Jump to content


Photo

100 marks at G1, due to full marks in aural


  • Please log in to reply
11 replies to this topic

#1 funkiepiano

funkiepiano

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 541 posts
  • Member: 15203
    Joined: 28-August 07

Posted 09 July 2019 - 14:50

Just got this result for a pupil I’ve taught for the last 5 years. Would it be irresponsible of me not to show her the breakdown sheet? The only sections she got above the pass mark for, were aural and scales, despite studying her pieces for the best past of a year. The entry was deferred from last term as she definitely wasn’t ready then. She’s been going on about taking G1 for the last 2 years, and I want to celebrate her pass, not dwell on her weaknesses. She’s a lovely girl but has some issues with confidence and possible dyslexia, although I haven’t been informed of that and feel it’s not my place to ask. Also any advice on what to do with her going forward assuming she wants to continue lessons, would be useful, thanks
  • 0

#2 porilo

porilo

    Prodigy

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1338 posts
  • Member: 138745
    Joined: 15-October 10
  • South West London

Posted 09 July 2019 - 15:03

I always give my pupils the breakdown sheet because it's their property, not mine, but I keep a copy for my own records. I also take time to go through the examiner's comments and discuss them with the pupil so that we both know which areas need to be worked on more. Certainly a pass is worth celebrating but I feel it's also important that they are made aware of any weaknesses so that they know what needs more attention. I currently have a pupil who is the total opposite. She plays her pieces accurately and beautifully, her sight-reading is brilliant, but she really struggles with the scales and aural tests. 


  • 0

#3 Latin pianist

Latin pianist

    Virtuoso

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3751 posts
  • Member: 711500
    Joined: 01-April 13
  • Cotswolds

Posted 09 July 2019 - 15:06

I did that once with a very weak pupil. Would she or her parents be aware that there is a mark sheet? Or maybe you could have it with you in the lesson and read any positive comments then hang on to it!
  • 0

#4 Jlma

Jlma

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 77 posts
  • Member: 895419
    Joined: 25-May 16

Posted 09 July 2019 - 15:38

I'd definitely show and give the mark sheet to the parents and make it clear to them that it might not be a good idea to do exams in the near future. Even if they don't know that there is a mark sheet, they could find out any time.

 

In fact, I do that even with pupils who get only a pass but with higher marks at any grade. A pass for me means that there are some serious issues with the playing (unless the marking was highly unfair), especially if the pass mark wasn't even reached for the pieces.

 

I'd give them loads of pieces at the same difficulty level (or even lower) of the grade they've just passed for at least 2 terms. If at some point in the future I think they're ready, they can do the next grade if they want to.

 

It's good that she passed and definitely praise her for what went well. But it's important she knows what didn't go so well. 

 

There is a danger if you don't let the parents and the child know, they might happily assume all is fine now for going straight on to grade 2 and she may never get there, or only after a very long time.

 

I'd also ask parents whether a child has any learning difficulties, especially if I'm suspecting this. Why do you think it's not your place to ask? As a parent, I informed my own children's teachers of their learning difficulties as I think it was important for them to know - even though we never made use of the special allowances the boards provide for these, as it wasn't necessary. But it might be something to look into for when she does perhaps do grade 2 one day, after all.


  • 0

#5 Norway

Norway

    Virtuoso

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4664 posts
  • Member: 452922
    Joined: 05-May 12

Posted 09 July 2019 - 15:39

I'd show  her the mark sheet. I got the same for one of my own exams (which shall remain unspecified!) Not a moment's practice wasted! laugh.png


  • 1

#6 Latin pianist

Latin pianist

    Virtuoso

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3751 posts
  • Member: 711500
    Joined: 01-April 13
  • Cotswolds

Posted 09 July 2019 - 15:44

Usually examiners find something positive to say so if you do give her the sheet I'd be tempted to underline anything good..Obviously I don't know what the comments are, but things like,a good start, G major was known, some shape achieved. Or maybe there wasn't anything positive.
Or you could wait till you get the certificate and give both together.
  • 0

#7 Dorcas

Dorcas

    Prodigy

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1003 posts
  • Member: 887843
    Joined: 23-January 14
  • Hertfordshire

Posted 09 July 2019 - 15:45

I would just let the student have the mark sheet.  A pass is a pass after all, and it sounds like she earned it.  In general, performance exams are how you do on the day, and not necessarily a safe prediction on what the future holds.


