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#1 adultpianist

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Posted 28 June 2020 - 17:49

Where appropriate, I use the foot pedal and can use it well.   On my piano I have three foot pedals and the only one I have ever used is the right one.   

 

I know how to pedal and it is never an issue but when do I use the other pedals?   I do not play pieces higher than Grade 4 so are the other pedals for more complicated pieces? 


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#2 Ligneo Fistula

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Posted 28 June 2020 - 20:44

A YouTube video introducing the three piano pedals (with post-edit corrections): https://www.youtube....h?v=xwYBBWFDZRA or jump to 2:15 to skip the part about the damper pedal, which you already know everything about: https://youtu.be/xwYBBWFDZRA?t=134
 

Another (better) video on the 'other two' pedals, gives examples on how to apply the pedals in real music: https://www.youtube....h?v=GwHCZ0M4ljs

Wikipedia page giving more information about piano pedals: https://en.wikipedia...ki/Piano_pedals
 
I'll leave it to the teachers here to correct me, but the only early grade ABRSM piece that I've come across, in my extremely limited experience, needing either the una corda or sostenuto pedal is a grade 4 piece in the Encore book 2 (Baa Baa Blue Sheep's Waltz by Terence Greaves).


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#3 corenfa

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Posted 28 June 2020 - 20:49

The left-most (una corda) pedal can also be used to generate changes in tone colour, it isn't just for volume. I have been to recitals where the performer used the una corda but played at actually quite a high volume, and it was done just to change the tone colour. Teacher also told me that in certain performance situations, it could be used as an "emergency brake" to reduce the volume of the whole piece, for example performing on a very loud piano with a soloist who might be easily drowned out. 

 

The sostenuto (middle) pedal is not always present on upright pianos- some uprights have 3 pedals but the middle one is a practise pedal that activates a muffling mechanism. The sostenuto, if it is there, allows the player to depress one note and have just that one note sustained. I have no idea how it works, and have only used it once. 


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#4 adultpianist

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Posted 28 June 2020 - 23:08

Thanks very helpful


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#5 Invidia

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Posted 29 June 2020 - 11:57

The middle pedal is a recent invention (mid-19th century) that was initially more popular in the US (Steinway) than in Europe. So whether a composer used it depended on their location/the piano they owned. 


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