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Grade 6 to 8 theory books


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#46 blueglasses

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Posted 02 June 2016 - 11:43

As for monopolies, in the UK at least the AB probably has the most (theory) exam entries with Trinity running a close second and both cover very similar content, as would be expected. So it's more of a duopoly.

Exam entries have nothing to do with producing well rounded musicians, that is the role of the pedagogue to offer a well rounded musical and instrumental curriculum!

There are so many examples in the real world where musicians who hold a specific grade/diploma are useless at musicianship skills etc and they cannot teach and certainly don't possess the knowledge to pass on.The theory exams of the AB/Trinity cannot hold a candle to the AP exam of the USA and the texts offered by international bastions. Do your research and check out the online courses by Steve Laitz from Eastman/Juilliard, then you can talk!


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#47 blueglasses

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Posted 02 June 2016 - 11:45

 

Are you so naiive and ignorant to think that I haven't read her text!  Do I take your comment to be an insult or a joke?

 

You can take my comment in whatever way your wish. You claimed that Butterworth made a mistake by not recognising that chord Ic can be regarded as decoration of chord V. I observed that she makes exactly that point on page 91 of her book.

 

I am pointing out that the definition of 1c V demanded by the accredited exam boards is an incorrect definition and does not hold true against the current philosophy of the renowned theoreticians around the world


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#48 blueglasses

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Posted 02 June 2016 - 11:48

 

I am an ex music examiner

For which examining body, blueglasses, as a matter of interest?

 

One of the accredited ones-ten years of service-it's a system of battery hens going through a procedure that is supposed to produce quality musicians.

An exam will NEVER be the be all and end all and the exam system in the UK needs a thorough overhaul.


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#49 blueglasses

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Posted 02 June 2016 - 11:53

Blueglasses, in light of your assumptions about my musical education, perhaps I really should update my signature to reflect not taking music exams is my choice and does not reflect a lack of education in the field (but that seems a bit long winded). You seem to associate the term "adult learner" with "having little musical education." I, on the other hand, agree with many of the great players who say that you should always be learning, when you stop, your playing stagnates, so I like to remind myself of that in my signature.

As for a study of theory, my teacher was a pupil of Nadia Boulanger and a successful composer and pedagogue, so I have little worry about the standard of my theoretical education.

Thank you for the book list. There are some good books in there. I don't know the Theory Gymnastics text but if nothing else the title has piqued my interest.

The only age-related theory course that I know of is titled "Theory Gymnastics" by the Three Cranky Women-Kjos Publications and these texts fully integrate the eye, ear and tactile roles. This music theory course begins from ages 4-7, 8-11 and then teens to adults.  These texts are full of musical examples balanced with fun activities as well as a complimentary OLC for the Ear Tests.


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#50 mel2

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Posted 02 June 2016 - 12:21

I would like to thank Blueglasses for his recommended reading on the subject of music theory.

 

I note this new 'member' - ahem, is rather coy about the foundation on which he served, but I'll bet it wasn't a Charm School.


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#51 blueglasses

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Posted 02 June 2016 - 12:31

I would like to thank Blueglasses for his recommended reading on the subject of music theory.

 

I note this new 'member' - ahem, is rather coy about the foundation on which he served, but I'll bet it wasn't a Charm School.

I am not at all coy, it's my business if I choose to reveal the exam board I examined for. I am most polite as a person but I do NOT suffer those gladly who presume about me. My comments may not go down well here but I am 100% honest and sincere for anyone that desires to be the best they can be musically.

I have never been to charm school as the need has never arisen.

I am sick of musicians who seem to pay homage to these exam boards who have run a system of battery hens for the past years.

These exam boards need to stop resting on their prestige and work with international theoreticians who have got to grips with their music theory offerings.

The UK is still years behind!

You by the way need to go to Respect School and the School of none presumption, you may learn much!

The UK exam boards' boats need to be rocked!!!!!


