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What does this mean?


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#1 hammer action

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Posted 24 June 2020 - 09:49

Pardon my ignorance and inability to attach a screenshot of what I'm referring to, but I can't find anything online to tell me what two thin diagonal lines that take up a whole bar mean.  This seems to be a frequent feature in a book of orchestral excerpts I'm looking at right now.

 

I'll attach a screenshot if someone can tell me how to do it.

 

Thanks in advance.

 

Edit - Maybe represents a break in the piece of several bars?

 

Here's a screenshot link - https://docs.google....dit?usp=sharing


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#2 BadStrad

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Posted 24 June 2020 - 09:57

You need to store the image somewhere on the web. Photobox used to be used alot when I first joined the forum. But instagram or whatever people use these days would do. Then you add the url (the address) of the photo to your post.
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#3 Maizie

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Posted 24 June 2020 - 10:17

Does it look like a caesura? https://en.wikipedia..._symbols#Breaks

I have no experience with orchestral excerpts, but I'm wondering if it's a "break of indeterminate length", i.e. a bit where the rest of the orchestra is playing but your instrument is not, and it indicates you don't need to count the bars/stop for the 'right' length of time when playing an orchestral excerpt?  Complete guess though :D


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#4 hammer action

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Posted 24 June 2020 - 10:27

Nope, definitely not a caesura but thanks anyway!


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#5 JimD

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Posted 24 June 2020 - 10:30

Could it be a 'repeat the last bar' sign? They have dots either side of the lines though, which you didn't mention.

 

Very common in orchestra parts, and on the page linked above as 'Simile marks'.


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#6 vron

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Posted 24 June 2020 - 10:38

yes sound like the simile  mark ie play the bar before again exactly he same. It is found in our band pieces quite a lot.


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#7 hammer action

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Posted 24 June 2020 - 10:44

I hope this link works.  You can see the symbols at the end of the second and fourth line - https://docs.google....dit?usp=sharing


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#8 zwhe

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Posted 24 June 2020 - 11:15

It just means there are some bits missing - as its excerpts, they don't include everything.


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#9 hammer action

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Posted 24 June 2020 - 11:21

It just means there are some bits missing - as its excerpts, they don't include everything.

 

Thank you!


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#10 Hildegard

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Posted 24 June 2020 - 11:22

It just means there are some bits missing - as its excerpts, they don't include everything.

Yes, you can tell from the bar nunbers, which leap from 31 at the start of stave 2 to 81 at the start of stave 3. So, some 46 bars missing (in which the clarinets are silent). These days, it would be more usual to use a multi-bar rest with the number of silent bars (46?) printed as a numeral above the rest.


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#11 vron

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Posted 24 June 2020 - 11:28

ah yes. see it now with the excerpt. . different completely. Just shows missing bars.


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#12 zwhe

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Posted 24 June 2020 - 12:50

Its not necessarily rests, just bits they don't think you need to practise - they usually only include solos and difficult passages. My flute ones have a break in the stave rather than give the lines a bar!


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#13 Hildegard

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Posted 24 June 2020 - 12:54

Its not necessarily rests, just bits they don't think you need to practise - they usually only include solos and difficult passages. My flute ones have a break in the stave rather than give the lines a bar!

 

Could be, although I've never seen a book of excerpts include the 2nd (clarinet) part as well as the first. It looks to me more like an orchestral part for two clarinets.


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#14 Kai-Lei

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Posted Yesterday, 22:18

Could be, although I've never seen a book of excerpts include the 2nd (clarinet) part as well as the first. It looks to me more like an orchestral part for two clarinets.

Agreed. It looks like a German orchestral part - "Satz" (movement, in this case). which would make the 1 in B, 2 in B, Bflat clarinets or some other transposing instrument written a tone above concert pitch. B is often treated as Bflat in the B.A.C.H formula.

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