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Brexit - your vote and why?


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#661 dorfmouse

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 18:43

'You're going next week, isn't it! '

That should be 'innit', innit?!

edit - lost my be ....
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#662 Aquarelle

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 20:05

In other words, as long as you can decline the auxiliary  verbs to be, to have and to do and you know the present and past participles of any other verb you want to use, it's relatively easy - no er, ir, re, oir  verbs to learn to decline as in French.

 

I'm not saying the use of tenses is easy - it probably isn't because many languages express the concept of different times and  the way time passes in different ways. But the actual format in English is relatively simple.

 

Anyway, I can't see the Brexit making any difference to the use of English as an international language. It might get increasingly dissociated from the UK as such - which in many instances is already the case as lots of people don't learn British English but rather American English  or some other variant. English is a very flexible means of communication.

 

 

 


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#663 linda.ff

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Posted 14 September 2017 - 10:55

I'm not saying the use of tenses is easy - it probably isn't because many languages express the concept of different times and  the way time passes in different ways. But the actual format in English is relatively simple.

 

 

 

That sounds like a Chinese adult I used to teach "why you need tenses? We don't need tenses in Chinese. I play piano yesterday, I play piano today, I play piano tomorrow. Sorted" biggrin.png

 

But to express a plural (I think it was)  is far more complicated in her language, she admitted.


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#664 Kai-Lei

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Posted 14 September 2017 - 11:26

^^^ Almost the Same in Japanese. Two tenses - past, present. Problem is they treat adjectives like verbs - past, present, affirmative, negative. Probably because they don't have the verb "to be" so "is" is assumed. Desu sometimes counts as "is" ??

 

 

I voted Brexit. I used to be a firm fan of the EU, once even hoped we'd join the Euro. But over the past decade I've seen what it's become. I look at what's actually happening in the EU now, not at what should be happening. Like all glossy brochures, the EU's one doesn't tell the entire truth. Druncker's State of the Union speech has put the frighteners on quite a few people/leaders.


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#665 elemimele

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Posted 14 September 2017 - 15:29

I honestly don't believe that English verbs are particularly easy - they're just different. As native speakers, we don't notice how weird they can be: "I was just about to go"; we build our verb tenses out of prepositions, random particles, words that have nothing whatsoever to do with a verb, rather than putting endings on, and we take it for granted that endings are a complexity to learn, while not noticing the complexity of knowing how to assemble, illogically, the correct tense out of a massive assortment of plug-in bits and pieces. In what way was I "just", and in what way was I going "about"?? "The car was just about going" uses the same two "extra" words in a very similar sentence and yet means something completely different.

 

The reason that English remains simple-to-use despite this way of forming verbs is precisely that given by linda.ff's Chinese friend: nearly always in real life applications, the exact tense (a) doesn't matter, and (b) can be deduced from context.

Not many 2nd-language speakers bother with formations like "Had you come round at the time Charles said you were going to, I would have been just about to go down the shops,"

 

But Yes, Brexit has nothing to do with English as a useful general-purpose common language. I didn't vote Brexit but looking at Juncker's latest idea for abandoning national vetoes on taxation, I can't really support his approach to Europe. No politician will, in any case, surrender control over taxes, because taxes make or break elections.


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#666 Aeolienne

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Posted 26 September 2019 - 14:24

My father has discovered that he is entitled to apply for an Italian passport, as his grandfather was born in Naples. There's just the small matter of tracking down an 1860s birth certificate at the Neapolitan public records office.

I'm not eligible to apply, not that I have much affection for Naples ever since being harrassed on a school trip there. Besides which, our Italian ancestry is originally Piemontese, my great-great-great-grandfather having come to the UK in 1821 as a political refugee. I'm told that there is a street named after him in some small town in Piedmont. Umberto Eco wrote (in Foucault's Pendulum) that "any good Piedmontese had the ability to listen politely, look you in the eye, and say 'You think so?' in a tone of such apparent sincerity that you immediately felt his profound disapproval." I'll leave you to judge whether I've inherited that trait. ;)


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#667 Tortellini

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Posted 27 September 2019 - 17:36

 

 

I'm told that there is a street named after him in some small town in Piedmont.

