Jump to content


Photo

Grade 1 theory syllabus - huge!

theory syllabus violin

  • Please log in to reply
19 replies to this topic

#16 BadStrad

BadStrad

    Virtuoso

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4057 posts
  • Member: 88756
    Joined: 28-January 10

Posted 20 September 2015 - 22:09

Oh lordy - no, let's not get into the equal temperament thing here. :)

What you are describing is what I am trying to overcome in my book-to-be.
  • 0

#17 linda.ff

linda.ff

    Maestro

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8034 posts
  • Member: 183500
    Joined: 04-January 11
  • Cambridge

Posted 20 September 2015 - 22:25

Oh lordy - no, let's not get into the equal temperament thing here. :)


Nonono I promise!!!! I'm a piano player! (My piano tuner said they only do sharp names)

What you are describing is what I am trying to overcome in my book-to-be.

Well, yes, this is what I'm trying to find out - how do you do the writing (not the playing or the hearing) of the tone/semitone structure of various different scales without a visual depiction of any kind?

Yes, I know I'm being pianocentric. The piano is the musician's doodle-pad and slide-rule all rolled into one, and that's why teaching it is different from teaching any other instrument, and really I think it's one of the main reasons why colleges tend to make sure you have keyboard skills of some kind, whatever you're studying.

Your visual aid doesn't have to be a piano keyboard, it can be anything, but I'm quite sure that pianists find the piano layout extremely useful in theory, and I'd also like to ask if people who play wind and string instruments and also piano have preferred to use a piano-style layout when working out theory.

You can't get away from the fact that going up a chromatic scale some notes have just letter names (because natural just means "not a sharp or flat" and not something special on its own) and some have sharp and flat names and fit in between.
  • 0

#18 linda.ff

linda.ff

    Maestro

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8034 posts
  • Member: 183500
    Joined: 04-January 11
  • Cambridge

Posted 20 September 2015 - 22:53

Actually I might have found one of your answers, BadStrad!

http://www.richardor...tobin/cl-02.htm

Invented by Candida Tobin. A genius in some respects, missing the mark in some others.
  • 0

#19 BadStrad

BadStrad

    Virtuoso

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4057 posts
  • Member: 88756
    Joined: 28-January 10

Posted 21 September 2015 - 12:03

Linda - thank you for the link.  I think in some ways the notation ruler is similar to the violin neck images I've been creating.

 

I do think that in some ways the violin is a better way of seeing how scales are put together (than the piano) because everything is a series of semitone intervals between fingers, which all have equal weight - no black and white keys.  But - it's hard to see what your fingers are doing, unlike on the piano.


  • 0

#20 Hildegard

Hildegard

    Prodigy

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1132 posts
  • Member: 887389
    Joined: 26-October 13

Posted 21 September 2015 - 16:46

Do spare a thought for wind players in all this. The trumpeter who produces higher pitches through lip pressure (very difficult to see!), the trombonist who starts out logically by bringing in the slide to step up the scale, but after 7 notes has to put it all the way out again to go higher, the clarinettist who proceeds up the scale by removing fingers (in a not entirely logical order), but then has to put them all down again to go above the break ...


  • 0





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: theory, syllabus, violin