Jump to content


Photo

Copies of scores for examiners

photocopying copyright examiners diploma

  • Please log in to reply
11 replies to this topic

#1 Bach95

Bach95

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 53 posts
  • Member: 887574
    Joined: 30-November 13

Posted 10 December 2013 - 14:56

Thought I'd start a new thread on this as I'm a little confused as to what's best.

 

I'll be presenting photocopies of my scores to the examiners in my DipABRSM recital (fret not, I have permission, and I know I have to write "for examiner's use - destroy afterwards" at the top).

 

As I'm photocopying them 10 days before my exam, they're covered in all my pencil marks. Is this a bad thing?

 

Also, how should I present them? Is it to ok present each piece as the sheets stapled together? I though about handing them up in plastic pockets in a folder, but then I realized they'll be keeping them, and extracting 30 or so sheets from folders at the end of the exam will just be tedious and cumbersome. 

 

Thanks :)


  • 0

#2 vee

vee

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 117 posts
  • Member: 452208
    Joined: 04-May 12
  • Edison, New Jersey

Posted 11 December 2013 - 08:23

I presented my copies in a folder - but then the examiner returned the folder and its contents to me at the end of the exam. In any case, it wasn't an expensive folder and I was quite prepared to let it go.

 

I would suggest you make some clean copies for the examiner and put them right away into a folder so that they don't get crushed.

 

Good luck!


  • 0

#3 Bach95

Bach95

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 53 posts
  • Member: 887574
    Joined: 30-November 13

Posted 11 December 2013 - 12:35

Yeah, I think I'll just present them in folders. As for the clean copies, erasing 30 pages worth of pencil marks just seems like too much work, especially for something that they don't specify. It's not like the syllabus says "copies of the scores must not be written on". The only thing my teacher ever said about pencil marks is that they would highlight areas I've had trouble with. As long as the scores are in standard notation and are legible, I'd say they wouldn't care. Anyway, the pencil marks will prove I've actually put in the work! :lol:


  • 0

#4 Deborah

Deborah

    Virtuoso

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 5861 posts
  • Member: 2747
    Joined: 16-December 04
  • Monsalvat, Valhalla

Posted 11 December 2013 - 12:59

As you seem to be worried about pencil marks in your score, is it possible to borrow copies from your teacher, a friend, the library, or even download the scores?


  • 0

#5 mrbouffant

mrbouffant

    Prodigy

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1825 posts
  • Member: 33716
    Joined: 26-June 08

Posted 11 December 2013 - 16:26

Do the marks say stuff like "watch out - fudge this bit!" ? If so, perhaps they are best removed...


  • 0

#6 Bach95

Bach95

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 53 posts
  • Member: 887574
    Joined: 30-November 13

Posted 15 December 2013 - 11:59

Well, they've been photocopied now and to be honest, the pencil marks weren't really anything to worry about. Mostly they're just highlighting notes or bars I was getting wrong, fingerings, dynamics and articulation. Also some friendly reminders from my teacher such as "Tempo!" and "Count!" :)


  • 0

#7 gco

gco

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts
  • Member: 887938
    Joined: 11-February 14

Posted 12 February 2014 - 11:59

I have done quite a bit of research on the (legal) use of photocopies for performance and examination over the past few years.

Until 2012, it was necessary to have permission from the publisher for a photocopy to be made, even if it was solely for the use of the examiner. The MPA (Music Publishers Association) has a Code of Fair Practice that lists specific situations in which it is permissible to make photocopies. This was, in my opinion, ambiguous when it came to making copies for examiners: copies made for the purpose of an examination [by someone setting the exam] were included, but interpretation varied between boards as to whether this included copies made by candidates for the use of the examiner. Accordingly, until recently the ABRSM followed the policy that candidates must obtain permission before making copies for the use of examiners. Given that, to the best of my knowledge, publishers always granted permission for this purpose, it seemed to me that the whole process was wasting the time both of the candidates and of the publishers. I brought this to the attention of the MPA, who accepted my point and undertook to review it with their members; and it is gratifying to see that the 2012 edition of the Code includes specific permission for candidates to makes copies for examiners provided that a copy of each piece is owned by the candidate, copies are appropriately marked up and copies are retained and destroyed by the examiners after use (see www.mpaonline.org.uk/sites/default/files/Code_of_Fair_Practice_1.pdf  "Permissions", item 10).

