Latin prepositions!!

I think that those of us who have lived 'abroad' for a considerable time tend to miss out on new usages, new words and words which, in 'our day', would never have passed a lady's lips having gradually become acceptable. My sister tries to bring me up to date when we meet. I don't use the words myself, old habits die hard, but at least I know what some of them mean.

A positive thought for ma non troppo - a lot of folk get a good laugh when I either use a very old fashioned English word when talking English, or when talking German, use a word which is certainly non acceptable, thinking it meant something else. And the better you speak the language, the worse off you are, as folk think you really knew what you had said.


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#18 funkiepiano

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Posted 19 September 2019 - 16:34

I’ve had a really good start to the new term - very busy, and some lovely newbies young and older ????????????
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#19 tangoallegro

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Posted 19 September 2019 - 19:47

I am rather enjoying Tangoallegro's thread about working as an expectant mother and afterwards.  I also find looking for positive outcomes for the teachers down in the dumps energising.  The threads I have started which have been negative, have pretty much resulted in well thought out responses and changes in behaviour, both in myself and my students.  Don't dis the dissers!!
 
By the way, I have returning students, some after very long summer holidays, they need a bit of extra support and revision, but are clearly buzzing happily away inthe lesson.


Thank you Dorcas, that is very kind. I feel really positive that a job I love has enabled me to start a family and support my baby!
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#20 Dorcas

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Posted 19 September 2019 - 19:56

 

I am rather enjoying Tangoallegro's thread about working as an expectant mother and afterwards.  I also find looking for positive outcomes for the teachers down in the dumps energising.  The threads I have started which have been negative, have pretty much resulted in well thought out responses and changes in behaviour, both in myself and my students.  Don't dis the dissers!!
 
By the way, I have returning students, some after very long summer holidays, they need a bit of extra support and revision, but are clearly buzzing happily away inthe lesson.


Thank you Dorcas, that is very kind. I feel really positive that a job I love has enabled me to start a family and support my baby!

 

You rock! And you will.  xx


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#21 elemimele

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Posted 20 September 2019 - 22:27

not a teacher, and this is a bit marginal, but it's musical and involves music-learning, in an odd sort of way, and it's happy.

I was walking around in our local city with my kid last week, when we both remembered an incident quite a few years ago, when kid (autistic) was scared of almost everything, and particularly of musicians in the street, but was generally quite scared of all humans, and found it hard to interact with people. One evening we were walking in that same bit of the city, just outside the library, and came across a table bearing a motely collection wind instruments, mostly battered brass, a few abused recorders, several plastic vuvuzelas and a flute (I think). Kid went running across to poke, hotly pursued by me, worried he might trash something. We were both intercepted by Nice Lady who was actually a hybrid brass-musician/performance artist, getting ready for an event in which random members of the public would attempt to blow out the candles on an artificial birthday cake using the collection of battered instruments. Because no one else was around, Kid decided to mess around a bit with the instruments, and Nice Lady offered to teach him how to get a note out of a trumpet, properly, by blowing raspberries. She was so patient, so clear, and so communicative, and he followed every word, loved every minute, got really quite good at blowing brass things, and stuck around for the actual event. It was his first musical experience with a stranger, and the first time he was able to tolerate anything like that. I have no idea who the lady was, or what she's doing now, but I will be eternally grateful.

Moral of the story: sometimes you probably don't know the good you've done... people might be remembering you, even when you've forgotten them... be happy, all of you who have helped someone do something musical, you can be quite life-changing.


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#22 Gran'piano

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Posted 21 September 2019 - 01:15

Elemimele: "this is a bit marginal..."
Marginal? Forget it!
This is a wonderful, uplifting story and teaching and learning of the highest order.
Hope it warms ma non troppo's heart like it warmed mine.
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#23 zwhe

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Posted 21 September 2019 - 13:37

I had two little ones start piano lessons at Easter who are both doing really well. They understand how notation works and are learning the notes. I had another two start over the summer who look as if they will be the same. All four have supportive parents who practise with them. Its so rewarding when they are making good progress.


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#24 Norway

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Posted 21 September 2019 - 16:04

Child whose parents couldn't afford to buy her a keyboard is actually doing better using a cardboard one than some pupils who have real keyboards and pianos! :)


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#25 Hedgehog

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Posted 21 September 2019 - 21:59

Reading elemimele's story prompted a memory which is only vaguely associated with music.