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#52 Hildegard

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Posted 02 June 2016 - 12:43

Thank you for the book list. There are some good books in there.

 

The trouble with using American texts in the UK is the considerable number of differences in technical terminology: authentic cadences, deceptive cadences, half cadences, neighbor tones for what we call auxiliaries, non-harmonic tones for what are called inessential notes in the UK and so forth. Not insurmountable, but it adds another layer of complexity for the student.


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#53 BadStrad

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Posted 02 June 2016 - 12:58

Thank you for the book list. There are some good books in there.

 
The trouble with using American texts in the UK is the considerable number of differences in technical terminology: authentic cadences, deceptive cadences, half cadences, neighbor tones for what we call auxiliaries, non-harmonic tones for what are called inessential notes in the UK and so forth. Not insurmountable, but it adds another layer of complexity for the student.
That's true. Personally I don't too much mind the different terminology if I think the book has something interesting to say, but I appreciate what you say about the added layer of complexity.
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#54 BadStrad

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Posted 02 June 2016 - 13:03

Exam entries have nothing to do with producing well rounded musicians,

Hmmm, and yet you assume from *my* lack of music qualifications that I am a (theory) novice. Interesting?
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#55 mel2

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Posted 02 June 2016 - 13:07

I have never been to charm school as the need has never arisen.

You by the way need to go to Respect School and the School of none presumption, you may learn much!
The UK exam boards' boats need to be rocked!!!!!


As for the first statement, probably you are not the best judge.

And the second; you may well be right. I take as I find, though.

I'm all for rocking boats, but as nicely as possible.
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#56 BadStrad

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Posted 02 June 2016 - 13:12

Do NOT presume that I am assuming anything about you

May I ask how else ought I to interpret your assertion that my music credentials are basic?

As for resting on the names of others, what is the difference between my pointing out the pedigree of my teacher and you asserting that "all" the books you've so kindly listed are "excellent?"
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#57 BadStrad

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Posted 02 June 2016 - 13:16

I wonder if the OP is an ex-examiner because he rocked the boat too hard, and we know what happens when you do that. . . ;)
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#58 BadStrad

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Posted 02 June 2016 - 13:20

[ Do your research and check out the online courses by Steve Laitz from Eastman/Juilliard, then you can talk!

I am aware of the availability of online offerings from both UK and international establishments.
There are some very good online courses, very interesting. I've done some of the Julliard ones for fun and thoroughly enjoyed them.
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#59 hummingbird

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Posted 02 June 2016 - 13:55

 

 

I am an ex music examiner

For which examining body, blueglasses, as a matter of interest?

 

One of the accredited ones-ten years of service-it's a system of battery hens going through a procedure that is supposed to produce quality musicians.

 


The AP in the States?

Maybe the exam system for which you claim to be an ex-examiner was "supposed to produce quality musicians", but here in the UK, I think it's the combined efforts of a skilled teacher and a dedicated pupil which normally lead to a musician.  The exam system merely tests the pupil at various stages along the way.


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#60 blueglasses

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Posted 02 June 2016 - 14:01

 

Thank you for the book list. There are some good books in there.

 

The trouble with using American texts in the UK is the considerable number of differences in technical terminology: authentic cadences, deceptive cadences, half cadences, neighbor tones for what we call auxiliaries, non-harmonic tones for what are called inessential notes in the UK and so forth. Not insurmountable, but it adds another layer of complexity for the student.

 

I agree with you regarding terminology but we in the UK do NOT dig deep enough into the extra details, we don't even use the Phrygian Half Cadence in its own right. It doesn't need to be another level of complexity for anyone if we learned more standardized terminology from the onset. We are only just getting to grips with the modal system in the UK from a music theory stance and that's without having to recognize a specific mode by ear!   The AP exam for college entrance in the USA is written and aural. All we do in the UK when it comes to music theory is separate the ear from the eye which should NEVER be done. That's why our music theory offerings are so weak and unmusical (sound with no symbol) in comparison with international offerings.


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