  • 1

#8 Misterioso

Misterioso

    Virtuoso

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 5989 posts
  • Member: 13351
    Joined: 18-July 07
  • Outer Hebrides

Posted 09 July 2019 - 16:39

I'd also ask parents whether a child has any learning difficulties, especially if I'm suspecting this. Why do you think it's not your place to ask? As a parent, I informed my own children's teachers of their learning difficulties as I think it was important for them to know - even though we never made use of the special allowances the boards provide for these, as it wasn't necessary. But it might be something to look into for when she does perhaps do grade 2 one day, after all.

 

This is something I make a point of asking in the very first introductory lesson. In order to get the best out of our students, we need to know about any special learning needs, difficulties, things they may struggle with or need extra support for. No parent has ever queried the fact that I ask this.

 

It sounds as though it has been a long road for your G1 student. First and foremost, I would encourage her to celebrate her success - because it is a success. Then you could talk about how you plan to move forwards and things that will need more work, using the marks sheet to support this.


  • 0

#9 Hedgehog

Hedgehog

    Virtuoso

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 6582 posts
  • Member: 3747
    Joined: 25-May 05
  • Suburbia

Posted 09 July 2019 - 16:49

I've had this kind of situation with a pupil in the past, and I always say that the full marks in the aural are a good indicator of the general musicality of the pupil. It depends of course on the parent and pupil reaction, but would this pupil be well advised to continue with piano but not exams, and if she wants to take music exams perhaps singing might be a route for her?


  • 2

#10 funkiepiano

funkiepiano

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 541 posts
  • Member: 15203
    Joined: 28-August 07

Posted 12 July 2019 - 16:35


I'd also ask parents whether a child has any learning difficulties, especially if I'm suspecting this. Why do you think it's not your place to ask? As a parent, I informed my own children's teachers of their learning difficulties as I think it was important for them to know - even though we never made use of the special allowances the boards provide for these, as it wasn't necessary. But it might be something to look into for when she does perhaps do grade 2 one day, after all.


This is something I make a point of asking in the very first introductory lesson. In order to get the best out of our students, we need to know about any special learning needs, difficulties, things they may struggle with or need extra support for. No parent has ever queried the fact that I ask this.

It sounds as though it has been a long road for your G1 student. First and foremost, I would encourage her to celebrate her success - because it is a success. Then you could talk about how you plan to move forwards and things that will need more work, using the marks sheet to support this.

I do make a point of asking, it’s on my initial letter that I give to parents at the beginning, to let me know about any learning differences. But if I ask further down the line,it could come out sounding like I think the child is thick, if they’ve not been diagnosed with anything
  • 2

#11 Dorcas

Dorcas

    Prodigy

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1003 posts
  • Member: 887843
    Joined: 23-January 14
  • Hertfordshire

Posted 13 July 2019 - 06:08

Sometimes dyslexia is not always discovered by the parents at the time of the first meeting or lesson.  Also, the parents might not wish to disclose it, at first.  I know deafness is not an issue for this student, but issues with hearing can arise over time with ear infections, glue ear and so on.  Sometimes, students just have a long road to achieve goals, and working alongside them is our job.  Frankly, it is not possible to obtain every detail pertinent to instrumental teaching at the first lesson or via a letter.  Sometimes parents will disclose a child is on the spectrum, but this can be impossible to discuss with the student present.  A grade one exam result is not an indication of that child's all round abilities or future.  Funkiepiano, I would just go with the flow, and if you get the chance, perhaps ask some open ended questions? 

 

edit: I have a pre grade 1 student, who has been learning his music off by heart.  I was fooled into thinking he was reading his music.  Learning things by rote is how this youngster operates, and I am working with him on the note reading and interval recognition.


  • 0

#12 Gran'piano

Gran'piano

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 316 posts
  • Member: 899443
    Joined: 19-January 19

Posted 13 July 2019 - 18:56

Sometimes it comes over a lot better with parents if, instead of asking if there is any learning problem or unseen disability in a pupil which we should know about, we ask what sort of learner the child is. How it learn things best at school. Something may come up which helps to explain a difficulty. Some (adults too) learn better by reading information, others by hearing, others by feeling a movement themselves, still others by watching someone else do something and then imitating them. We've had several posts on here about these various forms and we have to be aware that a child may use the method which is easiest for them - even without us noticing, and maybe not even realising it themselves. A pupil who rapidly learns music off by heart will only sight read if there is a constant supply of new scores. Preferably without being told their title. If he has heard the piece before, he'll be using this knowledge to back up his sight reading. If we know a tune, we don't need to concentrate on the rhythm but play it correctly automatically. It's interesting in a church when a new hymn book is introduced. Although the tunes are in the book, many a verse may be sung before the congregation realise that the organ is playing what the book says and they are singing what the previous book said. 


  • 1