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Boring Le Couppey Study

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#1 The Great Sosso

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Posted 16 May 2018 - 14:02

I've got a great book of Studies, published by Trinity, covering grades 2-4, which I use with many students in between grades.  Lots from Le Couppey, Burgmuller etc - mostly tuneful and engaging.  BUT I have started the Le Couppey study in C (op 17 No 18) with two or three students who needed to work on finding their way quickly around the keys / ledger line note reading / pedal, and they all get bored of it before it's really up to speed.  Personally, I love the feeling of playing it - arm crossing and covering several octaves, with easy pedal and a flowing feel, but all my students end up hating it and  we abandon ship before it's really done.

 

Does anyone have bright ideas for how to teach this one to a higher standard without it getting boring or is it just a piece that nobody else likes?

 

 

TGS X  


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#2 Dorcas

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Posted 16 May 2018 - 15:01

Use a stop watch and see how fast they can play it accurately?


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#3 sbhoa

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Posted 16 May 2018 - 17:20

How long is it?

Is it possible to agree to do part of it if it covers the skills?

I don't know this but if it's something like even quavers how about letting the swing them?

Perhaps it's just one that needs to be learned at a later stage than you might think at the moment?


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#4 agricola

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Posted 17 May 2018 - 08:43

How long is it?

Is it possible to agree to do part of it if it covers the skills?

I don't know this but if it's something like even quavers how about letting the swing them?

Perhaps it's just one that needs to be learned at a later stage than you might think at the moment?

I think it needs to be played up to speed and with flow before it stops sounding like typing so (like many studies) it may be better to use it later when the note-reading aspect can be covered easily.  Swinging sounds like a good idea though.

 

One reason I like the Piano Adventures books is that they introduce pieces which cover the keyboard at an early stage.  These give learners a much better idea of how it will feel to play the piano than plodding around on middle C for months.  I forget which book it's in but "The Tempest" is always a favourite.


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#5 The Great Sosso

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Posted 21 May 2018 - 12:02

Thanks for the advice.  I am concluding that it's harder than I think and at least one element of note reading, keyboard navigation and pedal needs to be secure before the piece can be tackled successfully - I'm trying to do too many things at once with it I think.  I've tended to use it between grades 2-3 but maybe it's more 3-4 or even 4-5 to consolidate pedalling and keeping the flow going.  Oh well.  Maybe they'll come back to it themselves one day and see why I like it so much.

 

TGS X


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#6 agricola

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Posted 22 May 2018 - 21:55

It's hard not too feel slightly snubbed when a piece we like doesn't appeal to pupils but I try to find pieces that people really want to play.  Lukewarm is not good enough. I learnt this lesson when I first started using Rockschool exams and practice times for the 'non-classical' set suddenly shot up!


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