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Who's Doing Summer Exams?


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#61 Scaredycat

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Posted 27 June 2019 - 07:30

Well it wasn't pretty, as my hands shook so much, but I got through it. Says something when the aural was, I think, the best part. Now to wait for the result and to find some fun stuff to play and consolidate before thinking of G2.
How's everyone else getting on?
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#62 ABN

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Posted 27 June 2019 - 09:10

Sure you'll be fine scaredycat, we are our own worst critics and tend to dwell on what we see as the bad bits and subsequently overlook the good bits.
I remember all my mistakes from last year when I took my grade 2, I convinced myself it had gone horribly wrong but when the results were announced I was pleasantly surprised as I'm sure you will be when you collect your certificate.
Well done for battling through your nerves, onward and upward :)
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#63 ABN

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Posted 27 June 2019 - 09:15

I did a mock exam (grade 3 piano) with my teacher yesterday and for some reason I felt quite tense and nervous, I don't usually suffer too much with nerves, subsequently this reflected in my playing, overall score was 119 which considering how I felt it went was quite a surprise
Now to try and beat that score in the real exam next week
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#64 hennylemon

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Posted 27 June 2019 - 12:23

I did a mock exam (grade 3 piano) with my teacher yesterday and for some reason I felt quite tense and nervous, I don't usually suffer too much with nerves, subsequently this reflected in my playing, overall score was 119 which considering how I felt it went was quite a surprise
Now to try and beat that score in the real exam next week

 

Doing a mock exam with your teacher is a very constructive preparation technique - especially to get used to playing with nerves. I know this is a bit a silly thing and it really might not translate to anyone else, but one way I manage my nerves on the day is just saying 'hello' and welcome the nervy sensations like an old friend. I can't fight them, so I try to make the jitters seem less intimidating.


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#65 ABN

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Posted 28 June 2019 - 09:08


I did a mock exam (grade 3 piano) with my teacher yesterday and for some reason I felt quite tense and nervous, I don't usually suffer too much with nerves, subsequently this reflected in my playing, overall score was 119 which considering how I felt it went was quite a surprise
Now to try and beat that score in the real exam next week

Doing a mock exam with your teacher is a very constructive preparation technique - especially to get used to playing with nerves. I know this is a bit a silly thing and it really might not translate to anyone else, but one way I manage my nerves on the day is just saying 'hello' and welcome the nervy sensations like an old friend. I can't fight them, so I try to make the jitters seem less intimidating.
I agree, it's better to face our nerves head on and try to work with them rather than trying to ignore them, I think the only way to get comfortable in performance type scenarios is to keep on facing this type of thing and eventually we can become conditioned to playing with a bit of stage fright and not freeze at the first 'wrong note' etc. of course it's easier said than done but to keep on trying to play outside our comfort zone will only make it easier as time goes on, atleast that's what I keep telling myself,
also I've come to terms with myself that the few minutes I spend playing during my exam is only a snippet of a much larger picture and if all goes to pieces then it's not the end of the world, no one is going to confiscate my instrument and I will still enjoy playing and learning as much as I have been which in a way also helps to calm exam nerves, although I will be trying my very best as I really, really want to pass with a good score :)
Counting down the days now, this time next week it will all be over
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#66 hennylemon

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Posted 28 June 2019 - 10:49

 

 

I did a mock exam (grade 3 piano) with my teacher yesterday and for some reason I felt quite tense and nervous, I don't usually suffer too much with nerves, subsequently this reflected in my playing, overall score was 119 which considering how I felt it went was quite a surprise
Now to try and beat that score in the real exam next week

Doing a mock exam with your teacher is a very constructive preparation technique - especially to get used to playing with nerves. I know this is a bit a silly thing and it really might not translate to anyone else, but one way I manage my nerves on the day is just saying 'hello' and welcome the nervy sensations like an old friend. I can't fight them, so I try to make the jitters seem less intimidating.
I agree, it's better to face our nerves head on and try to work with them rather than trying to ignore them, I think the only way to get comfortable in performance type scenarios is to keep on facing this type of thing and eventually we can become conditioned to playing with a bit of stage fright and not freeze at the first 'wrong note' etc. of course it's easier said than done but to keep on trying to play outside our comfort zone will only make it easier as time goes on, atleast that's what I keep telling myself,
also I've come to terms with myself that the few minutes I spend playing during my exam is only a snippet of a much larger picture and if all goes to pieces then it's not the end of the world, no one is going to confiscate my instrument and I will still enjoy playing and learning as much as I have been which in a way also helps to calm exam nerves, although I will be trying my very best as I really, really want to pass with a good score smile.png
Counting down the days now, this time next week it will all be over

 

 

Your approach sounds very healthy. I'm sure you'll be great. :) 


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#67 corenfa

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Posted 28 June 2019 - 14:48

Exactly one calendar month to ATCL. Have recorded myself a few times and the main impression is "not as bad as I thought". I have a few run throughs coming up so that should shake out a lot of things.
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#68 ABN

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Posted 28 June 2019 - 15:07

Exactly one calendar month to ATCL. Have recorded myself a few times and the main impression is "not as bad as I thought". I have a few run throughs coming up so that should shake out a lot of things.

