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#16 ten left thumbs

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Posted 19 July 2019 - 08:10

First off I would beam it all more helpfully, so I can see the crotchet beats more clearly. Then I would put some kind of mark, either a line, or crotchet beats (1,2,3 and 4) above whichever note or rest falls on that beat. Then I would start counting one, two, three, etc, and tap my finger across the page, not especially trying to get the rhythm correct, but just letting the notes flit across my eyes, with the pulses in the correct place. Then I would repeat the last stage, but vocalising any rhythms I can. If anything bothers me, eg rests on pulses, or ties across pulses, I would vocalise for that, and not worry about it. Only once that was in place would I try to *not* vocalise for rests, and try to carry over the tied notes. 

 

The examples above are particularly obtuse, and have no musical meaning (none that I can fathom, apart from being difficult). But sometimes in band we have to read rhythms not far off that, in terms of levels of obtuseness, and they do come together when the whole band gets them right. I try always to carry a pencil so I can correct bad beaming, as in the examples above. You get a lot of bad beaming in brass band music and it drives me nuts. 


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#17 -Victoria-

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Posted 20 July 2019 - 07:41

The second bar is much easier than the first. I would make a pig's ear of the first if I wasn't allowed any time to think it through, but the 2nd would be relatively easy.
I think you have to ask yourself what situation you are practising for. If it's exams then you are allowed to try things out in the prep time - I would try out the first bar not the 2nd. I would probably still mess it up but not so spectacularly! I would be counting quavers. If it's for sight reading in a more relaxed scenario then I'd get my pencil out and mark the beats, play it a few times etc.
Regarding ties - it can help to "play" the tied part of the note in your mind only , or if you can, play it first untied then immediately tied while you're trying it out. The bar 2 rhythms come up a lot in jazz big band style stuff albeit normally swung too.
Another method is to sing da-da-da for the rhythm while clapping or stamping the pulse (ignoring pitch).
Your analogy with reading words fluently is a good one. Rhythm is definitely learned in a similar way. With a complex (horrible!) rhythm like the first you are much more likely to encounter the same rhythm in the same piece than anywhere else, so you would probably get several chances at nailing it. Continuing the analogy, it would be like encountering a long nonsense word while reading a poem out loud. You might stumble over it a bit the first time, but if you stop and spell it out slowly when you see it again in line 10 you'll be able to say it.
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#18 Ligneo Fistula

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Posted 21 July 2019 - 14:36

First off I would beam it all more helpfully, so I can see the crotchet beats more clearly. ....  so I can correct bad beaming, as in the examples above. You get a lot of bad beaming in brass band music and it drives me nuts. 

Thank you, TLT, for taking the time and trouble to look into this for me and very kindly share your expertise. It's really appreciated. I am also extremely sorry that my beaming is so absolutely terrible, it was certainly never my intention to offend you so grossly or, as with your band music, "drive [you] nuts".  In all naivety I thought I had followed the instructions in The AB Guide to Music Theory: Part 1 (pp. 33–40) on grouping and beaming.  Again, please accept my deepest and genuine apologies for the offence caused.


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#19 ten left thumbs

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Posted 21 July 2019 - 20:09

 

First off I would beam it all more helpfully, so I can see the crotchet beats more clearly. ....  so I can correct bad beaming, as in the examples above. You get a lot of bad beaming in brass band music and it drives me nuts. 

Thank you, TLT, for taking the time and trouble to look into this for me and very kindly share your expertise. It's really appreciated. I am also extremely sorry that my beaming is so absolutely terrible, it was certainly never my intention to offend you so grossly or, as with your band music, "drive [you] nuts".  In all naivety I thought I had followed the instructions in The AB Guide to Music Theory: Part 1 (pp. 33–40) on grouping and beaming.  Again, please accept my deepest and genuine apologies for the offence caused.

 

Don't be sorry, it takes a lot more than that to offend me, and stuff I see in band music can be waaay worse...

 

So if you have a look half-way down page 36 of the book you quote, about beams continuing over rests, and the examples they cross-reference, you may see how the beaming can be done better. What you have isn't wrong as such, it's just not that friendly on the eye, with a view to the flow the eye must do across the page. When something is printed out in a way that irritates me, I tend to pencil the beams above as I want them. And if that bothers someone else, they can rub it out. 


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