 

Have you tried looking it up on Google maps? I have applied for Italian citizenship and, tocchiamo il ferro, should have it in about two years' time. :lol:  :lol:


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#668 Aeolienne

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Posted 04 October 2019 - 16:07

 

 

 

I'm told that there is a street named after him in some small town in Piedmont.

 

Have you tried looking it up on Google maps? I have applied for Italian citizenship and, tocchiamo il ferro, should have it in about two years' time. :lol:  :lol:

 

So Italians touch iron for luck rather than wood? Interessante!


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#669 Gordon Shumway

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Posted 04 October 2019 - 17:14

Originally (I came across it recently in a Latin text), it seems that one touched the table for luck, as the table was sacred.

So wood is understandable. Iron less so. Something to do with horseshoes, Google says, but why are horseshoes lucky? Because they are iron, lol. There's a theory that when iron was only recently invented, it was what gave rise to the myth of adamant. If the origin of iron's warding off evil goes back that far, it seems to have skipped a few millennia before transferring its magic to horseshoes!


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#670 dorfmouse

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Posted 06 October 2019 - 20:04

The "... filthy toe rag" lady made my day!
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#671 Dr. Rogers

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Posted 07 October 2019 - 13:54

When I was a young child, my father was adamant that there be a horseshoe hung over my nursery/bedroom door.  Apparently that prevents the not-so-good Neighbors (the Unseelie Court) from stealing a human baby and leaving a changeling in its place.  My father didn't believe in anything supernatural, but the old traditions die hard.  (He inherited many Irish traditions from his mother.  His father was a Cherokee ani yvwi.)


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#672 corenfa

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Posted 07 October 2019 - 14:32

When I was a young child, my father was adamant that there be a horseshoe hung over my nursery/bedroom door. Apparently that prevents the not-so-good Neighbors (the Unseelie Court) from stealing a human baby and leaving a changeling in its place. My father didn't believe in anything supernatural, but the old traditions die hard. (He inherited many Irish traditions from his mother. His father was a Cherokee ani yvwi.)


My parents never did that so maybe I'm a changeling. It might explain a lot...
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#673 Tortellini

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Posted 12 October 2019 - 10:54

 

 

 

 

I'm told that there is a street named after him in some small town in Piedmont.

 

Have you tried looking it up on Google maps? I have applied for Italian citizenship and, tocchiamo il ferro, should have it in about two years' time. :lol:  :lol:

 

So Italians touch iron for luck rather than wood? Interessante!

 

The men also like to, ahem, touch themselves! In one class I held we were reading an article about preparing for your own death and about half the men had a quick squeeze to ward off any bad vibes.  :rofl:  :rofl:


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#674 Gordon Shumway

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Posted 14 October 2019 - 15:12

The men also like to, ahem, touch themselves! In one class I held we were reading an article about preparing for your own death and about half the men had a quick squeeze to ward off any bad vibes.  :rofl:  :rofl:

 

 

Somewhere there's a Youtube video of a standup comic talking about that, but it's probably not suitable for this forum.


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#675 Tortellini

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Posted 28 October 2019 - 14:52

AAARGH! Just listening to the podcast of The Archers and "they" can obviously tell that I am in Italy as there was a lovely "Get Ready for Brexit" message preceding it telling to find out how I can "continue living in this country and stay in your job".  :angry:  :angry:  :angry:  I get that they want to provide information (although obviously it's a completely useless message!) but how tone deaf? Just casually suggesting that if I don't do the right thing I will no longer be able to stay in my job (which I've had for twenty years), live in my own home that I bought, stay with my family....


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