Just read online what ATCL involves, that's a lot of work, very best of luck to you. Look forward to hearing how you get on :)


If you don't mind me asking how long has it taken you to prepare ?
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#69 corenfa

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Posted 29 June 2019 - 12:21

 

Exactly one calendar month to ATCL. Have recorded myself a few times and the main impression is "not as bad as I thought". I have a few run throughs coming up so that should shake out a lot of things.

Just read online what ATCL involves, that's a lot of work, very best of luck to you. Look forward to hearing how you get on smile.png


If you don't mind me asking how long has it taken you to prepare ?

 

I don't mind but the answer is a bit vague :)

 

I started off 6 years ago when I was very hacked off with work, and decided I wanted to learn to play the piano properly, so presented my teacher with a LTCL (that's the next diploma up) programme that I couldn't play, but wanted to work on. She looked at me with consternation and said it would take a couple of years. Fast forward a couple of years and I could play everything on the LTCL programme except one piece but I was bored with practising the others, so decided I would do the ATCL programme while getting that last piece (Chopin Polonaise Op. 53) up to scratch. I spent maybe a year working on the ATCL programme, then another six months being too stressed at work, then another six months out of the country visiting family with no practising (though I did manage to get some playing in). I came back in March and decided to do the exam at the end of July.

 

So, I have no idea how long it has taken me to prepare... I sort of started in 2013, but I had so many twists and turns and breaks in the meantime that my answer is not really accurate and I highly do not recommend following the path I took. 


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#70 saxStef

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Posted 29 June 2019 - 14:18

There it went... sight reading was not as scary as I feared. I believe the exercises from the official book are intentionally far more difficult.

I can't tell about the aural: I'll just wait for the feedback with the result. At least I didn't panic right there...

 

I feel a bit disappointed about the practical part. When in the warm up room, I found out that I couldn't play high F. Perhaps the reed had turned bad, or something happened because of the unusually high temperature. That note comes up a couple of times in my pieces.This made me quite nervous and I believe it affected my performance. A lesson on how to prepare for unexpected things to happen.

 

Note for the next exam: have at least three reeds that are good for performance, and change reed as soon as I suspect that something is going wrong.


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#71 Ligneo Fistula

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Posted 29 June 2019 - 15:45

Oh well. Nerves/adrenaline got the better of me and I played all my pieces at rushed tempi.  Some glaring howlers dotted throughout, but on balance better than I feared it could have turned out.  I'm sure the examiner was kind and gave me the easiest sight-reading exercise – I agree with saxStef about the practice material.

 

I now plan to take a year out from piano exams and aim to play many more pieces at the same level to really solidify my skills. But I particularly want to improve my sight reading and aural.

 

As ever, the very best of luck to all those taking exams this session!


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#72 gav_1988

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Posted 01 July 2019 - 01:39

There it went... sight reading was not as scary as I feared. I believe the exercises from the official book are intentionally far more difficult.

I can't tell about the aural: I'll just wait for the feedback with the result. At least I didn't panic right there...

 

I feel a bit disappointed about the practical part. When in the warm up room, I found out that I couldn't play high F. Perhaps the reed had turned bad, or something happened because of the unusually high temperature. That note comes up a couple of times in my pieces.This made me quite nervous and I believe it affected my performance. A lesson on how to prepare for unexpected things to happen.

 

Note for the next exam: have at least three reeds that are good for performance, and change reed as soon as I suspect that something is going wrong.

 

Fingers crossed Stef! Sorry to hear your reed decided to go rogue! Nothing worse than finally finding a reed you can rely on for it to give up on you when it matters! 
 

I also suspect that they make the practice sight reading tests harder than the real thing.

Seems like it went decently. All the best. 


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#73 gav_1988

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Posted 01 July 2019 - 01:41

Oh well. Nerves/adrenaline got the better of me and I played all my pieces at rushed tempi.  Some glaring howlers dotted throughout, but on balance better than I feared it could have turned out.  I'm sure the examiner was kind and gave me the easiest sight-reading exercise – I agree with saxStef about the practice material.

 

I now plan to take a year out from piano exams and aim to play many more pieces at the same level to really solidify my skills. But I particularly want to improve my sight reading and aural.

 

As ever, the very best of luck to all those taking exams this session!

Fingers crossed that you get what you want, LF! Sounds like there was some positives in there!


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#74 Ligneo Fistula

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Posted 01 July 2019 - 18:45

Thanks gav.


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#75 Dr. Rogers

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Posted 01 July 2019 - 18:47

Good luck to those awaiting results, and here's hoping they'll be higher than you think!


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