Jump to content


Photo

student discontinuing lessons


  • Please log in to reply
37 replies to this topic

#1 adultpianist

adultpianist

    Prodigy

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1098 posts
  • Member: 888829
    Joined: 04-August 14

Posted 12 September 2019 - 12:27

I am not a teacher but posting on this page to get some advice.    I have decided not to continue with flute lessons.    I have too much going on and it would be too stressful to fit the lessons in at the moment.   I texted the teacher and explained and thanked her for what she had taught me so far.   That was 5 days ago and I have not heard from her.   My next lesson was scheduled for next Friday.   I presume I will hear from her prior to the lesson which I am not attending.      If any pupil decides to stop lessons and texts or emails you to let you know, how soon would you respond?    Would you as the teacher formally end the lessons by way of saying ok thanks for letting me know and I wish you all the best.      I have decided to practice on my own at home when I can and I can practice everything I have been taught so far and when things calm down in my life return to formal .    I think I have been quite polite to thank the teacher because I have been taught some useful techniques to which I am going to put into practice so that when I do go back to formal lessons I can take up from where I left off because the danger is if you do not practice then you find yourself back to square one.   I have a friend who took up to Grade 5 piano and she has not played or practiced for so many years that she said if she want back to lessons she would have to start from the beginning again


  • 0

#2 Fazioligirl

Fazioligirl

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 237 posts
  • Member: 893432
    Joined: 03-July 15
  • Kent

Posted 12 September 2019 - 12:45

As a teacher myself I would always respond to a message from a student. Knowing that texts sometimes don’t get delivered if I were in your position I would follow it up with a phone call just to be on the safe side. I know some people feel very embarrassed to tell a teacher they want to stop lessons but there’s absolutely no need to! Sometimes life just gets in the way and something has to take a back seat for a while.
  • 4

#3 KathyB

KathyB

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 201 posts
  • Member: 487205
    Joined: 16-July 12

Posted 12 September 2019 - 13:00

I agree with fazioligirl. If you’ve not had an acknowledgement from your teacher follow it up to make sure they got your message.
  • 3

#4 dorfmouse

dorfmouse

    Prodigy

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1376 posts
  • Member: 1946
    Joined: 18-August 04
  • Germany

Posted 12 September 2019 - 13:44

Yesterday I received a text that had been sent three weeks ago!

Personally I would feel very discourteous to inform a teacher of this by text. I would have turned up at the scheduled lesson and given my thanks and farewells in person.
  • 8

#5 Dorcas

Dorcas

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 999 posts
  • Member: 887843
    Joined: 23-January 14
  • Hertfordshire

Posted 12 September 2019 - 14:12

A text is better than not showing up at all.  


  • 0

#6 adultpianist

adultpianist

    Prodigy

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1098 posts
  • Member: 888829
    Joined: 04-August 14

Posted 12 September 2019 - 14:31

A text is better than not showing up at all.  

I would never just not turn up without contacting the teacher.   If I had not heard anything by the day before the next scheduled lesson i would make a point of contacting the teacher again just to make sure she was aware of the situation but I would never leave the teacher in the lurch.   i am not that rude


  • 0

#7 Dr. Rogers

Dr. Rogers

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 191 posts
  • Member: 898997
    Joined: 17-May 18

Posted 12 September 2019 - 14:58

I would suggest trying another method to contact your teacher.  Texts aren't always reliable.  Ultimately, though, I think it would be better to quit in person.  Go to the final lesson, let the teacher know at the beginning, and hopefully your teacher can give you some pointers for ongoing self-study.

 

Good luck, whatever you resolve to do.

 

Edit: I explicitly tell my students to not text me as I do not receive them in a timely manner.  It could take weeks for me to even see them, as I have to log in on a computer to text them.  I don't even have a cell phone anymore!


  • 2

#8 adultpianist

adultpianist

    Prodigy

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1098 posts
  • Member: 888829
    Joined: 04-August 14

Posted 12 September 2019 - 16:10

I would suggest trying another method to contact your teacher.  Texts aren't always reliable.  Ultimately, though, I think it would be better to quit in person.  Go to the final lesson, let the teacher know at the beginning, and hopefully your teacher can give you some pointers for ongoing self-study.

 

Good luck, whatever you resolve to do.

 

Edit: I explicitly tell my students to not text me as I do not receive them in a timely manner.  It could take weeks for me to even see them, as I have to log in on a computer to text them.  I don't even have a cell phone anymore!