My son was scared of dogs when he was little, he'd cross the road rather than walk past a dog on the same path. We went to collect my DD from her violin lesson one day and had to stand and talk to the teacher for a few minutes.  Teacher had an elderly dog, spaniel type I think, which was so placid and never barked.  Anyway, after a minute or so I realised that DS was patting and stroking the dog - not worried at all about it.  I told the teacher that it was wonderful to see and she said that she often took the dog to see her father who was in a residential home and all the residents loved the dog and would pat her. :)


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#26 Dorcas

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Posted 22 September 2019 - 13:20

not a teacher, and this is a bit marginal, but it's musical and involves music-learning, in an odd sort of way, and it's happy.

I was walking around in our local city with my kid last week, when we both remembered an incident quite a few years ago, when kid (autistic) was scared of almost everything, and particularly of musicians in the street, but was generally quite scared of all humans, and found it hard to interact with people. One evening we were walking in that same bit of the city, just outside the library, and came across a table bearing a motely collection wind instruments, mostly battered brass, a few abused recorders, several plastic vuvuzelas and a flute (I think). Kid went running across to poke, hotly pursued by me, worried he might trash something. We were both intercepted by Nice Lady who was actually a hybrid brass-musician/performance artist, getting ready for an event in which random members of the public would attempt to blow out the candles on an artificial birthday cake using the collection of battered instruments. Because no one else was around, Kid decided to mess around a bit with the instruments, and Nice Lady offered to teach him how to get a note out of a trumpet, properly, by blowing raspberries. She was so patient, so clear, and so communicative, and he followed every word, loved every minute, got really quite good at blowing brass things, and stuck around for the actual event. It was his first musical experience with a stranger, and the first time he was able to tolerate anything like that. I have no idea who the lady was, or what she's doing now, but I will be eternally grateful.

Moral of the story: sometimes you probably don't know the good you've done... people might be remembering you, even when you've forgotten them... be happy, all of you who have helped someone do something musical, you can be quite life-changing.

 

Child whose parents couldn't afford to buy her a keyboard is actually doing better using a cardboard one than some pupils who have real keyboards and pianos! :)

 

 

I particularly these two stories.  Occasionally, after an absence of a few years, students return to me, after having different piano teachers.  Usually, I am pleased to see them back!  

 

Happy Sunday folks.  


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#27 Aquarelle

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Posted 23 September 2019 - 10:53

Fourth week of term starts for me tomorrow and I am still enjoying it and looking forward to it! My last class lesson of last week was - shall we say - a little challenging -  but I will get the little b......... in the end. That is part of the fun!


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#28 jenny

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Posted 24 September 2019 - 08:27

I had a lovely surprise yesterday in the lesson of a young pupil who is going to take Grade 1 (piano) in November. I have 4 young ones who I had hoped would be ready this time, but it has turned out that only 2 of them are, mainly because of lack of practice in the summer break. I had invited this girl's mum to sit in last Monday so that we could talk about exam preparation. I stressed the importance of all three pieces being at a certain level before I would submit the exam entries this week. Lo and behold, she came yesterday able to play all three pieces with both hands together and at the correct tempo - just in need of some 'finishing touches'. Her scales, sight reading and aural are already good, so I feel she's really well prepared for her first exam. It shows what an improvement can be made in just one week and I was so pleased with her. She also asked if she could take the Grade 1 Theory exam in the next session. This is a pupil who has often been a real challenge to teach, mainly because of her attitude and there have been many times when I've questioned if I'm the right teacher for her, so I guess it made yesterday's lesson even more of a lovely surprise.       


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#29 Doodle

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Posted 24 September 2019 - 12:36

I'm visiting the forum infrequently these days, but what a lovely thread of posts to read!  Made coming back so worthwhile :)

 

I have had a good start to the term with all my pupils working happily.  Second year of not teaching in a school and I am SO pleased I jumped off that ship!


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#30 Dorcas

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Posted 26 September 2019 - 11:59

My cat has learned, for the time being, not to jump through the window bearing small gifts of local wildlife, during lesson time at least.  Currently, she is working on bringing down the spider population in the spare room.

 

:ninja: 


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