Jump to content


Photo

Looking for piano exercise recommendations for a post-grade 8 pupil

exercises scales piano new post grade 8

  • Please log in to reply
13 replies to this topic

#1 MysterySanderson

MysterySanderson

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts
  • Member: 472410
    Joined: 14-June 12

Posted 25 February 2019 - 10:56

Hi there,

 

One of my pupils recently passed her grade 8 exam. We are currently exploring repertiore and new genres but I would still like her to have a few technical exercises going at the same time, I suppose to replace/supplement the function of scale practice. We are currently working through some easy Burgmuller/Czerny and I'm tempted to do some Hanon/Brahms exercises.

 

Any suggestions/recommendations would be greatly appreciated!


  • 0

#2 ma non troppo

ma non troppo

    Prodigy

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1413 posts
  • Member: 76027
    Joined: 23-September 09

Posted 25 February 2019 - 14:18

I often use Dozen a Day book 5 after Grade 8. It isn't as easy as people think - and I get them to transpose the exercises into other keys. I lift the odd useful exercise from Beringer but am not a disciple.

Starting on c couple of the Chopin Etudes would be a good idea - and anothe vote from me for Burgmuller - again the OP 105 ones aren't so easy as commonly thought - not to play really well.
  • 0

#3 Sautillé

Sautillé

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 129 posts
  • Member: 897314
    Joined: 15-February 17

Posted 25 February 2019 - 21:42

I grew up in the Beringer school.... having done a lot of Hanon and Czerny. My own copy disintegrated long ago and my pupils laugh at me as I try to find the next number exercise off the floor. Agree very strongly with Mnt about transposition which I try to get everyone to do right from grade 2ish. It’s often the case that we pianists avoid thumbs on black notes like the plague and often without thinking. I have a total soft spot though for Berens’ new school of velocity.... they are just lovely pieces. Lastly a vote for the old ABRSM study books and, as others have said, Burgmuller.
  • 0

#4 The Great Sosso

The Great Sosso

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 373 posts
  • Member: 887899
    Joined: 04-February 14

Posted 26 February 2019 - 13:38

Geoffrey Tankard, "Pianoforte Technique on an hour a day". Lots of little, repetitious exercises, many of which modulate through all the keys.  Of course, the idea of an hour a day on technique might put some people off.....


  • 1

#5 Gordon Shumway

Gordon Shumway

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 357 posts
  • Member: 899488
    Joined: 11-February 19
  • London

Posted 26 February 2019 - 15:46

We never did much Czerny. I don't suppose in 6 years of lessons I looked at as many as 6 of his etudes. After grade 8 I worked on the first movement of Beethoven's Pathétique until my scholarship came to an end.


  • 0

#6 LoneM

LoneM

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 479 posts
  • Member: 894763
    Joined: 24-November 15

Posted 26 February 2019 - 16:14

Geoffrey Tankard, "Pianoforte Technique on an hour a day". Lots of little, repetitious exercises, many of which modulate through all the keys.  Of course, the idea of an hour a day on technique might put some people off.....

 

Indeed! - but even just 10 or 15 minutes works absolute wonders, I find.


  • 0

#7 Yet another muso

Yet another muso

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 358 posts
  • Member: 103420
    Joined: 22-May 10

Posted 26 February 2019 - 23:17

My recommendation is Dohnyani's Essential Finger exercises. Leafing through the book it looks really evil, but in fact they are wonderfully efficient. I find a quick burst of them totally wakes up my fingers ready for whatever demands lie ahead in the repertoire I have to play that day. I also pick and choose, having chosen just a small selection (rather than the whole book) which I whip through quickly if I have the time to warm up.

 

The book also has a wonderful preface written by the composer, explaining his view that most pianists spend far too much time playing studies, so he devised these studies which get straight to the point of training the right muscles and coordination, thus freeing up more time to spend playing as much different music as possible which is the most important thing a piano student can do. Which suits my way of thinking!


  • 0

#8 Gordon Shumway

Gordon Shumway

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 357 posts
  • Member: 899488
    Joined: 11-February 19
  • London

Posted 28 February 2019 - 15:17

Dohnyani's Essential Finger exercises..has a wonderful preface written by the composer, explaining his view that most pianists spend far too much time playing studies,

 

Violin is far worse - there are so many thousands of violin studies, it makes me wonder how any violinist can ever find time to learn a piece. In fact, I joke that that's why nowadays you have to start the violin at the age of 3 - otherwise life's too short!


  • 0

#9 David Garner

David Garner

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 69 posts
  • Member: 26836
    Joined: 12-March 08

Posted 28 February 2019 - 23:16

The *only* finger exercises I have ever done have been Dohnyani's. I've never looked at a Hanon or Czerny book. My (organ FRCO) teacher says they far and away give you the "most bang for your buck".


  • 0

#10 agricola

agricola

    Prodigy

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1809 posts
  • Member: 545
    Joined: 01-February 04

Posted 01 March 2019 - 13:18

I like Czerny's 160 8-bar exercises Op 821.  They are quick to learn, cover a wide range of techniques and key-signatures and are more like mini-pieces than the Hanon type of 'drill' exercise.


  • 2

#11 Gordon Shumway

Gordon Shumway

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 357 posts
  • Member: 899488
    Joined: 11-February 19
  • London

Posted 01 March 2019 - 15:21

I was only ever made aware of Czerny's velocity exercises and his dexterity exercises.


  • 0

#12 ma non troppo

ma non troppo

    Prodigy

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1413 posts
  • Member: 76027
    Joined: 23-September 09

Posted 04 March 2019 - 23:35

A quote by the late Abby Whiteside. I mostly agree with her - I think we focus too much on finger training and the fingers will never be equal tools. We have to accept this. That being said, I do some finger training with students - but I don't expect much or for very long:

"Hanon is used for developing independent fingers with equal hitting power. Obviously this cannot be accomplished. Each finger may gain more power, but there will still be inequality in the fingers. Fingers need to be only expert in transmitting the power of the arm."
Abby Whiteside.

I also feel that the more finger training you do, the MORE you have to do to maintain "finger strength" - a term I actually dislike, for it is more a question of coordination and agility. Interestingly, I think Abby Whiteside was very much in favour of Alexander technique. The idea that the fingers were less important than we supposed transformed my playing and helped me relax.
  • 1

#13 MysterySanderson

MysterySanderson

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts
  • Member: 472410
    Joined: 14-June 12

Posted 12 March 2019 - 10:44

Thank you all for your comments and suggestions, it is greatly appreciated!


  • 0

#14 Ritzmar

Ritzmar

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 24 posts
  • Member: 897260
    Joined: 02-February 17
  • Stockport

Posted 01 April 2019 - 10:34

I think that the Rafael Joseffy book, 'School of Advanced Piano Playing' covers EVERYTHING, and in ALL the keys. In my humble opinion it is the best set of keyboard exercises ever written for the advanced pianist.  It blows Hanon out of the water.  But a lot of the exercises are very strenuous indeed, and they must be performed with a degree of caution, and the teacher needs to stress this very strongly.

 

https://www.amazon.c...S/dp/1458415309

 

howDoYouDo.gif


  • 0





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: exercises, scales, piano, new, post grade 8