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What hours do you teach?


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#16 Norway

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Posted 24 October 2019 - 10:27

Exactly! Apparently we're supposed to work for free! I've been over generous in the past and am now very selective about who I choose to help and how much. It seems to me that the more you do, the less people respect you.


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#17 Piano Meg

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Posted 24 October 2019 - 10:37

His response was that it was purely a money-making scheme on my part and that piano was not on their remit. It was a very abrupt email and he never even thanked me for all the voluntary work I had done! When I started teaching from home, the school asked someone else to play for them, very hurtful and disappointing.

 

Wow! If the head of instrumental tuition is saying that, it doesn't bode well for the tuition provided... or for the teachers under his 'care'! It's horrible for that to be said to anyone, let alone someone who's given so much to the school! Just... wow!


One adult in particular always messes me about, cancels frequently with 10 mins notice, doesn’t pay termly like all my other pupils and then doesn’t bring the cash weekly as promised because she can’t afford it and is always needing to change her day and time. So I’m thinking it might be better just to let her leave!
 

 

Yes - that definitely sounds like someone you can do without! I'm sure her lesson days will be a lot less stressful if she stops! And if she were to change her mind and want to keep her current slot, you have the option of saying a) when you asked for a different time, I made other plans and that time is no longer available (eg. because you're going to be doing your shopping/laundry/professional development/washing your hair/ having a coffee then) or b) you can have the slot back, but these are the conditions - fees paid in full at the beginning of the term, no changes, and whatever missed lessons/late notice policy you have/want. Some pupils need to have boundaries very firmly put in place to avoid them wasting our time (unknowingly or knowingly). Others don't seem to manage boundaries at all.


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#18 fizzyorange

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Posted 24 October 2019 - 12:00

I teach from 4pm Mon - Thur (various finishing times), and teach most of my adult learners on a Friday morning, although I have recently allowed some adults to take evening slots, as they work full time. I have two adults that alternate each week in an evening slot, which is quite a good compromise, but you have to be organised to make sure it works. The adults come at the later slots, or last slot, so if they cancel I can an early finish.

 

I too have done the volunteering at local school thing, then asked if I can use school time to do private teaching and had the knock back. I think it's difficult for the headteachers to justify it, even when they are being offered volunteer hours as a kind of quid pro quo. They have to get permission from the powers that be, who usually don't allow this sort of set up (even though it would be very popular among parents, I am sure, as it saves the having to take their child to an after school lesson).

 

I know most Scottish schools don't do piano, but some do (Falkirk Region does). But why not explore doing some teaching in private schools? They always have a high number of piano students. I have a role in a private school which is two mornings of teaching, so fits in quite well with my afternoon schedule at home. I get a couple of hours break between the two jobs (once commuting is taken into account) and it's nice to have colleagues to chat to, and a change of scene.


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#19 mel2

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Posted 24 October 2019 - 13:40

Interesting to learn that about schools in Scotland - I had no idea. Perhaps that explains the campaigning zeal for improved music education from people like Nicola Benedetti and Richard Holloway, both Scots themselves.

(I wonder how the take-up for pipes is going... although there is a pipe and drum group in the town where I live in Yorks)

What an odious remark from the headteacher. Who would want to be answerable to such a man?
Being self-employed may not be all that secure but at least you can set your own standards and run things your way.
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#20 Misterioso

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Posted 24 October 2019 - 21:33

Schools in Scotland only offer violin, brass and chanter/pipes lessons, piano is not ‘on their remit’.

 

I tend not to agree with this. Whilst I am not based on the mainland, I am in Scotland, and the above are available, but also piano, keyboard and guitar.


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#21 maggiemay

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Posted 25 October 2019 - 08:28

When my children were growing up, I made it a fair priority to finish teaching by about 6.30, so that we could all eat together. It was sometimes a scramble, but there was a hot meal on the table most nights around 7.

 

It meant that I mostly taught either children after school, or adults who were free to come during the day or by 6pm. I did turn down a few who were not available at the times I wanted to teach, of course, and sometimes it was not easy to say no - but on the whole it worked out well, and I had as much as I wanted to do at that time. 

 

It was important to have time for the family too, and I don’t regret it one bit now that they are grown up. 


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#22 musicalmalc

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Posted 25 October 2019 - 10:05

If you reach out to some groups e.g. U3A (you can probably think of others), you may find additional adult pupils who can have lessons earlier in the day, probably quite a few who may have played a bit when they were young who would consider restarting given a gentle prod


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#23 DMC

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Posted 25 October 2019 - 12:42

3 days a week I begin lessons at 7.45am, going on till 4 or 6 depending on the day. On Thursdays it's 7.45-10.30, and then 4 till 7. Fridays I teach 3 till 6.

