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Out of interest

#sight #reading #sightreading

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#16 SingingPython

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Posted 24 February 2020 - 08:25

Invidia - have you tried making yourself memorise music as an alternative way to "make yourself learn it properly"?

I too would be happy having a go at the OP's example - very much under speed  :rofl:


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#17 Norway

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Posted 24 February 2020 - 08:56

:lol: Yeah - me too. Thing is, it's nice to let others shine and to feel good about themselves. This makes us the bigger people. So I'm going to leave John Ogdon and Co. to it!,


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#18 Latin pianist

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Posted 24 February 2020 - 09:30

I do a lot of accompanying and if faced with this, I could hash my way through it at speed with an instrumentalist by no means accurately and then I would have to practise it to achieve a good performance.
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#19 agricola

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Posted 24 February 2020 - 14:39

It strikes me as the sort of piece that would be much more approachable as a quick study than sight reading as it's so highly patterned.  The slow section in the middle looks OK!  Much harder than Grade 8, anyway. 

 

Comparing the levels of difficulty in the ABRSM quick studies for DipABRSM etc I find I can do the Dip level with no preparation and make it sound like a finished piece, LRSM level with no prep I can do pretty well but go off-piste occasionally but for the FRSM level I definitely need the 5 minutes prep time to make a decent attempt.  What slows me down the most is the eye-to-brain speed required to spot how many ledger lines I'm looking at, or which notes of a chord have accidentals.  Presumably this is the sort of thing that John Ogdon was super good at.  I seem to recall hearing that Arnold Bax was also an excellent sight reader and had the ability to 'spot' a large number of items at a glance -- the way most of us can do with 5 or 6 items.  (For higher numbers most people need to count them or sub-divide them into groups to be sure how many there are)


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#20 Ligneo Fistula

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Posted 24 February 2020 - 19:00

I believe Saint-Saens was a genius sight reader and played a Wagner opera from a full score having never seen it before.

 

Anyway, slightly different question: at what grade would you expect most learners to be able to sight read hymns (4-part ones typical of Hymns Ancient and Modern) (ignoring the ones for which the melody is known)?


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#21 elemimele

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Posted 24 February 2020 - 21:51

Hymns aren't as easy as they look. But from a practical perspective, that's a question that's hard to answer because it depends what you define as a successful sight-read. In an average village church of my youth, if you missed out the tenor part altogether, no one would much care. Practical sight-reading in the big outside world isn't about playing what's on the paper, it's about giving the audience no obvious reason to believe that they're not hearing what's on the paper.


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#22 EllieD

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Posted 25 February 2020 - 08:20

I tried sight reading hymns, but stumbled with having to work out which hand needed to play the tenor part - I needed time to think about that. Hymns are so different from exam sight reading tests. I can imagine someone pretty good at exam tests struggling a bit with hyms and vice versa. It's all down to what you practice I think.


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#23 agricola

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Posted 25 February 2020 - 13:03

To sight read hymns comfortably up to speed and with all the notes intact I would say you need to be around Grade 6, because you need to recognise chords rather than individual notes.  My piano teacher gave them to us for legato pedal practice studies after Grade 5.


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