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#91 Aquarelle

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Posted 11 October 2018 - 21:27

The moles are back sad.png.  Little Toad has now been joined by Tiny Toad smile.png. The border needs weeding but I haven't been able to get available time and the right weather to synchronize. My tomatoes are coming to the end - there are still a few green ones but I don't think they will ripen now. I haven't yet located any beech but will keep looking.


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#92 chris13

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Posted 12 October 2018 - 07:16

 I haven't yet located any beech but will keep looking.

 

I wonder if beech doesn't grow too well in your climate and therefore that is why they are difficult to come across. Hedging can be bought from specialist nurseries in the UK but I have no idea if they can supply to other EU countries.


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#93 Aquarelle

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Posted 12 October 2018 - 09:26

Actually I have never seen any beech trees in this area so it might be that but at our half term holiday I'll perhaps have time to go to our local garden centre and  If they can't supply beech they might be able to suggest an alternative shrub for encouraging birds. it's the right time of year for planting, anyway. I am worried about the fact that we have very few small  birds and we now have magpies who prey on them.


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#94 Aquarelle

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Posted 17 October 2018 - 19:00

I have not done any serious gardening since my post just above. But I have had someone come to cut the plane trees and he turned up  yesterday - early enough this year to do the job  before we become  knee deep in dead leaves. He made a good job of it, didn't break any of the branches we are trying to link together to make a sort of tunnel and didn't break my washing line either. He also cut a thick branch of wisteria that had got hopelessly out of control and was invading one of the upstairs windows. So the garden is beginning t look autumnal.


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#95 Aquarelle

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Posted 23 October 2018 - 16:00

Well, on one else has posted for a few days so here I go again. I took the dog to the poodle parlour yesterday and took advantage of the fact that I was then half way on the road to our nearest big garden centre. I haven't been there for a couple of years - and when i got there I found that they had gone out of business! so no chance of getting any beech. I have looked into it and in fact it seems that beech does not do very well south of the Loire. I can order some on the net but I would have liked to have seen the shrubs first and talked to someone who could tell me a bit more about how to look after them this far south. Or perhaps suggest an alternative.

 

Before collecting the dog I tried a large gardening shop - no luck but I I did manage to get everything for setting up the bird feeders for the winter - which I can now do as the plane trees have been cut. I have also spent several hours cutting the ivy off the garden wall which runs along the road. That job isn't finished but is well on the way. I also pruned the  lagerstroemia as a couple of winters ago I didn't and it got ripped down in a storm. The weather has been just right for gardening and I have my fingers crossed that this will continue.


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#96 chris13

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Posted 23 October 2018 - 16:19

I have finished trimming our beech hedges and this afternoon I raked the last of the  clippings so I could put them into bins prior to disposal. On the other side of the south side hedge our neighbours are having major work done in levelling their garden.

 

Wondering if I should find room in the garden for two or three elderberry trees as I have recently returned to wine making. Perhaps not as there are plenty growing along a country lane not more than 100m away. I'm bottling some elderberry wine tomorrow.


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#97 Aquarelle

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Posted 04 November 2018 - 17:23

We've got an elderberry bush but we didn't plant it - it just grew there. It makes masses of berries every year and then needs cutting back. I have never been brave enough to do anything with the berries. I think you can use the flowers as well.

 

I am now the proud possessor of a vegetable shredder made by Wolfe. I got it via click and collect and couldn't lift the parcel out of the boot of the car so had to open it in place and remove as much as possible. I still had a tough time getting the motor block out and indoors.  I am now studying the instructions for putting it together but I will need help. Even if I manage to understand them there is no way I will be able to lift the motor part by myself. I bought it because tripping to the rubbish dump with four 170 litre bags of garden rubbish rather got me down!

 

This afternoon I removed a fairly large and very prickly yucca from an old wheelbarrow where it had taken  root for something like 25 years. That was rather a tough job! Then I potted it in a large green plastic pot. I wanted an earthenware pot but they were too expensive and too heavy. I had to saw off some of the roots to get it in the pot so I hope it will take. I put some ice plants in the pot with it to help stop the weeds from colonizing. There is a second yucca waiting its turn but that one is on the ground in a broken pot - and it is a little smaller. I can now take the old and rotting wheelbarrow to the rubbish dump. I don't actually like yuccas very much but I had rather got used to these two.

 

My efforts to encourage the smaller birds to come and feed in the garden are paying off. I think they will rake up their winter quarters here. 


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#98 Maizie

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Posted 04 November 2018 - 21:05

[Posted on completely wrong thread, took me 48 hours to notice...!]


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#99 Aquarelle

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Posted 19 November 2018 - 13:57

The yucca in the pot seems to have taken. I haven't had time to deal with the second one and what is worse, I haven't had time to start putting my shredder together.

The grass needs cutting but it's too wet. Big Toad, Little Toad and Tiny Toad have all put in another appearance, the wretched moles are wrecking parts of the garden again and someone has sat - or slept - in the middle of my parsley bed so I have had to cut quite a lot so will have to freeze it. I bought a book about growing food plants in containers and bags  as I thought that might be an easier option than ploughing up a bit of our lawn  /field. However the author manged to make it all seem terribly complicated - in any case, now I come to think of it I have never seen a grow-bag in any of the garden shops around here.

 

The persimmon tree has shed its leaves and they have fallen in a pretty circle around it. Once the leaves were down the starlings moved in to eat the fruit. I was glad to see them as I'd rather they had it than the Asian hornets. The fig tree has also finally shed its leaves but the wisteria is still green.


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#100 stetenorve

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Posted 22 December 2018 - 13:02

Presumably we can blame global warming, but we have outside pots filled with geraniums (pelargoniums) which are still flowering. I have always dumped these as annuals towards the middle/end of October in previous years.


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#101 Aquarelle

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Posted 29 December 2018 - 18:25

We have a pear tree which is flowering and the leaves of the wisteria have only just turned yellow and fallen. There are also dandelions and daisies. It must be, as you say  stetenorve, global warming. Little  Toad has not hibernated either. I have seen him on the patio several times this week.

 

I spent the morning digging in seven anti-mole devices. The little demons are back. The lawn tractor won't start - and the battery is charged. In any case I can't  mow at the moment as the grass is too wet so the tractor will go to be repaired and serviced next week.                                                           '


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#102 Banjogirl

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Posted 29 December 2018 - 20:25

I've got a chrysanthemum in a pot outside the kitchen door which flowered rather festively for Christmas. Lots of snowdrops are already in full flower.
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#103 Aquarelle

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Posted 05 January 2019 - 20:37

I found a minute primrose plant that some animal had dug up. I have put it in a tiny pot and am bringing it in at night in the hope that it will grow. These are real wild primroses that just grew in our garden and then disappeared all but for one small clump so I am doing my bit for bio-diversity. We have had two nights of quite hard frost so I have protected the parent plant as well. I have childhood memories of the Somerset hedgerows full of primroses - and that scent! 


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#104 Norway

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Posted 06 January 2019 - 10:36

I have one little wild primrose in a pot too (grown from Chilterns Seeds, who do alot of native stuff). Will be sowing bee balm and hyssop this year to add to bee and butterfly garden. smile.png


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#105 Hedgehog

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Posted 06 January 2019 - 21:39

Advice please: we had 2 conifers chopped down, and stumps ground out, so we have a lot of conifer wood chippings in two heaps.  I would like to get rid of them so that I can use the space where the trees were for something else. However, I have heard that conifer chippings are acidic, so I'm wondering whether it's wise to scatter them liberally around the garden.

Does anyone have words of wisdom, or any experience please?


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