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2nd Instrument Help


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#1 hudson1984

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Posted 22 May 2020 - 13:21

Hi all, 

 

so since the arrival of our new buddle of j....NOISE! :) i've not been able to practice much piano - i.e. none! 

 

my piano is below his nursery and when he's awake i'm of course busy, when he's asleep I don't want to wake him. 

 

I also of course can't have lessons at the moment as we're all distancing. 

 

So, I'd like to add something else I could ideally teach myself, something pretty basic that perhaps travels easier than a piano! 

 

I am considering getting a digital piano as I can put it in the garage (insulated) but even then, I'd quite like something I could tinker with. 

 

I was thinking tin whistle and learn some folk type pieces. I don't think i'd wake anyone if I played in the garage, and it looks a simple enough instrument (of course I'm not saying it's an easy instrument but clearly less hurdles than a violin) 

 

I had thought possibly Harmonica, but it's not really sitting high on the list. 

Ukelele is a bit too cool for me

Guitar, tried before and think I'd be better with a teacher rather than self teaching. And being a lefty made it tricky too! 

 

Any other suggestions? My wife and I are fond of hiking and getting outdoors and I quite like the idea of sitting by the fire with a tin whistle. 


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#2 dorfmouse

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Posted 22 May 2020 - 14:13

Firstly, congratulations!
Secondly, have you actually tried playing while the bundle sleeps? I had twins and nothing much external would wake them when they were asleep! But I didn't play much for several years as they + work took up all my time and energy.
Tin whistle is pretty loud and quite piercing. The low whistles are lovely but the reach can be difficult.
Now a wee lap harp ... !
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#3 AdLibitum

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Posted 22 May 2020 - 14:27

A recorder! Have a look at the Recorder Thread in the Woodwind section. And look up Kristine West on Youtube.
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#4 SingingPython

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Posted 22 May 2020 - 15:39

I'm inclined to agree with both the above suggestions!  Recorder is great for a portable yet satisfying instrument.  But you will make life much easier for yourself if you let the baby become accustomed to piano music being part of the background of normal life.  How much piano was being played before they were born?  Music is great for "sleep cues" for little ones.

 

Oh and congratulations :)


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#5 Norway

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Posted 22 May 2020 - 17:10

Another vote for the recorder - great for teaching yourself, can be done for fun or seriously, and is portable and waterproof for those hiking trips!


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#6 The Cat

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Posted 22 May 2020 - 17:25

Definitely another vote here for recorder. They are cheap to buy and don't take too long to master. I taught myself to play Treble recorder a little while ago and really enjoyed it.
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#7 zwhe

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Posted 22 May 2020 - 18:25

My kids weren't disturbed by me drilling in their bedroom! How about a digital piano and headphones so you don't make any sound at all?


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#8 Tenor Viol

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Posted 22 May 2020 - 19:12

Saxophone...


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#9 elemimele

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Posted 22 May 2020 - 21:52

Another vote for recorder. In fact I found mine while I was trailing round junk-shops with a toddler in a push-chair. You can take a recorder anywhere, wash it when it gets dirty, it's not damaged by the rain (plastic ones I mean; you can also spend a lot on a gorgeous wooden one if you like, but the thing about recorders is that cheapish plastic ones from Yamaha or Aulos are actually very good). When the bundle of Joy has grown up a bit and his/her friends find the recorder and dribble down it after eating noxious sugary things, you can wash out the nasty smell and infectious slime and it'll be as good as new. And you can use it round the camp fire for folky stuff, or suddenly develop an interest in historical dance, wear a strange cap and funny clothes, and let it blend into the 17th C quite happily too. You've got an enormous repertoire waiting for you, solo or with others, it's your choice. And you can even develop a big chip on your shoulder about how other musicians don't treat it as real, a chip quite as good as any percussionist or viola player can manage. It really is the ideal choice for new parents. You will probably end up with about 8 of them, but even then they don't take up too much space, which means they don't stress the Household Management too much either.


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#10 Tenor Viol

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Posted 23 May 2020 - 08:06

I agree recorders are an option. Sax is also relatively easy to get on with. It's not as fussy in many respects as a clarinet. You can get a decent second-hand alto or tenor for not a lot of money. there are lots of opportunities to play with others, lockdown notwithstanding, should you wish. 


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#11 Arundodonuts

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Posted 23 May 2020 - 10:55

My experience of beginners on saxes is that have two volumes. "Ear piercing" and "off".


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#12 Tenor Viol

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Posted 23 May 2020 - 11:15

My experience of beginners on saxes is that have two volumes. "Ear piercing" and "off".


The loudness is controlled once some embouchure has developed and the sound can be controlled better....
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#13 Arundodonuts

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Posted 23 May 2020 - 13:44

Yes I know, but it doesn't make it an ideal choice for learning if you want to keep the noise down.

 

Going out on a limb here, if you like folk how about melodeon (diatonic button accordion)?


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#14 LoneM

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Posted 23 May 2020 - 17:13

It's a pity the OP thinks the ukulele "too cool", whatever that means, as I'd say it is ideal. I'm playing mine a lot in these lockdown days as I know it doesn't disturb anyone else in the house, unlike the piano or violin which are so much louder.  It is very versatile, and there is a wealth of lovely fingerstyle music including folk for solo playing. With just four strings it is easier than a guitar and can be restrung for a lefty without modification, and is small and light to carry about. Most players are self-taught and there is a wealth of music of all styles out there.

 

Here is an arrangement of an Irish harp piece: O'Carolan's Dream


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#15 hudson1984

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Posted 24 May 2020 - 18:47

Hi all, thanks for the options however I took the digital piano and headphones suggestion. I really want a 2nd instrument, but I also want to get better at piano so having it in the garage does mean I can have it on with headphones off and if needed, headphones on. 

 

With regards to bedtime cues etc. It's tough there as the ceiling really does offer no sound protection at all, so I might as well play in his room. 

 

Anyway, perhaps one day i'll get a 2nd instrument under my belt but I'm really eager to get to grade 5 by the time i'm 40, the intention is to do grade 3 this year (i'll be 36 by year end) Grade 4 next year (37) which then gives me plenty of time to hit grade 5. Who knows, might be able to get further along by the time the big 4-0 comes around. 

 

I'd love to learn the sax but again, noise is an issue. 

I did try violin but when you add the dog singing along that becomes really noisy too :) 

 

Oh well, looking forward to the digital arriving, so now the acoustic piano will get used as and when I can and i'll use the digital for regular practice.


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