I have just phoned the teacher and left a voicemail saying I had texted her the other day and did she get them.    If I do not hear back after this then there is nothing else I can do.   Of course I can call in at the school and see the person in charge and say I have tried to leave a message by text and phone,      On the matter of not having a cell phone... everyone should have one for safety.   If you were driving somewhere remote and broke down what would you do?   Also if you were late to meet someone you could phone them to say you were held up etc.   In this day and age it is essential.   I only use mine in an emergency and for most phone calls I use my home phone


  • 0

#9 elemimele

elemimele

    Prodigy

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1247 posts
  • Member: 895612
    Joined: 17-July 16

Posted 12 September 2019 - 16:40

Oh, if your teacher teaches from a school and you can leave a message there as well, definitely do so! It's no harm if teacher gets message from two directions. If they've missed your other messages for any reason, it will at least spare them an unexplained no-show. Otherwise, Dr Rogers' suggestion is very sensible, and also helps to leave the door open should you in the future wish to return to your teacher, when the time is right.


  • 1

#10 Banjogirl

Banjogirl

    Virtuoso

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2818 posts
  • Member: 39509
    Joined: 12-September 08

Posted 12 September 2019 - 17:03

Lots of people don't have a smartphone. The world managed pretty well before they came along. They make people over reliant on technology and unable to cope with emergencies so it's a bit rich to suggest they're essential.
  • 4

#11 adultpianist

adultpianist

    Prodigy

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1098 posts
  • Member: 888829
    Joined: 04-August 14

Posted 12 September 2019 - 19:00

Lots of people don't have a smartphone. The world managed pretty well before they came along. They make people over reliant on technology and unable to cope with emergencies so it's a bit rich to suggest they're essential.y

Years ago there were a lot of public phone boxes;   Now most of them have been taken away.    Also if you broke down you could find a phone box.   You would not be so fortunate today.   Also a friend of mine was out walking her dog.   She went into the woods.   She slipped on a went piece of mud and could not get up.   There was nobody about.   She got out her phone and called for an ambulance and was able to guide the paramedics to where she was by a landmark nearby


  • 2

#12 hummingbird

hummingbird

    Prodigy

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1897 posts
  • Member: 491056
    Joined: 25-July 12

Posted 12 September 2019 - 20:19

Also a friend of mine was out walking her dog.   She went into the woods.   She slipped on a went piece of mud and could not get up.   There was nobody about.   She got out her phone and called for an ambulance and was able to guide the paramedics to where she was by a landmark nearby

There's an app that you can get for smart phones which tells the emergency services *exactly* where you are, within a 3m x 3m square.  It's called What3Words and although I hope never to have to use it, it could be a lifeline in an emergency.

https://www.bbc.co.u...ngland-49319760


  • 0

#13 Boogaloo

Boogaloo

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 150 posts
  • Member: 94062
    Joined: 16-March 10

Posted 13 September 2019 - 11:05

I've just read all of these messages to see if I'm the only one who thinks it rude of a pupil to quit by text. I've actually had to put it in my Terms and conditions that students have to contact me personally and speak to me. When someone has been offering a personal teaching service (and often counselling etc too) then surely the least a student giving up can do is attend a final lesson and say so in person? No mention on here has been made of the fact that is also this teacher's income that is suddenly disappearing. How convenient it is for students to forget this, yet if their pay (or pocket money) was docked by a lesson amount (or more) then they would certainly have something to say about it. I'm sorry to be harsh but defend yourself all you like by saying people have mobiles these days etc etc but it doesn't account for a lack of decency and courtesy towards a fellow human.


  • 6

#14 agricola

agricola

    Prodigy

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1807 posts
  • Member: 545
    Joined: 01-February 04

Posted 13 September 2019 - 12:21

Perhaps I'm the odd one out but I find text or email quite acceptable as a way of ending lessons.  It's just the modern equivalent of sending a letter.  What is annoying is the no-show as it wastes one's time.  I get a lot of job satisfaction from teaching but I don't expect gratitude as well -- although it's always welcome when it comes and especially if accompanied by a bottle of wine :)   Every pupil will leave eventually, which may entail some financial loss, but every business has to suffer that occasionally.

 

Incidentally I agree with what adultpianist says about public phone boxes -- I think you would have to go quite a long way to find one in an emergency now unless you are in a city centre.


  • 2

#15 ma non troppo

ma non troppo

    Prodigy

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1388 posts
  • Member: 76027
    Joined: 23-September 09

Posted 13 September 2019 - 12:49

There can't be many adults under the age of 70 who don't have a smart phone nowadays - they're a brilliant invention in many ways. I don't actually use my landline anymore and have taken the number off my website. The landline has an answering message in case anyone calls me on it telling them to email me.
  • 0