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Broken chords

Are they useful?

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#1 Juan Carlos

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Posted 23 September 2019 - 09:08

I was just wondering why it is that broken chords are dropped at a certain stage and whether it wouldn't be useful to continue practising them into the upper grades.

Does anybody think this would be a good idea? If so, what pattern do you think would it be best to practise?

Thank you!


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#2 mel2

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Posted 23 September 2019 - 11:09

I'm using them as finger warm-ups for an adult who has hand flexibility issues; anything with moderate stretches. They have logical patterns too and get people thinking about chord inversions.


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#3 elemimele

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Posted 23 September 2019 - 16:46

Definitely useful. You can pick them up cheap at car boot sales, and provided they're not too badly broken, you can fix them and sell them on e-bay to barber-shop groups and the left hand of accordion players.


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#4 zwhe

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Posted 23 September 2019 - 16:57

Definitely useful. You can pick them up cheap at car boot sales, and provided they're not too badly broken, you can fix them and sell them on e-bay to barber-shop groups and the left hand of accordion players.

?? You can buy broken chords?!


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#5 zwhe

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Posted 23 September 2019 - 16:58

You used to have to do them beyond grade 1, and 4-note ones too. They're very useful if you plan on playing a lot of Beethoven!


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#6 EllieD

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Posted 23 September 2019 - 17:33

Definitely useful. You can pick them up cheap at car boot sales, and provided they're not too badly broken, you can fix them and sell them on e-bay to barber-shop groups and the left hand of accordion players.

 

:lol: 


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#7 Latin pianist

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Posted 23 September 2019 - 21:11

You still have to do them for grade 2. Not so long ago you had to do 2 different forms for grade 4, I think it was. That really seemed too easy and you don't do any for grade 4 now.
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#8 Aquarelle

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Posted 24 September 2019 - 13:04

I can only say that however useful they may be they are not useful to the average Grade 2 player - well, certainly not any of mine.  After we have battled with scales hands together for the first time, new keys and two octave arpeggios also for the first time, I turn the page in the scale book and present them with  what they see as four more lines to learn and that is really too much. OK, I know the fingering pattern is the same for both examples  but that is the point when most of mine say that G2 is much too difficult.

 

Do  broken chords in any form to your heart's content but let's get them out of the G2 syllabus. Actually i don't really want to see them in any exam syllabus. Arpeggios in their root  form, with inversions at later grades,  are quite enough.   :hides:


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#9 jpiano

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Posted 24 September 2019 - 22:38

I agree, Aquarelle. It's telling that for pupils not taking exams (which is around 50% for my teaching practice) I introduce broken chords almost exclusively through pieces. I really dislike and find excessive the learning of patterns for grade 1. Then the sudden switch to 4 notes for grade 2. I'd far rather have some 1 octave arpeggios (and if I recall correctly, the broken chords have been taken out of the proposed new scales syllabus). I agree with others about the importance of learning about chords and inversions, but there is already more than enough content in the grade exams for pianists.


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#10 Juan Carlos

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Posted 25 September 2019 - 09:30

Got the point. Thanks everybody


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#11 adultpianist

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Posted 19 October 2019 - 23:39

I like doing scales but I always thought broken chords were so boring


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