 

Used to do crazy late night teaching when I needed to, along with home visits, which I also no longer do. I used to occasionally do weekends to catch up on missed lessons, but I now resolutely refuse to do them, without excception. Work life balance is important. I need to be able to write, practice, play a gig, mow the lawn, drop the kids off at a party, go for a pint, go to the gym -  or simply do nothing and relax.

If you're self employed, it's important to reap the benefits - one of which is the flexible working hours.


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#24 tangoallegro

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Posted 26 October 2019 - 18:37

I teach in schools 3 days a week. I teach at home 4:30-6:30pm two nights a week and work both days at weekends with an early finish. I have two days off a week.

My first baby is due next year so I will be moving my private teaching around to ensure that I have an early finish to have tea as a family and put the baby to bed.  My own mother was self employed and I paid the price as a child always feeling second best to her work. Do what is best for your family - I agree with DMC reap the benefits and make it work for you.  


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#25 mel2

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Posted 26 October 2019 - 19:00

Interesting that no one has expressed an opinion about dads and their work schedules.
It always seems to fall to the mother/grandmother to rearrange her career to fit around the family,even in this day and age. For the OP it was inescapable as her husband works away.
Not a judgement or criticism, just an observation from reading this thread and similar ones on other fora.
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#26 jenny

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Posted 26 October 2019 - 20:10

It's interesting to compare

 

Interesting that no one has expressed an opinion about dads and their work schedules.
It always seems to fall to the mother/grandmother to rearrange her career to fit around the family,even in this day and age. For the OP it was inescapable as her husband works away.
Not a judgement or criticism, just an observation from reading this thread and similar ones on other fora.

 

It's interesting to compare the UK with other countries. My eldest son lives in Norway, where the one year maternity/paternity leave is often shared. When my grandson was born, my son took the whole year off work and because the baby was born very prematurely, he was also given an extra three months off, with full pay.   


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#27 tangoallegro

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Posted 26 October 2019 - 21:50

Interesting that no one has expressed an opinion about dads and their work schedules.
It always seems to fall to the mother/grandmother to rearrange her career to fit around the family,even in this day and age. For the OP it was inescapable as her husband works away.
Not a judgement or criticism, just an observation from reading this thread and similar ones on other fora.

I feel very proud and privileged to say that my husband is in the same line of work and he will be making the same changes to his working life as I am once our baby arrives.  For us we are a team and I feel very lucky as I know not every mother has this level of support.  I will be able to return to work as he will, we will support each other to make this happen.  


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#28 Stringshed

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Posted 26 October 2019 - 23:30

Interesting thread.

 

I teach 4-8pm (ish) Monday to Wednesday, with the odd half-hour stolen to eat dinner together or deliver/collect my teenagers to/from their various activities. I am becoming painfully aware that my eldest will be ready to leave school (home :( ) in 2 years and my youngest in 5, so for now, lessons must fit in with family priorities. Things will be very different in a handful of years and I am fortunate that my income is not a deciding factor.

 

On the subject of music in Scottish schools, I live in Central Scotland and we are very well served with instrumental tuition in all areas- strings, brass, piano/keyboard, woodwind and pipes/chanter. It sounds as though you have a rather unpleasant character in charge up there Suzy, I'm sorry to hear that.

 

Best Wishes

 

SS.


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#29 Aeolienne

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Posted 29 October 2019 - 16:39

Interesting to learn that about schools in Scotland - I had no idea. Perhaps that explains the campaigning zeal for improved music education from people like Nicola Benedetti and Richard Holloway, both Scots themselves.

To date Nicola is the only Scottish winner of BBC Young Musician. :(


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#30 thara96

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Posted 30 October 2019 - 12:41

My mom is a freelance music teacher. She finishes at 5.30pm so she can have dinner before seven. Her lessons take place during the week, she does not work weekends. Currently she teaches 8am to 5pm five days a week. On weekends, she likes to be on her deck relaxing, exercising in the gym or spending time with me and my little sister who is almost 6 now. It is always important to make time for family members. 

 

 Every year in September, she gives out a copy of her teaching/exam schedule. Hours when she teaches are green, hours when she is unavailable are red. Perhaps try that? She finds it cuts down on misunderstandings and mistakes are avoided. My mom has been a piano and music theory teacher, private since 2001. She is the only private piano teacher in her area so she is fully booked. Her price is £10 for lessons. 


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