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Pedants' Paradise


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#3301 Gordon Shumway

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Posted 11 April 2019 - 09:29

 I have been told before now that my pronunciation of Italian words in English is OTT but it is actually really difficult to NOT pronounce Italian words correctly if you are used to saying them every day! I remember once my Italian husband was corrected by a waitress in England for ordering a pizza siciliana  correctly as "si-chill-i-a-na" when she insisted it was "si -sill-i ana". I fell into the same trap with "ciabatta" and "bruschetta". When I left the UK they were not common words so I learnt them first with their Italian pronunciation and it feels weird to try and say them in an English way!

I know. Ever since I worked in a Greek restaurant I pronounce it moussaká (I think the boss called it moussakás, but I manage to avoid the temptation to call it that). I even had a cockney cook in our works canteen many years later "correct" me thus: "iss pronarnced moussARka".

But on the whole I do prefer to keep it British, ever since I heard someone on the antiques roadshow pronounce it "jardineer", and cafeteer is so much less affected than pretending you can speak French. And I think Jeeves pronounces the t on the end of valet. Unfortunately, I don't think we can go back and pronounce the t in chalet. I've got a friend who pronounces his Italian coffees with huge affectation even when the woman serving him is West Indian. And if that doesn't convince you, he uses the plural verb with spaghetti!

 

I've never heard ciabatta pronounced except in the Italian way.


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#3302 Aeolienne

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Posted 11 April 2019 - 09:32

Sign in a charity shop window: "WE URGENTLY NEED DONATIONS OF LADIES CLOTHES, CD'S AND DVD,S"

You pay peanuts...


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#3303 Gordon Shumway

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Posted 11 April 2019 - 09:41

On the subject of names, I'm not too bad at pronouncing French and German, except that I pronounce my French with a German accent, which I'm deeply ashamed of. But those Alsatian names that are half French and half German, they could be Klingon for all I can understand how to pronounce them.


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#3304 Gordon Shumway

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Posted 11 April 2019 - 09:45

Sign in M&S Colliers Wood:

 

Waste: we'll aim to

ensure that none of our

clothing or packaging

needs end up as landfill.

 

lesson in the subjunctive required there, I think.


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#3305 Aeolienne

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Posted 11 April 2019 - 14:40

I remember a poster on London buses during the 80s/90s which said: "If a man on this bus gets caught evading his fare, would you look at him? Think about it."

Whoever came up with the grossly sexist Fiat 127 Palio advert knew their subjunctives at least.


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#3306 zwhe

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Posted 11 April 2019 - 17:06

School uniform order form:

Please delete which is not applicable for either :

 

The space before the colon is in the original. This was handed out by the school.


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#3307 Gordon Shumway

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Posted 12 April 2019 - 09:32

I guess we've had this already, but I can't read 221 pages of thread.

In the Seventies I was taught you say something like "If the reader goes to page 10, they will see a paragraph on..."

That presumably morphed in the 80s into  "If the reader goes to page 10, he will see a paragraph on..."

And that has now morphed into "If the reader goes to page 10, she will see a paragraph on...", partly in politically-correct reaction, partly because abstracts, e.g. in Greek and Latin, are in the feminine a lot of the time, maybe, I guess?
 
There really wasn't any need. It was all right in the 70s! [/irony]

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#3308 Aeolienne

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Posted 14 April 2019 - 16:35

Taken from the product description for a pack of Sainsbury's non-latex household gloves:

Non-latex household gloves are dermatologically tested and made from a polymer, they do not contain either the natural rubber protein or the chemical accelerators which are the usual cause of sensitivity to rubber.

Er ... rubber is a polymer, as are all proteins!


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#3309 elemimele

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Posted 14 April 2019 - 22:10

This one annoys me greatly. It's downright clumsy having to write "he/she", "he or she", or "s/he" (try reading the last out loud), but writing "she" everywhere is no better than writing "he" everywhere - it assumes a gender which may be incorrect. It also tends to distract the reader's attention, leading them to think about gender issues rather than the subject of the writing.

I have no idea what we're supposed to do. I have another dilemma with forms of address: if I don't know the marital status of a lady (and why should I?) then should I write to her as Miss, or Mrs? If I choose Ms, I stand an equal chance of causing offence.

Fortunately I work in science, so I can call everyone "Dr" with little risk, and I rarely get the opportunity to use a pronoun. Stuffy journal editors get upset at the mention of something so human as a "he" or a "she", let alone (heaven forbid!) an "I". I don't write. It was written.


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#3310 fsharpminor

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Posted 15 April 2019 - 08:34

 

 I have been told before now that my pronunciation of Italian words in English is OTT but it is actually really difficult to NOT pronounce Italian words correctly if you are used to saying them every day! I remember once my Italian husband was corrected by a waitress in England for ordering a pizza siciliana  correctly as "si-chill-i-a-na" when she insisted it was "si -sill-i ana". I fell into the same trap with "ciabatta" and "bruschetta". When I left the UK they were not common words so I learnt them first with their Italian pronunciation and it feels weird to try and say them in an English way!

I know. Ever since I worked in a Greek restaurant I pronounce it moussaká (I think the boss called it moussakás, but I manage to avoid the temptation to call it that). I even had a cockney cook in our works canteen many years later "correct" me thus: "iss pronarnced moussARka".

But on the whole I do prefer to keep it British, ever since I heard someone on the antiques roadshow pronounce it "jardineer", and cafeteer is so much less affected than pretending you can speak French. And I think Jeeves pronounces the t on the end of valet. Unfortunately, I don't think we can go back and pronounce the t in chalet. I've got a friend who pronounces his Italian coffees with huge affectation even when the woman serving him is West Indian. And if that doesn't convince you, he uses the plural verb with spaghetti!

 

I've never heard ciabatta pronounced except in the Italian way.

 

The one that grates with me is when people pronounce Turmeric as Tewmeric.  Even John Torode (Masterchef)  does it, a trained chef !  But then he's an Aussie !


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#3311 Gran'piano

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Posted 15 April 2019 - 09:42

Took me a while to realise that Kochel Catalogue referred to on a radio programme was the Köchel Verzeichnis. Just didn't connect.
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#3312 Edwardo

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Posted 15 April 2019 - 12:10

And I think Jeeves pronounces the t on the end of valet. 

 

 

 

That's because the correct pronunciation of valet sounds the final letter.


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#3313 JudithJ

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Posted 15 April 2019 - 19:44

This is from a facebook group in my local area:

say it to a man who can defend theirselves and knock your perfectic head off your shoulders


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#3314 Sylvette

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Posted 16 April 2019 - 13:13

I could fill pages and pages with illiterate quotes from facebook.  Charitably, I assume some of them are the result of predictive text or simply finger trouble, but the illiteracy of some posts beggars belief.


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#3315 musicalmalc

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Posted 16 April 2019 - 15:43

I could fill pages and pages with illiterate quotes from facebook.  Charitably, I assume some of them are the result of predictive text or simply finger trouble, but the illiteracy of some posts beggars belief.

predictive text is definitely a common issue; "its" being changed to "it's" is one I often miss when it's done it to me

 

It also annoys me when people post a second time to correct something rather than editing the original post - ignorance or laziness, who can say


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