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Poll: Why Did You Become A Teacher?


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Poll: Why Did You Become a Teacher? (27 member(s) have cast votes)

Principally, which closest matches why you became an instrument/music teacher?

  1. The job allowed for flexibility giving a good work-life balance, including the options of working from home or part-time. (4 votes [14.81%])

    Percentage of vote: 14.81%

  2. I was good at <insert instrument(s)>/found it easy to learn when I was young and I wanted/needed to be my own boss but this was my only/main skill at the time. (1 votes [3.70%])

    Percentage of vote: 3.70%

  3. I wanted to play professionally but ultimately I wasn’t good enough, so this was my only real option at the time. (1 votes [3.70%])

    Percentage of vote: 3.70%

  4. If I’m honest I didn’t really want to be a teacher, but I was good at <insert instrument(s)>/found it easy to learn when I was young and so I could make a living out of it. (2 votes [7.41%])

    Percentage of vote: 7.41%

  5. Music/instrument tuition was in my family so it was a natural progression. (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  6. My real passion is understanding the neruo- and psychological fundamentals of learning (andragogy, heutagogy and pedagogy) and this is just one way that allows me to myself to find new ways to teach.I hate using the same core set of teaching materials. (1 votes [3.70%])

    Percentage of vote: 3.70%

  7. It’s not a “job”, it’s a total and utter vocation that I was always destined for! My life IS instrument/music teaching. I (would) happily teach for virtually nothing and live in an old caravan! (5 votes [18.52%])

    Percentage of vote: 18.52%

  8. I was good at <insert instrument(s)>/found it easy to learn when I was young and I quite liked the idea of teaching good pupils who were like me at that age. To be honest I struggle with slow learners & wish I didn’t have them. (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  9. I wish I could say for purely altruistic reasons, however in reality it’s for largely selfish reasons – I just love seeing pupils develop, no matter by how little or a lot. It makes ME feel good/happy. (2 votes [7.41%])

    Percentage of vote: 7.41%

  10. None of the above remotely matches my principal reason. (11 votes [40.74%])

    Percentage of vote: 40.74%

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#16 ma non troppo

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Posted 28 October 2019 - 21:34

I have no problem in saying that money is my primary motivation. We all have to eat. That's not to say I don't go out of my way to help people or I don't enjoy it. I am a business person first though - I am not a charity.

LF - I will take your bait and say in return that someone going into a religious order for example doesn't do it for the absence of financial remuneration.... They have to eat to live after all, and all their earthly needs are taken care of. In some ways it is a quite comfortable deal.
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#17 Ligneo Fistula

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Posted 28 October 2019 - 21:50

I have no problem in saying that money is my primary motivation. We all have to eat. That's not to say I don't go out of my way to help people or I don't enjoy it. I am a business person first though - I am not a charity.

LF - I will take your bait and say in return that someone going into a religious order for example doesn't do it for the absence of financial remuneration.... They have to eat to live after all, and all their earthly needs are taken care of. In some ways it is a quite comfortable deal.

Would you estimate that the vast majority or all saying they teach as a vocation would be prepared to die for it if the pay was, say, half of what it is now?


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#18 ma non troppo

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Posted 28 October 2019 - 22:30

I can't imagine anyone saying they would die for teaching. I'm not quite sure what the point you are trying to make is.
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#19 Ligneo Fistula

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Posted 28 October 2019 - 22:44

I was just prosecuting the suggestion that most claiming teaching as a vocation fall short of the true meaning as an all-encompassing calling to the exclusion of all else; the reality being that it's something they have the skills for and they can make some sort of living out of it.  I'm not making value judgements by the way!


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#20 ma non troppo

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Posted 28 October 2019 - 23:01

Ah, in which case I would tend to agree with you. One never knows though - in these days of rampant virtue signalling, someone may yet state they would die for the cause!
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#21 EllieD

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Posted 29 October 2019 - 08:24

I'm not sure there's anything in the definition of "vocation" that indicates someone with a vocation would be prepared to die in order to do it. A vocation is a job, a career, an occupation; something which the person feels very passionate about of course, but it nevertheless puts a bit of bread on the table and I don't think the definition mentions a requirement to die for it. 


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#22 zwhe

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Posted 29 October 2019 - 09:10

My local college offers vocational courses in things like hairdressing and plumbing - I doubt many of them would want to die for their choice of career!

I'm pretty sure the dictionary definition is a career that you enjoy or is well suited to your skills, although it is often used in religious organisations to mean something more (probably by congregations trying to justify calling the vicar at 3am for prayer because they have a toothache!).


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#23 ma non troppo

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Posted 29 October 2019 - 12:17

I'm frankly amazed at the number of people saying they would teach for virtually nothing and live in an old caravan - not only does this undermine our profession in the eyes of the general public, many of whom think we do it just for "pin money" or "in our spare time as a hobby" , but actually living in an old caravan has a lot of problems - most sites won't allow you to stay in them for several winter weeks over the year! We all have to eat.
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#24 mel2

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Posted 29 October 2019 - 15:43

I wouldn't do it for nothing now. I have done in the past, in order to gain experience.

That doesn't stop people thinking it is ok to pay late. I'm working on that one!

 

Now for the old business of being expected to use organ-playing skills for gratis -grrrr!  :angry:


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#25 jpiano

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Posted 29 October 2019 - 23:46

I'm frankly amazed at the number of people saying they would teach for virtually nothing and live in an old caravan - not only does this undermine our profession in the eyes of the general public, many of whom think we do it just for "pin money" or "in our spare time as a hobby" , but actually living in an old caravan has a lot of problems - most sites won't allow you to stay in them for several winter weeks over the year! We all have to eat.

totally agree- and fitting my 2 pianos onto said old caravan might prove a tiny bit of a problem...


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#26 ma non troppo

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Posted 29 October 2019 - 23:48

Show me the money, I say.
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#27 ma non troppo

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Posted 29 October 2019 - 23:52

 
Now for the old business of being expected to use organ-playing skills for gratis -grrrr!  :angry:


Well don't do it then!

Since I graduated from university (1990) I have played twice for free - once for the funeral of a good friend's mother and once for a funeral of a personal friend.

Ask around other professionals what they do for free for a guide. (Solicitors, doctors, vets, accountants).
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#28 mel2

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Posted 30 October 2019 - 07:00

Now for the old business of being expected to use organ-playing skills for gratis -grrrr!  :angry:


Well don't do it then!
Since I graduated from university (1990) I have played twice for free - once for the funeral of a good friend's mother and once for a funeral of a personal friend.
Ask around other professionals what they do for free for a guide. (Solicitors, doctors, vets, accountants).

I was half way through it when the retired priest declared that 'we don't charge for a baptism....'
So the expenses that the family agreed to pay didn't materialise.
I could have kicked up a stink and put a blight on the occasion but just resolved to decline future gigs.
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#29 Latin pianist

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Posted 30 October 2019 - 07:20

I've been told that the church doesn't charge for baptisms unlike weddings and funerals, but round here, the vicar does ask for an organist's fee. So the family should still have paid you.My general rule with services is that if I would have been there anyway eg funerals of friends, church members etc, I don't take a fee. I don't get paid for playing at my own Methodist church and that's fine because I attend anyway.
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#30 ma non troppo

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Posted 30 October 2019 - 23:44

It's outrageous! The Church should pay if they tell the clients it is free. Can you think of any other circumstance where this would not be the case? Presumably you were hired by the church?
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