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A thread for little critters


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#31 Aquarelle

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Posted 19 September 2019 - 20:36

Nice name  Norway but she isn't a dove. She's a wood pigeon! 


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#32 Hedgehog

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Posted 19 September 2019 - 21:08

We have several piebald pigeons in our garden. I think they may be living under the solar panels on the roof. They are partly the same colour as the local wood pigeons, some of whom nest in our ancient wisteria, and partly pure white, so when they descend from the roof you have a momentary picture of pure white wings and tail feathers coming down and when they land they have the grey pigeon-colour round the head and upper body section.

Very strange - we haven't seen anything like it before. They seem rather more nervous than the average pigeon and are slightly smaller - a bit more dove size.


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#33 LoneM

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Posted 19 September 2019 - 21:27

Nice name  Norway but she isn't a dove. She's a wood pigeon! 

 

Where I grew up in the north of Scotland we called them cushie-doos, or just cushies for short.  I know you are in France but think of the Auld Alliance...


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#34 Aquarelle

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Posted 19 September 2019 - 21:48

So perhaps I should call her "Cushie". she is certainly having a much cushier time than she was when I found her!  

 

Hedgehog we saw the same mixture with some pigeons in London and also here. At the end of our road is a lady who keeps white fantail pigeons.  They are often allowed to fly freely.The  grey feral pigeons that live around the maize stocks of the agricultural co-operative nearby show signs of interbreeding.


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#35 Hedgehog

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Posted 20 September 2019 - 08:45

So perhaps I should call her "Cushie". she is certainly having a much cushier time than she was when I found her!  

 

Hedgehog we saw the same mixture with some pigeons in London and also here. At the end of our road is a lady who keeps white fantail pigeons.  They are often allowed to fly freely.The  grey feral pigeons that live around the maize stocks of the agricultural co-operative nearby show signs of interbreeding.

That must explain it then. They certainly look like "crosses". Husband is wondering whether they will breed next year!! It will be interesting to see, although they seem to have gone away at the moment.


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#36 Aquarelle

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Posted 20 September 2019 - 09:28

Posted Today, 10:25

Cushie got some pigeon sized maize, some smaller seeds (garden bird variety)and some apple for breakfast - but she isn't eating of her own accord and I have to hand feed her. She drinks a lot. I have the feeling that she has no idea why she is being kept in a cage, is quite convinced she can fly and thinks I am keeping her in prison.

 

However, back in England we once had a poisoned  wood pigeon that took 6 months to recover and never ate by himself. He also spent most of his time with his back to us and we called him "Tourne-dos". We released him one weekend at our caravan on a farm near Princes Risborough.  We went back for another weekend several weeks later and he actually came back to the caravan to see us!  So I think in that case the penny dropped that we were actually friends and helpers and not prison warders. Cushie will just have to eat up and grow feathers if she wants a second chance. 


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#37 Norway

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Posted 23 September 2019 - 07:59

Dozy Hen likes tinned sweetcorn and makes excited appreciative noises when she sees it coming! Do you think Cushie might like this too?


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#38 Aquarelle

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Posted 23 September 2019 - 10:08

Thanks Norway, I could try that; However, I looked out of the kitchen window yesterday and saw Cushie pecking away. I went out later and - guess what - - no corn left in the cage! So I think she has ended her hunger strike. I will be keeping her under observation. I will have to take her out of her cage at least every other day and take her indoors so that she can at least flap her wings a bit. Otherwise her muscles will atrophy. Her feathers are looking a bit better but it is going to be a long job.

 

I am now off to the cat thread to relate a tale of two kitties.


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#39 Aquarelle

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Posted 24 October 2019 - 16:26

Well, Cushie is still with us but her feathers are improving and I have found some calcium supplement to help. But I now have another bird - a turtle dove -the second this year. I found it in the garden unable to move and with one of my cats (Grey Puss - remember him?) lying  maliciously about a metre away. However he didn't attempt to approach the bird and I was able to pick it up.Once inside I found a head injury that looked fairly superficial and one injured eye. However the worst thing was that the bird couldn't hold its head up. I've seen this before - when we used to rescue pigeons in London. The neck was not broken and there was no paralysis.

 

Being now rather short of places to put all these animals that have to be in isolation, this one is now in the upstairs bathroom. The eye is a little more open and she can now hold her head up most of the time. She can also grasp the perch in her cage, which she couldn't do at first.. However as always with turtle doves, it's a hand feeding job.

 

Now for the really tiny critters. At the moment, whenever I open my outside dustbins there are  always one or two tiny snails clinging to the inside. Some have been so young they were still transparent. Obviously they wouldn't survive in the dustbin. I have been concerned about the decrease in the snail population in our garden over the past three years. So I now have a snail nursery. I also have a snail hospital in another box where a large snail I accidentally trod on is recuperating and repairing his shell. I am beginning to feel like Mrs Noah! But then I have always adored Benjamin Britten's "Noyes Fludde."  When I was at College of Education we main music students provided the recorder players for a performance by some nearby junior schools in a church in Kingston. I also took along some children from the junior choir of the Methodist church,  of which at the time I was choir mistress. They loved it though one little girl I distinctly remember was disappointed because there was no interval and therefore no ice cream!


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#40 Aquarelle

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Posted 01 November 2019 - 10:03

The occupants of the snail nursery are now more numerous and the latest was the smallest ever and still had what looked like the remains of the egg skin clinging to it. I had to use a paint brush to pick it up. How it got into the dustbin I simply cannot imagine. The middle sized snails are doing well and the one that is mending its shell is also improving; I've got each "group" in a one litre ice cream tub with a perforated lid. I clean them out every 2 or 3 days - being careful to count the tiny ones.


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#41 Norway

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Posted 01 November 2019 - 12:42

@ Aquarelle. Did you ever consider being a conservationist? I do similar things and probably should have been one!


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#42 Aquarelle

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Posted 01 November 2019 - 14:36

I suppose I am one in a very small way!


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#43 mel2

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Posted 01 November 2019 - 15:20

@ Aquarelle. Did you ever consider being a conservationist? I do similar things and probably should have been one!


Is a conservationist something that you decide to 'be'; as though it has a capital C?

It's nice to know that anything (even snails!) that flaps, creeps or scuttles into Aquarelle's territory finds a safe haven.

I draw the line at anything that slithers (especially if it attacks my beans!) but will be as kind as possible to anything sharing my space. I sort of assumed I was typical. Do I need to belong to an association?
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#44 jim palmer

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Posted 01 November 2019 - 16:41

It's surprising what little critters are hiding in the wilderness garden at the back of our block!

I put out some chopped-up pitta bread and within a few mins a little critter had ventured to snatch a piece and scuttle off.

It has all gone now.


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#45 Norway

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Posted 02 November 2019 - 16:10

I bet it's magpies - mine eat all my leftover scraps in no time - they're very useful!


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