A long as your music is published by a member of the MPA (and it's very unlikely that it's not), this deals with the permission side of things. As far as pencil marks are concerned, that's up to you. Personally, I'd make sure that any copy is clean with the exception of anything you specifically want to include (e.g. if in your performance you intend to depart deliberately from what is printed it might be wise to annotate this so the examiners have in front of them what you actually intend to perform).

Presentation is, again, up to you. I copied everything onto double-sided A3 and presented a folded & stapled A4 booklet containing everything in performance order and a folder would also be absolutely fine (as long as you don't mind potentially losing it to the examiners). Although I don't believe the way in which you present the printed music is included in the marking criteria, it would be wise to ensure that what you provide and how you provide it is easy to use (e.g. use index tabs to locate pieces in larger printed publications, and make page turning easy for photocopies). I would say a staple in the top left hand corner would be just about ok, provided it's single sided (so the examiners don't have to turn copies round or over), but it's borderline and may seem slightly unprofessional given the context. Fundamentally, you want the examiners to concentrate on your performance and not to be distracted or irritated by trying to find or to follow the music you are performing!


  • 0

#8 RoseRodent

RoseRodent

    Virtuoso

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3003 posts
  • Member: 76503
    Joined: 29-September 09
  • Scotland

Posted 13 February 2014 - 09:25

As you seem to be worried about pencil marks in your score, is it possible to borrow copies from your teacher, a friend, the library, or even download the scores?

 

Watch out for that one, though, if you have a copy of the same item which is from a different publisher then you risk it being an illegal photocopy, as what you are copying is not what you own. You're better off with the pencil markings. Most pencil markings don't copy very well anyway, and examiners are used to ignoring them. It's just the intriguing ones they sometimes get into, I tend to have emotional markings in my scores and I sometimes have examiners (not ABRSM, generally) comment on why I have chosen to write "he doesn't love her any more" above that section! 


  • 0

#9 jessy

jessy

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 260 posts
  • Member: 90795
    Joined: 16-February 10

Posted 14 February 2014 - 16:54

I have always avoided leaving pencil marks, to the extent of copying it, rubbing out my marks, copying the score without pencil marks, then putting my pencil marks in again! I don't want anyone to see my fingerings etc in case I do something completely different!

Another issue is whether to give the full score or just the solo line.

Easiest all round, I've concluded, is to borrow a copy form someone else and give that to the examiner.

Saying that, having done 3 diploma exams altogether, I have always given a photocopy of the solo line only, only clipped together and not in any special folder.
  • 0

#10 sbhoa

sbhoa

    Maestro

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 22946 posts
  • Member: 24
    Joined: 31-October 03
  • Tameside

Posted 14 February 2014 - 17:20

I seem to remember reading that only the solo line was ok. That does seem rather odd to me.


  • 0

#11 helenflute

helenflute

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 74 posts
  • Member: 411387
    Joined: 25-February 12

Posted 15 February 2014 - 14:22

I've always brought in pristine/new originals of the complete score for the examiners:

 

Complete score because I wouldn't want them focusing on just the flute part. Additionally they may need to ask questions about the harmony etc - impossible to do/explain without the full score infront of them.

 

New/clean original scores because I think it creates a better impression. Professional, organised, focused... even before you tune your instrument. Yes - it's expensive, but it's a small investment when you consider the cost of the exams (my FRSM was over 1000 Euros). A way around this may be a library copy, or one borrowed from a friend/tutor. I personally prefer not to use photocopies.


  • 0

#12 Bach95

Bach95

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 53 posts
  • Member: 887574
    Joined: 30-November 13

Posted 15 February 2014 - 19:20

Well, when I went in I gave them four photocopies and one original. I gave them the original for the 5th piece because i was using a photocopy to avoid an impossible page turn. I told them at the start that I had permission from everyone (which I did) and they thanked me for sorting that out. The photocopies I gave them were all covered in pencil marks, but they didn't mention anything about that :)


  • 0





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: photocopying, copyright, examiners, diploma